Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Khondoker Abdul Mottaleb and Dil Bahadur Rahut

International commodity prices have escalated to an unprecedented level since 2008. Although commodity prices have declined recently, prices are still high compared to the…

Abstract

Purpose

International commodity prices have escalated to an unprecedented level since 2008. Although commodity prices have declined recently, prices are still high compared to the pre-2008 levels. Combining this market phenomenon with Bangladesh Government’s Household Income and Expenditure Survey (HIES) data sets HIES 2005 and HIES 2010, and applying the seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) estimation process, the purpose of this paper is to examine paddy rice marketing, and the cereal and non-cereal food expenditure behavior of rural smallholders in Bangladesh under rising commodity prices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses information collected by the Government of Bangladesh and applies two-step Heckman-type selection model estimation procedure, first to estimate total rice production by the rice production self-sufficiency status of the household. Second, the study estimates the paddy marketing behavior by the households by their rice self-sufficiency status under rising commodity price regime applying SUR estimation process combing with Heckman’s selection model estimation procedure.

Findings

Empirical findings demonstrate that there was no positive assertion between higher paddy rice prices and paddy rice marketing by the rural smallholders. Rather, under the rising commodity price regime, smallholders significantly reduced consumption expenditure on high food value-enriched non-cereal food items to adjust to the market shocks.

Research limitations/implications

This is a Bangladesh-based case study. Individual country-level case studies should be conducted in order to generalize the findings of the present study.

Originality/value

The present study warns that the market volatility may discourage farm households to market their cereals more due to uncertain future. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to explore the cereal marketing behavior of the farm households in Bangladesh under commodity price hikes by the rice production self-sufficiency status of the farm households.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Anna Maria Siega‐Riz and Barry M. Popkin

The food pattern that includes ready‐to‐eat (RTE) cereals at breakfast is associated with important reductions in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and increases…

Downloads
1189

Abstract

The food pattern that includes ready‐to‐eat (RTE) cereals at breakfast is associated with important reductions in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and increases the likelihood of an individual meeting the recommended dietary allowances for iron and calcium for three sub‐populations studied (Anglos, African‐Americans, and Hispanics). Beverages, fruit, cereals, breads, and egg items represent the major components of breakfast. RTE cereals were consumed in 30 per cent of the breakfasts; they were fifth in the number of grams consumed per capita. Consumers of RTE cereals consumed a very different pattern of food from non‐consumers of RTE cereals. Individuals aged five and older with three days of dietary data from the US 1989‐91 Continuing Survey of Food for Individuals Intake were used for the analysis, n = 9,957. All breakfasts were combined (n = 26,271).

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Amrik S. Sohal and Marcia Perry

The purpose of the paper is to provide a contextual basis for the supply chain activity of the generic Australian cereal products supply chain. It identifies the…

Downloads
5846

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide a contextual basis for the supply chain activity of the generic Australian cereal products supply chain. It identifies the business‐environment factors underpinning the cereal products supply chain efficiency. It also further highlighted the complex nature of the extended supply chain and all the factors to be considered in its management. The approach to the topic is that of developing a holistic overview of the extended supply chain, its networks and its business‐environment influences in order to understand the complex reality of issues that a supply chain manager must deal with in order to optimise efficiencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was used in the study, involving an examination of supply chain practices throughout the cereal product supply chain, determined through interviews with players at all stages from seed to supermarket supply. Identification of key business‐environment influences impacting on the cereal products supply chain was achieved through thematic examination of the responses and comparison of the findings with literature relating to the Australian business‐environment. Field research activity included semi‐structured interviews throughout the supply chain for mapping and examining the status of supply chain networks and practices.

Findings

The business‐environment factor findings, depicted in a model, concerned the impact of globalisation and demand trends; industry complexity and realignment; power relationships; delivery imperatives; the competitive supply chain imperative; the information economy; industry accountability requirements; freight challenges; supply chain labour requirements and climatic conditions affecting crop yields.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited in that it represented a sample of viewpoints/supply chain activity in the Australian cereal products industry and lacked the comprehensiveness of a full industry study covering the entire gamut of regional, crop‐wide and circumstantial influencing factors.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the influence of the identified business‐environment factors on supply chain activity and points the way for supply chain managers in the cereal product industry to be aware of broad contextual factors as well as their own immediate operating environment. The identified business‐environment influences present strategic challenges to players throughout the cereal products supply chain. A globally responsive cereal products supply chain will need to strategically align itself with the wider Australian grain industry, food industry and government to meet future market requirements. It will also need to maintain a constant supply chain dialogue focusing on common goals, being aware of constraints and future challenges.

