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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Stojan Kostanjevec, Janez Jerman and Verena Koch

Children's eating habits are influenced by numerous social and individual factors. The present study aimed to evaluate the connection between nutrition knowledge of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Children's eating habits are influenced by numerous social and individual factors. The present study aimed to evaluate the connection between nutrition knowledge of children and their eating habits as well as their attitudes towards healthy eating habits.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study included 630 11-year-old children from 27 randomly selected Slovenian schools. During the research, children attended the sixth grade of the nine-year elementary school and on average were subject to 38.6 h of mandatory nutritional contents, which are planned in the curriculum of home economics. At the end of the school year, nutrition knowledge was checked with a knowledge test consisting of 27 questions. Considering the achieved results, children were classified into three knowledge categories: low, fairly good, and good nutrition knowledge. Children's eating habits were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire, while the five-degree Likert scale was used to assess their attitudes to healthy eating habits. Differences in children's eating habits and attitudes in reference to the category of knowledge were determined through analysis of variance.

Findings

The results demonstrated that children with better nutrition knowledge have healthier eating habits and a more positive attitude towards them than children with poor nutrition knowledge.

Originality/value

The study results demonstrate the link between children's nutrition knowledge and attitudes on the one hand and eating habits on the other which justifies the importance of providing formal and informal nutrition education to children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Veljko Marinković and Jovana Lazarević

The COVID-19 virus pandemic has strongly influenced consumer behaviour worldwide. This paper aims to investigate how risk perceptions and precautions related to COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 virus pandemic has strongly influenced consumer behaviour worldwide. This paper aims to investigate how risk perceptions and precautions related to COVID-19 virus influence consumer eating habits and consequently, behaviour during shopping for food. Also, research tends to identify changes in consumer eating habits resulting from the current pandemic situation.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 237 consumers from Serbia were online surveyed during November 2020. Starting from the methodology of the SOR model (Mehrabian and Russell, 1974), the questionnaire consists of seven-point Likert scale statements that measure risk perceptions and precautions as stimulus (S), eating habits as an organism (O) and food choice, precautions during shopping for food and food purchasing patterns as a response (S).

Findings

Research results confirm the difference in consumers' eating habits during and before a pandemic. Also, results indicate that perceived risk and precautions related to the COVID-19 virus have a statistically significant influence on consumers' eating habits which have changed during a pandemic, finally resulting in significant effects on consumers' food shopping behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this study are observing only a few aspects related to COVID-19 virus pandemic and consumer food shopping behaviour, as well as measuring precautions, perceived risk and food shopping behaviour at one point in time besides the fact that pandemic situation constantly changes.

Originality/value

The study indicates that food manufacturers should pay attention to the consumers' eating habits and food shopping behaviour changes under the circumstances of COVID-19 virus pandemic. Identified changes can be used as opportunities to gain a competitive advantage on the market.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Teija Räihä, Kerttu Tossavainen, Hannele Turunen, Jorma Enkenberg and Pirjo Halonen

The purpose of this study was to examine Finnish seventh‐graders' (13 to 14 years old) nutrition health attitudes, perceptions of skills, reported behaviour and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine Finnish seventh‐graders' (13 to 14 years old) nutrition health attitudes, perceptions of skills, reported behaviour and perceptions of families' and friends' nutrition health‐related behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The research data were collected in a baseline situation through a structured questionnaire presented to seventh‐graders (n=188) in four secondary schools, both rural and urban, in Eastern Finland. Two of the schools were experimental and two were control schools. All schools implemented nutrition health education according to the objectives of the national curriculum for basic education. Additionally, the experimental schools were developing their nutrition health education by using an ICT‐based learning environment.

Findings

The results show that seventh‐grade girls had a greater probability to follow healthy eating habits compared to seventh‐grade boys. Parental support had an important role in seventh‐grade adolescents' healthy eating habits and food choices. Additionally, adolescents' own healthy food preparation and choice skills were associated with healthy and versatile eating among seventh‐graders. As expected, no significant differences between the experimental and control schools were found at this baseline situation.

Originality/value

In Finland, strategies and curricula have been developed in schools to encourage children and adolescents to choose a healthy diet and to prepare healthy meals. Having high‐quality school lunches available to all and practical home economics as a school subject are good examples of well‐implemented nutrition health education, which could serve as model for nutrition health promotion worldwide.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2020

José António C. Santos, Margarida Custódio Santos, Luis Nobre Pereira, Greg Richards and Luis Caiado

Little is known about how tourists’ eating habits change between everyday life and holidays. This study aims to identify market segments based on changes in food…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about how tourists’ eating habits change between everyday life and holidays. This study aims to identify market segments based on changes in food consumption and experiences of a sun-and-sea destination’s local food. The authors evaluate to what extent tourists consume local food and assess the contribution of local food experiences to the tourists’ overall experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population was all tourists visiting the Algarve in the Summer 2018 and included both domestic and international sun-and-sea tourists. A sample of 378 valid questionnaires was collected. Data analysis included descriptive analysis, statistical tests and cluster analysis.

