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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Irma Tikkanen and Leila Jaakkola

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Design/methodology/approach

Nutritional quality and the core factors used when evaluating the nutritional quality of menus are discussed. The empirical data were collected in 2008 by theme interviewing nine municipal food service employees. The data were analysed by a thematic analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that both positive and contributing factors emerged as follows: productisation of menu; using a plate model; length of a control period concerning the nutritional quality of the menu; checking the nutrition content when making changes in menus, dishes and food items; dealing with the results of the evaluation in the meetings; including the results in the service agreements; employers' positive attitude displayed towards software suppliers' training; including nutritional quality as a part of service quality; and implementing nutritional quality according to the job descriptions.

Practical implications

A variety of courses should be offered for the students concerning the guidance of food production by using software in professional kitchens; integrating working life into the curriculum; continuous training of the food service personnel; and cooperation with the professional kitchen's software suppliers. Moreover, further implications could involve, for example, developing and diffusing the national model for the nutritional quality follow‐up; and taking the Sinfos‐product information data bank into use.

Originality/value

Active updating of the software and training of the employees are needed in order to ensure the nutritional quality of menus.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Saheed Adewale Omoniyi, Adamu Musa Muhammad and Ruth Ayuba

Calyx of okra pods is usually cut off and discarded as a waste during processing, whereas the pulp and seeds are being used. This study aims to investigate the nutrient…

Abstract

Purpose

Calyx of okra pods is usually cut off and discarded as a waste during processing, whereas the pulp and seeds are being used. This study aims to investigate the nutrient composition and anti-nutritional properties of okra calyx flour.

Design/methodology/approach

Calyces from four varieties (Ex-kwadon, Solar, Chalawa and Syria) of okra pods were processed into flour. The proximate composition, mineral content, vitamin content and anti-nutritional composition of the flour samples were analysed by using standard methods.

Findings

There were significant differences in moisture content (p = 0.012), crude fat (p = 0.001), crude fibre (p = 0.002), carbohydrate (p = 0.002), sodium (p < 0.001), magnesium (p < 0.001), iron (p < 0.001), zinc (p = 0.006), vitamin A (p < 0.001) and vitamin C (p = 0.001) contents of okra calyx flour. The values of proximate composition ranged 8.1-8.9%, 8.4-9.0%, 14.3-15.3%, 1.4-2.1%, 16.9-18.2% and 47.1-49.4% for moisture content, ash, crude protein, crude fat, crude fibre and carbohydrate, respectively, whereas the values of mineral contents ranged 7.6-8.7 mg/100g, 35.7-41.2 mg/100g, 26.5-28.1 mg/100g, 93.2-95.8 mg/100g, 1.6-1.8 mg/100g and 5.2-5.7 mg/100g for sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, iron and zinc, respectively. The values of vitamin contents of okra calyx flour ranged 0.2-0.3 µg/100g, 7.1-8.9 mg/100g and 0.1-0.2 mg/100g for vitamin A, vitamin C and thiamine contents respectively. Also, there were significant differences in the values of phytate (p = 0.023), oxalate (p = 0.011) and saponin (p < 0.001) contents with the values of anti-nutritional properties ranging 1.3-1.5 mg/100g, 2.5-3.3 mg/100g, 7.4-9.7 mg/100g and 2.3-3.6 mg/100g for tannin, phytate, oxalate and saponin contents, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

There are scanty published works/information on proximate composition, mineral content, vitamin content and anti-nutritional composition of okra calyx flour.

Practical implications

The study showed that okra calyx flour could be useful in fortification/supplement of carbohydrate-based foods in food system.