Originality/value

This research paper is original and of value to supply chain management theory in presenting a wide contextual view of the supply chain and hence supply chain management.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Huan Yu and Joe Bogue

This research aims to generate consumer knowledge to facilitate the development of new product concepts with optimal product design attributes for new fermented functional…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to generate consumer knowledge to facilitate the development of new product concepts with optimal product design attributes for new fermented functional cereal beverages (FFCBs) with high market potential.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed a sequential mixed research approach which integrated both qualitative and quantitative methods. A total of 12 in‐depth interviews and three focus groups were carried out to identify product concepts for new FFCBs. A conjoint model (n=299) was then developed to evaluate product‐specific factors that influenced consumer acceptance of FFCBs.

Findings

Potential target consumers of FFCBs were more likely to be young females who had relatively high educational and income levels. “Flavour” and “health/nutritional claim” were found to be the most important product attributes for consumers. The simulation analysis predicted two FFCB concepts for target consumers.

Research limitations/implications

As there is a limited range of FFCBs on the market, the concept of FFCBs may be novel to consumers. Further research would be beneficial that closely integrates the strategic marketing of FFCBs with sensory analysis conducted on a range of these beverages.

Practical implications

During the early stages of the new product development (NPD) process, a market‐oriented research methodology can help optimise product concepts in terms of product attributes that drive consumer acceptance.

Originality/value

This paper provides an important insight into the significance of market‐oriented knowledge generation techniques for the development of new cereal‐based functional foods. It provides market‐oriented information on FFCBs which can be valuable for food manufacturers to maximise NPD performance and to gain competitive advantage in the functional beverages market.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Tara Shankar Shaw and Sridhar Telidevara

Indian households having the below poverty line (BPL) ration card receive rice, wheat, sugar and kerosene from the Indian Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS) at…

Abstract

Purpose

Indian households having the below poverty line (BPL) ration card receive rice, wheat, sugar and kerosene from the Indian Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS) at subsidized rates. The paper uses the National Sample Survey Organization's consumption expenditure survey for the 61st round to study the causal effect of the BPL ration card on BPL households' calorie consumption. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This causal effect is estimated by comparing per-capita-per-day calorie consumption of the BPL households having BPL card with that of a matched counterfactual BPL household from the same state not having BPL card, using stratified propensity score matching.

Findings

The BPL ration card was found to increase calorie consumption from cereals and decrease calorie consumption from non-cereal food items without affecting the overall calorie consumption of household. Thus, TPDS induces households to consume more cereals and less non-cereal without significantly changing the overall calorie consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The research methodology controls for selection bias due to observable variables. Further, research needed to devise experimental set up to control for the selection bias due to unobserved variables.

Originality/value

The paper uses the targeting error in identifying BPL households in TPDS as a quasi-experiment set up to study the causal effect of the BPL ration card.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Emily C. Crofton, Anne Markey and Amalia G.M. Scannell

The aim of this paper is to examine consumers' perceptions and expectations towards healthy snacks, with particular emphasis on the cereal snack market, and to explore new…

Downloads
3394

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine consumers' perceptions and expectations towards healthy snacks, with particular emphasis on the cereal snack market, and to explore new areas of opportunities for healthy snacks by identifying consumer needs and wants.

Design/methodology/approach

Six focus group discussions were conducted to generate attitudinal data across three different adult consumer groups.

Findings

Results revealed that consumers expected a healthy snack to contain low levels of calories, fat, salt and sugar, and to contain high levels of whole‐grain, oats, bran, nuts, seeds, pulses and fruit, e.g. blueberries, cranberries, gogi berries. Additionally, healthy snacks were required to be free from any artificial colours, sweeteners and flavours. Major factors encouraging healthy snack consumption included reduced risk of weight gain, diabetes, heart burn and bloating. Conversely, perceived taste, portion size, the lack of available convenient nutritional snacks, accessibility and confusion over the credibility of the “healthy product” tag were the main factors preventing healthy consumption in the adult population examined. Consumers expressed a desire for a wider choice of filling snacks with specific health benefits for a variety of usage occasions, particularly those with associated health claims such as “high fibre”, “omega 3 for mental health” and “reduces cholesterol”.

Research limitations/implications

The study sample size was not extensive and was limited to a small geographical spread of Dublin and Meath on the East coast of Ireland. A more representative sample of the entire Irish population could be the basis for further research.

Practical implications

These findings increase the understanding of current expectations of the Irish adult consumer regarding healthy snack foods. They also highlight the potential new product development opportunities for snack food manufacturers to explore.

Originality/value

The present paper focuses specifically on healthy snacks and contributes to a limited amount of existing literature by providing consumer research for the development of new healthy snack foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Kolawole Ogundari

The aim of this study is in twofolds. First, to take a critical look at nutrient consumed and its trends and second, to examine the relationship between share of nutrient…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is in twofolds. First, to take a critical look at nutrient consumed and its trends and second, to examine the relationship between share of nutrient consumed across selected food groups and per capita income in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses seemingly unrelated regressions.