Findings

Cluster analysis identified three segments: non-foodies, selective foodies and local gastronomy foodies. Results indicate that tourists change their eating habits during holidays, eating significantly more seafood and fish and less legumes, meat, fast food and cereals and their derivatives. International and domestic sun-and-sea tourists reported that eating local food contributes significantly to their overall tourism experience.

Practical implications

Sun-and-sea destinations should promote the offer of local dishes, especially those that include locally produced fish and seafood, to improve the tourist experience, differentiate the destination and increase sustainability.

Originality/value

The authors address three identified research gaps: a posteriori segmentation based on tourists’ food consumption behaviour; measurement of changes in eating practices between home and in a sun-and-sea destination; and assessment of the role of food experiences to overall tourism experience of tourists visiting a sun-and-sea destination.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, Gunn Helene Arsky, Mia Brandhøj, Maria Nyberg, Eva Roos and Bent Egberg Mikkelsen

The purpose of this paper is to review national experiences and policy initiatives within worksite eating in four Nordic countries, in order to compare the experiences and…

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505

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review national experiences and policy initiatives within worksite eating in four Nordic countries, in order to compare the experiences and identify important lessons and needs for future research, experiments and governmental regulation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on national reviews of analyses of worksite eating and initiatives regarding policy, research and experiments in relation to worksite eating. The national experiences are compared.

Findings

The paper shows awareness in all four countries about the role of the worksite in the shaping of dietary habits of the employees and some experiments with healthier worksite eating schemes. Blue‐collar employees, employees with working hours outside normal working hours and employees with shifting worksites are likely to be offered less organised and less healthy food schemes. Worksites' experiments with healthier worksite eating schemes based on employee participation can change worksite eating substantially, including at blue‐collar worksites. However, the generalising of findings to other worksites not participating in the experiments seems limited. There is need for more research in the embedding of experiments.

Originality/value

The paper has value as the first cross‐national review covering four of the Nordic countries in the area of worksite eating and attempts to create healthier worksite eating. By combining research findings and policy initiatives from four countries, the paper gives access to a big pool of knowledge, which can inspire future research and policy initiatives, including future experiments and future governmental regulation.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Anna Sylwia Kowalska and Agnieszka Tarnowska

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the eating habits of students in the field of management and engineering of food products compared to students from faculties not…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the eating habits of students in the field of management and engineering of food products compared to students from faculties not related to food science. Furthermore, another aim is to conduct gender-wise assessment to determine the type of eating habit, i.e., careful or binge eating.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved 400 students from all years of study. The survey was conducted in 2017–2018 and the selection of the sample was intentional. The research used a questionnaire form. Additionally, χ2 test was performed to assess the statistical independence of characteristics.

Findings

It is found that most students who pledge proper nutrition are women. The majority of respondents ate 3–4 meals in day and regular consumption of breakfast was declared among 42 percent of respondents. The consumption of sweet snacks between meals is reaffirmed by the half of the respondents. Students of the food sciences more often than others believed that they eat healthier and more regularly, although students of non-food directions most often declared intake of five or more meals a day.

Research limitations/implications

An important limitation of the conducted study is a relatively small research sample. It consisted of university students from one of the largest academic centers in Poland. The results cannot be generalized to all students in this country. In the future, a similar survey should be conducted on a larger scale and cover all similar fields of management and engineering of food products in Poland. In addition, it would be worth expanding the research and examine graduates who found employment in the food industry.

Practical implications

The results of the conducted research are a good source of information on the differences in the way of feeding studying women and men. While such studies are not very revealing, the comparison between students in food and non-food fields can be considered a novelty. The described results can be used by the students themselves, but above all, by the authorities of universities conducting food science programs.

Social implications

The students do not eat properly which can lead to nutritional deficiencies and can deteriorate mental and physical endurance damaging overall health.

Originality/value

The described research is important due to the observed deteriorating eating habits and growing overweight of young adults in developed countries like Poland. They show that education of food technologists, even at the academic level, does not always allow to avoid mistakes in their own nutrition.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Antonella Samoggia, Aldo Bertazzoli, Vaiva Hendrixson, Maria Glibetic and Anne Arvola

The purpose of the chapter is to explore the relation between women’s healthy eating intention and food attitudes, beliefs, perceptions, and barriers with a focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the chapter is to explore the relation between women’s healthy eating intention and food attitudes, beliefs, perceptions, and barriers with a focus on the effect of women’s income differences.