Originality/value

Okra calyx flour comprises high crude fibre, crude protein, ash and vitamin C contents. Also, calcium is the major mineral content of okra calyx flour followed by magnesium and potassium. However, the tannin content reported higher in okra leaf flour, and okra flour is low in okra calyx flour.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Sarah Hopkins and Jan Mei Soon

Coeliac disease (CD) is a life-long condition requiring strict adherence to a gluten-free (GF) diet. Due to wide claims of availability and lower costs of gluten-free food…

Abstract

Purpose

Coeliac disease (CD) is a life-long condition requiring strict adherence to a gluten-free (GF) diet. Due to wide claims of availability and lower costs of gluten-free food (GFF) and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England needing to save costs, access to prescriptions for patients with CD is being limited in England. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the availability and cost of GFF in an area where patients with CD have restricted access to prescriptions and to assess the nutritional composition of GFFs available in comparison with foods containing gluten (FCG).

Design/methodology/approach

Eight food categories that were representative of a range of commonly purchased GFFs were selected. Availability and cost of the cheapest and most expensive branded and non-branded GFFs and gluten containing equivalents were surveyed at physical stores (n=19) and online stores (n=8). The nutritional composition of some of the widely available GFFs identified (n=190) and comparable FCGs (n=218) were calculated using MyFitnessPal.

Findings

None of the budget stores or corner shops surveyed stocked any of the surveyed cereal-based GFFs. Online stores had more availability than physical stores; however, there was no significant difference in cost. GFFs cost, on average, 2.18 times more than FCG. When making nutritional comparisons with gluten-containing food, protein content was lower across 55 per cent of GFF categories. There was significantly less sugar in GF brown bread, crackers, and wholegrain pasta compared with those containing gluten (CG). Another main finding was GF ready-meals contained significantly less salt than ready-meals CG.

Originality/value

Limited resources and perceived wide availability of GF products resulted in reduced GF prescriptions to patients in England. The findings in this study revealed that there is no availability of cereal-based GFFs in budget stores, high cost and limited access to prescriptions can influence adherence to a GF diet and is most likely to affect patients from deprived groups. This study recommends that the prescription of GFF to patients with CD should be continued.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Hye-Jin Paek, Elizabeth Taylor Quilliam, Sookyong Kim, Lorraine J. Weatherspoon, Nora J. Rifon and Mira Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the content of food advergames and the nutritional quality of foods promoted in those advergames with the presence of child…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the content of food advergames and the nutritional quality of foods promoted in those advergames with the presence of child visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study integrates three different sources of data, first, characteristics of the audience from internet audience measurement metrics; second, an analysis of food advergame content; and third, an analysis of the dietary quality of the foods in advergames.

Findings

The results show that 83.2 percent of the total 143 advergames are sponsored by CFBAI participating companies and 79.5 percent of the total 44 advergames reaching children are sponsored by those companies. About 87 percent of the advergames reaching children do not include age limit specification. By contrast, about 71 percent of the advergames reaching children include ad breaks and about half of the advergames reaching children include healthy lifestyle information. Compared to the total, advergames reaching children seem to have a higher level of brand integration. Moreover, most foods that the advergames promote are classified as unhealthy. Finally, the results show that ad breaks and number of brand identifiers are the two significant predictors of food advergames with child unique visitors.

Originality/value

Despite the increased attention to and scrutiny of innovative and interactive food marketing targeting children, little is known about the extent to which such techniques actually reach children, nor about the content and nutritional quality of foods they promote. This study attempts to fill in the gap by focussing on food advergames.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Jill K. Maher, Daria Crawley and Jodi Potter

Children’s fruit intake is a part of healthy nutrition. Several children’s food products “look like” fruit; hence potentially fruit substitutes. Packaging includes brand…

Abstract

Purpose

Children’s fruit intake is a part of healthy nutrition. Several children’s food products “look like” fruit; hence potentially fruit substitutes. Packaging includes brand names, indicators, and health claims related to fruit. These packaging cues may potentially lead to misperceptions of the products. The purpose of this paper is to examine at-risk parents’ substitutions of children’s fruit-branded products for real fruit. At-risk parents are of particular interest as they are a vulnerable segment when it comes to nutrition.

Design/methodology/approach

At-risk families (n=149) completed a survey of their perceptions of children’s nutritional needs, fruit product substitutions, and brand purchase behavior.