Findings

The result of the first objective reveals that the average calorie, protein and fat intakes were still below the recommended daily allowance since the 1960s as diets in Nigeria remained very much cereal-based over the years. Also, the results of objective two show that calorie, protein, and fat share of animal products respond positively but inelastic to the per capita income growth in Nigeria over the years.

Originality/value

Contrary to previous studies, the present study is designed not to fit aggregated nutrient demand from various food items as a function of income, but to relate the nutrient share of each homogenous and heterogeneous food product categories to the aggregated nutrient intake from these food groups and per capita income in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Case study
Publication date: 1 August 2014

Eric D. Yordy, Nita Paden and Katlin Bryant

In 2010, approximately one-third of US children and adolescents were classified as at least overweight, with 17 percent classified as obese. In addition to other causes…

Abstract

Synopsis

In 2010, approximately one-third of US children and adolescents were classified as at least overweight, with 17 percent classified as obese. In addition to other causes, the marketing and advertising of food directly to children was identified by a Task Force on Childhood Obesity as a contributing factor. As a result, food industries began to self-regulate. Consumer advocacy organizations developed guidelines for advertising products targeted to children. Cereal companies, such as General Mills (GM), struggled with whether or not to adopt those standards. GM began to change both marketing and product advertising in small ways. The changes were considered steps in the right direction but GM continued to be under scrutiny of advocacy groups. This case addresses the struggle of General Mills to make changes to product nutritional content and/or marketing and to address the societal concern about childhood obesity while also meeting responsibilities to consumers and shareholders.

Research methodology

The case was researched utilizing secondary data – all materials are readily available to the public. There is no disguise of any actual person or entity and no relationship between the authors and the organizations or individuals mentioned in the case. Frequent sources include the General Foods, Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative and Center for Science in the Public Interest web pages.

Relevant courses and levels

This case could be used at an undergraduate or graduate level. Legal Environment of Business, Business Ethics and any Marketing course.

Theoretical basis

The ethics frameworks in most business law or ethics textbooks may be used to discuss the dilemma identified in this case. This Instructor's Manual uses Hosmer's model. Hosmer (2008), The Ethics of Management: A Multidisciplinary Approach, 7th ed.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Winston Moore and Sunielle Stanford

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the main determinants of dependency on food aid programmes. Food aid may take the form of a loan, a sale below market price or…

Downloads
1528

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the main determinants of dependency on food aid programmes. Food aid may take the form of a loan, a sale below market price or a current transfer. Food aid programmes across the globe are generally designed to provide short‐term assistance to countries. However, many countries have developed a dependence on food aid assistance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper estimates cross‐sectional regressions using a database containing 116 developing countries over the period 1970‐2003. Bayesian averaging of classical estimates is employed to identify the robust determinants of dependency.

Findings

The study finds that the top two determinants of food aid dependence (both cereals and non‐cereals) were food production and the frequency of droughts affecting the country. Food inflation, population density, crop yields, the amount of arable land per capita, the rule of law and the number of armed conflicts were also robustly related to aid dependence.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that international donors should focus primarily on offsetting the substitution effect of aid on local production as well as implement systems to partially offset the negative effects of droughts, if they are to break the cycle of dependence on food aid.

Originality/value

Previous studies have investigated the effects of a large number of other variables. The findings from these papers were somewhat conflicting due to differences in model specification. To identify the variables that have a robust relationship with food aid dependence, whatever the model specification, the Bayesian averaging of classical estimates approach proposed by Sala‐i‐Martin et al. is employed.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Chengsi Zhang, Chunming Meng and Lisa Getz

China has witnessed low and stable consumer price inflation in conjunction with high and volatile food price inflation over the past decade. The purpose of this paper is…

Downloads
1064

Abstract

Purpose

China has witnessed low and stable consumer price inflation in conjunction with high and volatile food price inflation over the past decade. The purpose of this paper is to examine questions about whether or not the link between consumer price inflation and food price inflation has weakened and the determinants of consumer price inflation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores these questions by estimating error correction terms for monetary and external sectors using the Johansen cointegration method.

Findings

Empirical results suggest that the link between consumer price inflation and food prices has not been weakened, food price inflation, especially cereal price inflation, remains a significant driving force for overall consumer price inflation, and international food prices also play a significant role in determining China's inflation dynamics.

Originality/value

The paper construct a multivariate dynamic model that features the link between consumer price inflation and its potential driving variables. It also develops error correction models for food price, non-food price and consumer price inflation, which can accommodate dynamic interactions among the underlying variables.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000