Methodology/approach

The research applies the Theory of Planned Behavior, including attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, perceived barriers, and ability opportunity resources. Close-ended survey responses of 704 women between ages 25 and 65 years, affluent and at-risk-of-poverty women in three EU-member countries were analyzed.

Findings

Women are mostly positively inclined towards healthy eating, and income does not differentiate women’s inclination. Influencing factors are perceived behavioral control, attitudes towards healthy eating, subjective norms, and level of knowledge regarding healthy food. Barriers, when present, are similar for lower or higher income women and relate to routinized family habits and food affordability and availability.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should thoroughly investigate family network and structure features, with a focus on family food preferences and habits.

Social and practical implications

Encouraging women’s healthy behavior also impacts children and men, and vice-versa. There is need to target all family components with enjoyable, self-rewarding, emotionally gratifying, and pleasant tasting food.

Originality/value

Income is an overestimated driver in healthy food choices. Women are strongly influenced by personal and environmental factors, mainly personal control, feelings, and family habits.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Mi-Kyeong Choi, Yu-Jin Cho, Myung-Hee Kim and Yun Jung Bae

The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in night eating status according to adolescents’ body mass index (BMI).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in night eating status according to adolescents’ body mass index (BMI).

Design/methodology/approach

This was a cross-sectional study that included a total of 688 middle-school students. The subjects were categorized as underweight, normal weight and overweight according to their BMI, and their night eating intake patterns, night eating menu preference and intake frequency were compared and analyzed.

Findings

With regard to their night eating frequency, 39.8 per cent replied almost never, while 24.3 per cent replied once a week and less and 22.5 per cent replied two to three times a week. Among 11 night eating menus, the preference for fast foods, confectioneries, street foods and noodles was significantly higher in the underweight group than in the overweight group. The intake frequency of night eating menus such as fast foods, confectioneries and breads increased in the following order: overweight, normal and underweight group. The underweight group had a higher frequency of night eating, and they preferred to eat snacks more frequently from their night eating menu.

Originality/value

In conclusion, it is necessary to form positive dietary habits including nighttime eating for proper dietary management of adolescents.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Amanda Nascimento and Giovanna Fiates

The purpose of this paper is to investigate television viewing habits of children from low-income families, their consumption of fruits, vegetables and snacks, as well as…

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373

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate television viewing habits of children from low-income families, their consumption of fruits, vegetables and snacks, as well as their spending habits.

Design/methodology/approach

11 focus groups were conducted with 54 public school students aged seven to ten years, divided by sex and age. Transcription of the discussions was processed by content analysis. Family income was indirectly assessed through classification of parents' occupations.

Findings

The habit of watching television was very present in the students' routines, as was eating in front of the television set. Eating fruits and vegetables was a habit, but frequent consumption of snack foods was also reported. Students had money of their own to spend independently and did it mostly on snacks. Parental interference over their habits was not perceived by the students. Television watching was a regular activity not only for the children, but also for their families. Even though research design could not establish a causal relationship, consumption and acquisition of unhealthy food items was routine, as well as watching television.

Research limitations/implications

Results are of local nature and findings may differ from those of other regions or countries. Also, students were conveniently selected, and as volunteers they may have been more likely to have an interest in matters related to nutrition, or could have misreported their eating behaviours to be more socially desirable than they actually were.

Originality/value

Qualitative investigation regarding television viewing habits, food choices and purchases of Brazilian low-income children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Amélie Guèvremont

This research sheds light on behavioral change by demonstrating the transformative power of a brand on the process of eating behavioral change. The selected brand is Three

Abstract

Purpose

This research sheds light on behavioral change by demonstrating the transformative power of a brand on the process of eating behavioral change. The selected brand is Three Times a Day (a culinary blog whose mission is to encourage a healthier diet). This study aims to identify food-related behavioral changes as a result of consumers’ relationship with this brand and identify antecedents to such changes.

Design/methodology/approach

A netnography of the brand online community and 14 individual in-depth interviews were conducted.

Findings

Netnography results identify four categories of behavioral changes emerging from the relationship with the brand (e.g. choosing healthier/more varied foods, developing an interest in cooking and adopting a healthier lifestyle). Analysis of the individual interviews substantiate the role of brand attachment as a driver of positive change and identify three antecedents: brand-self connection (through past, actual and ideal self), brand exposure and satisfaction of individual needs (i.e. autonomy, competence and relatedness).

Research limitations/implications

Results enrich the literature on behavioral change and highlight the positive role of a brand in the context of improving eating habits. Findings extend the understanding of the consequences of attachment beyond its influence at the attitudinal level by focusing on concrete consumer behavior.

Social implications

It is recognized that despite good intentions, individuals keep making poor food choices. This important issue is associated with several diseases and increasing social costs. This research explores how to influence consumers in adopting better eating habits.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine the power of a food-related brand to enhance positive eating practices and improve diet.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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