Findings

At-risk parents report erroneous perceptions of children’s nutritional fruit intake needs. The results suggest that parents believe fruit-branded products are equivalent to real fruit. Parents’ knowledge and beliefs of fruit equivalency impact purchase decisions.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include potential self-reporting and convenience sampling bias. The study did not attend to the complete product nutritional profile; only on fruit content. Future research should investigate other factors affecting food purchase decisions.

Practical implications

Industry and policy implications include the balance between governmental regulation of food marketing, voluntary corporate responsibility, and the need for education.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into children’s food product packaging on at-risk family perceptions of real fruit substitutes and purchase behaviors. With the market for these products increasing, there is limited research investigating the impact of these products on children’s nutritional intake.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Leopoldo Trieste, Andrea Bazzani, Alessia Amato, Ugo Faraguna and Giuseppe Turchetti

The purpose of this paper is to explore the associations between food literacy, consumer profiling and purchasing behaviour in a sample of Italian consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the associations between food literacy, consumer profiling and purchasing behaviour in a sample of Italian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (N = 194) completed an online survey including personal data, two questionnaires on purchase behaviour and food consumption, the General Trust Scale (GTS), a questionnaire assessing individual chronotype and two scales about food literacy: one investigating nutritional knowledge (short food literacy questionnaire, SFLQ) and the other focussing on procedural skills (self-perceived food literacy scale, SPFL). Associations between food literacy, consumer profiling and purchase behaviour were analysed with linear regression models.

Findings

Participants with specific education in nutrition reported higher scores in food literacy. The final score of food literacy was predicted by a greater attention to nutritional content and nutritional properties of products. Women paid more attention to nutritional properties than men, and they obtained higher scores in SFLQ. Evening types obtained lower scores in SFPL compared to intermediate and morning chronotypes. Body mass index (BMI) was negatively correlated to SPFL score, while it was associated with the easy availability of a product, so that obese (BMI ≥ 30) subjects considered the easy availability of a product more important compared to non-obese ones (BMI < 30).

Originality/value

This study investigates the influence of personal and psychometric variables of consumer profiling on food literacy and consequently on purchase behaviour, paving the way for implementing healthier food consumption policies. These findings reinforce the primacy of specific education in building healthy eating habits.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Edgar Chambers IV, Curtis Maughan, Natarajan Padmanabhan, Sajid Alavi and Akinbode Adedji

Evaluations of food aid products such as corn soy blend (CSB) suggest that higher nutrient-dense weaning foods are needed. CSB at 20 per cent solids was suggested, but it…

Abstract

Purpose

Evaluations of food aid products such as corn soy blend (CSB) suggest that higher nutrient-dense weaning foods are needed. CSB at 20 per cent solids was suggested, but it is too thick for weaning use. The purpose of this paper is to examine if high or low pressure extrusion or a change from corn to sorghum could reduce viscosity without major sensory changes compared to CSB, a widely used fortified blended food (FBF).

Design/methodology/approach

A 2×2 factorial design of grain (corn or sorghum) and extrusion pressure (low or high) was used to produce fortified extruded CSB and sorghum soy blend (SSB) that match new nutritional recommendations at 20 per cent solids. A control CSB sample was also produced. Porridge was made and a descriptive panel measured sensory properties and a Bostwick Consistometer determined viscosity.

Findings

Control CSB was thicker, lumpier, and stickier than the extruded samples. Sorghum samples had more sorghum flavour and corn samples had more corn flavour, but generally other flavour characteristics differed only slightly from the control product. None of the samples were as thin as recommended for infant swallowing, but the extruded sorghum samples were less viscous than other samples.

Originality/value

Nutrient-dense FBFs at high solids content have been recommended but not yet well tested. This paper provides a sensory examination of high solids FBFs with the potential for use as supplementary foods for infants and children.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Sttefanie Yenitza Escobar-López, Angélica Espinoza-Ortega, Ivonne Vizcarra-Bordi and Humberto Thomé-Ortiz

The purpose of this paper is to identify the characteristics of consumers of organic food, based on their motivations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the characteristics of consumers of organic food, based on their motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire based on the Food Choice Questionnaire was applied to a 656 consumers. A multivariate factor analysis and cluster analysis was performed to the data.

