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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Nicky Mendoza and Norma McGough

This paper gives an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of coeliac disease and associated disorders. It also gives some background to gluten…

Abstract

Purpose of the paper

This paper gives an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of coeliac disease and associated disorders. It also gives some background to gluten testing in foods and developments in identification of gluten‐free foods at consumer level.

Design/methodology/approach

The most up‐to‐date literature on various aspects of the disease have been considered and included in the report.

Findings

Coeliac disease is now known to affect one in 100 of the population, including both adults and children. As more is understood about the pathophysiology of the disease and antibody screening techniques improve rates of diagnosis are increasing. The biopsy is still required for a firm diagnosis. The range of symptoms that is now recognised is far wider than previously thought, but symptoms are still often missed, or mis‐diagnosed as IBS. The treatment for coeliac disease is the gluten‐free diet, which controls the symptoms and reduces the risk of complications such as osteoporosis and gut cancer. Prescriptions of gluten‐free foods are known to improve adherence to the diet, and with the range of suitable foods in supermarkets increasing rapidly, gluten‐free living is becoming easier.

Originality/value

Information on several aspects of coeliac disease are presented in this paper to give the non‐expert a general, up‐to‐date overview of the disease.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Denise A. Copelton

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work…

Abstract

Purpose

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work within families.

Methodology/approach

This chapter is based on a grounded theory analysis of field research with five celiac support groups and 80 in-depth interviews. I interviewed 15 adult men and 56 adult women with celiac, plus nine additional family members.

Findings

Gendered care work norms place the onus of responsibility for gluten-free feeding work on women, multiplying time spent planning, shopping, and preparing meals. Women employ distinct gendered strategies to accommodate the gluten-free diet. Following a strategy of integration, women tailor family meals to meet other diagnosed family members’ dietary needs and the entire family’s taste preferences. However, when women themselves have celiac, they follow a pattern of deferential subordination, not allowing their own dietary needs to alter family meals. Thus, women continue to prepare family meals as a form of care for others, even when their medical needs justify putting themselves first.

Originality/value

Social support is a key determinant of compliance with necessary lifestyle and dietary changes in chronic illness. However, little research explores the gendered dynamics within families accounting for the link between social support and dietary compliance. I show how gendered care work norms benefit husbands and children with celiac, while simultaneously disadvantaging women with celiac.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Sadia Chishty, Monika and Nimali Singh

The aim of the study was to compare the nutritional status of children having celiac disease (CD) with those not having the disease in the age group of 7-12 years…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to compare the nutritional status of children having celiac disease (CD) with those not having the disease in the age group of 7-12 years. Children not having CD were from first- and second-degree siblings of the children affected to match for family and environment. In Indian celiac pediatric population, studies on nutritional status of celiac children and comparisons with their siblings as reference have not been reported.

Design/methodology/approach

Children with CD (n = 50) and without CD (n = 25) were matched for age and were purposively selected. Nutritional assessment included anthropometry, biochemical, clinical and nutrient intake. Weight and height measurements were recorded as per the standardized techniques. Biochemical investigations were done by skilled technicians. A two-day 24-h dietary recall method was used for calculation of nutrient intake. The observations were categorized as celiac and non-celiac children and pre-adolescents in age group of 7-9 years and 10-12 years.

Findings

The issues of being underweight and of low height according to age among celiac children were rampant. The non-celiac children were comparatively taller than children with CD. The hemoglobin and serum iron were significantly lower in celiac than non-celiac group (p < 0.01). Energy intake was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in celiac pre-adolescents as compared to non-celiac children (7-9 years). The protein intake was higher in non-celiac children, and the difference was highly significant (p < 0.01). The fat consumption was higher in celiac pre-adolescents. The nutritional status of celiac children was poor as compared to non-celiac children.

Originality/value

The present study is an attempt to compare the nutritional status of celiac children with their siblings.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Zainab Laheri and Jan Mei Soon

Coeliac disease (CD) is a prevalent autoimmune disorder, affecting 1 in 100 of all individuals in the UK. Currently, the only treatment for CD is the complete avoidance of…

Abstract

Purpose

Coeliac disease (CD) is a prevalent autoimmune disorder, affecting 1 in 100 of all individuals in the UK. Currently, the only treatment for CD is the complete avoidance of gluten, a protein commonly found in wheat, rye and barley. The use of alternative grains (AG) is highly recommended to individuals with CD to improve and diversify their diet. The purpose of this paper is to determine the current knowledge of the gluten-free diet (GFD), consumption rates of AG and awareness of AG, for individuals diagnosed with CD.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 100 participants were recruited via local coeliac support groups as well as an “Allergy and Free From Show”, to participate in a survey. Consent was obtained from all organisations and all individual participants, prior to collecting data. The questionnaire consists of ten questions, related to participants’ demographic characteristics, knowledge of gluten-free food (GFF) and AG and consumption rate of AG. χ2 analyses were conducted to compare the variables between gender and time of diagnosis.

Findings

Overall, both genders possessed good knowledge of the GFD. Yogurt, vinegar and oats resulted in the highest incorrect responses. It was found that females possessed better knowledge of both GFF and AG. Rice, quinoa and corn were amongst the most popular AG consumed whilst job’s tears, fonio and sorghum were the least consumed grains. Females reported a higher consumption rate of AG than males. Additionally, those more recently diagnosed had poorer knowledge of the GFD, reduced consumption rates of AG and poor awareness of AG.

Originality/value

It can be suggested that the incorporation of AG into the diet can prove beneficial for coeliacs and that both knowledge and education play a fundamental role in determining consumption rates amongst individuals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Morad Guennouni, Noureddine El Khoudri, Aicha Bourrouhouate and Abderraouf Hilali

The prevalence of celiac disease is increasing alarmingly. The only and effective treatment for this disease is a strict gluten-free diet Efforts have been made by…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevalence of celiac disease is increasing alarmingly. The only and effective treatment for this disease is a strict gluten-free diet Efforts have been made by industrialists to produce gluten-free products (GFPs); however, their low availability and high cost, compared to gluten-containing products (GCPs) still remain among the factors that cause gluten-free adherence failure. The objective of this survey is to compare the availability and cost of GFPs in supermarkets in two Moroccan cities, Marrakech and Casablanca, and on e-commerce platforms and see how they compare to GCPs.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional study that targets supermarkets and e-commerce websites that sell GFPs food and their GCPs equivalents. The price of each product is recorded per 100 g.

Findings

The study surveys 271 GFPs and their 579 GCPs equivalents that were subsequently divided into six categories. The “GF Cookie and Cakes” category came on top of the list of products. GFPs were more available on e-commerce websites than at supermarkets in two Moroccan cities (p = 0.003). The GFPs are 364% (115–1309%) more expensive than their GCPs counterparts. Also, the authors recorded a significant price difference between GFPs sold in supermarkets and those sold on online.

Originality/value

This study reveals that labeled GFPs are less available and more expensive than their equivalents GCPs in Morocco. This affects GF diet adherence and quality of life of celiac patients. The patients who use GFPs need financial compensation from the national government.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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