Findings

Seven factors were identified: ecological concern; nutritional content; availability of natural products; sensory aspects; certifications, health and confidence; and economic aspects. Resulting clusters were named as: conscious and interested in certification; conscious with no interest in certification; opportunist in transition; unconscious opportunist. There are signs of different consumers. The consumers of these products are characterised by an interaction between hedonic and ethical motivations, where the most important motivation is environmental concern and the least important are the economic aspects.

Research limitations/implications

The reduced number of alternative markets in Mexico limits the amplitude of the research.

Practical implications

The work herein reported is pioneer and contributes to reduce the lack of studies on the motivations and characteristics of consumers of organic foods in Mexico. Findings may set a path for new research in other cultural contexts; as well as for more specific work in Mexico as of consumers of industrialised organic products.

Social implications

Characterising consumers of organic foods will enable the development of these markets.

Originality/value

Social studies of eating habits have taken place in European countries; and several works have been developed in other areas of the world to determine the way in which consumers build their preferences and food choice patterns. In Mexico, specifically in organic foods, studies have focussed in agrarian economics, but the analysis of motivations for choice has not been addressed. Therefore, it is important to research this issue given the relevance for consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Angela Shine, Seamus O’Reilly and Kathleen O’Sullivan

Research findings have suggested that today’s consumers view nutrition in a positive light. The findings of this survey support such evidence. The majority of consumers…

Abstract

Research findings have suggested that today’s consumers view nutrition in a positive light. The findings of this survey support such evidence. The majority of consumers consider diet to be a very important component of their lifestyles and regard nutrition as a positive attribute of food products. A high level of awareness of nutrition labelling is evident among consumers, and 58 per cent of respondents use nutrition labels. However, consumers have to deduce information from nutrition labels in their current format. This proves rather difficult as knowledge of a balanced diet is quite low. Therefore, consumers find it difficult to implement current dietary advice through the use of nutrition labels, and only 17 per cent of the sample surveyed use labels for this purpose. Social networks and the “popular” media were found to be the most used sources of nutrition information, the medical profession was seen as a source of “cure” rather than prevention and a negligible percentage of the sample used official government information channels. Concludes that nutrition labels have a role to play; however, the food industry needs to respond to consumer needs and education/information provision needs to be improved.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Mariantonietta Fiore, Crescenzio Gallo, Evangelos Tsoukatos and Piermichele La Sala

Healthy and safety food issues are more and more becoming the purchasing process core of conscious consumer. “Type 1” wheat flour means higher protein and ash content. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthy and safety food issues are more and more becoming the purchasing process core of conscious consumer. “Type 1” wheat flour means higher protein and ash content. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attributes usually referred to the characteristics of wheat flour known to consumers and at implementing a predictive model of purchasing that allows to make correct decisions without the necessary experience of a real human expert.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to investigate the research aims of the paper, an online survey was carried out and conducted by means of the Google Forms in the detection time January-April 2016. The online survey collected responses from 467 Italian respondents asked to give feedback about their buying habits of various types of flour. The responses were analyzed through a data mining approach. This paper implements predictive analytics to create a statistical model of future behavior by means of a machine learning algorithms.

Findings

In line with recent healthy and dynamic trends in the food industry, conscious consumer seems to be willing to pay a price for “type 1” wheat flour that is four times higher than the price related to the basic types of wheat flour.

Social implications

Consumer seems not to know well the “type 1” wheat flour and its healthy characteristics; then, it should be crucial to implement promotional strategies and marketing hand in hand. Promotion can be a key element in putting across the health benefits of special kinds of wheat flour.

Originality/value

Highlighting health issues about the “type 1” wheat flour gives insights and sheds some light on the crucial need of changing eating and purchasing behavior. Then, originality of this paper can be found in the used predictive algorithm of the artificial intelligence.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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