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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Senanu Kwasi Kutor, Emmanuel Kyeremeh, Bernard Owusu, Daniel Amoak and Temitope Oluwaseyi Ishola

This paper examines how one group of frontline health workers (nurses) amid coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic perceive the Government of Ghana (GOG)'s decision to ease…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how one group of frontline health workers (nurses) amid coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic perceive the Government of Ghana (GOG)'s decision to ease the lockdown restrictions when cases were increasing. This paper contributes to the literature on Igor Grossman's concept of wise reasoning and its applicability to COVID-19 management decision-making by political leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed an exploratory qualitative design. The decision to adopt qualitative method is linked to the paucity of research on wise reasoning, political leadership and COVID-19. The paper draws on qualitative online survey with 42 nurses located in Accra Metropolis, Ghana.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that a confluence of research participants perceived the government's act of easing the lockdown restrictions to be in bad faith on account of (1) nonrecognition of different perspectives and viewpoints from stakeholders and interest groups; (2) rising number of cases which naturally make the decision to lift the restriction unwise; (3) concerns about the prioritization of peripheral issues over citizens' health and (4) concerns about limited and robust health facilities and their implications.

Research limitations/implications

The key claims must be assessed against the limitations of the study. First, the study is an exploratory study and, therefore, not intended for a generalization purpose. Second, the research participants are highly educated, and the responses in this study are skewed toward them.

Originality/value

The paper is novel in seeking to explore wise reasoning and political leadership during a global pandemic such as COVID-19. This exploratory study demonstrates that COVID-19, though devastating and causing havoc, presents an opportunity to test Igor Grossmann's wise reasoning framework about decision-making by political leaders. This extends the literature on wise reasoning beyond the discipline of psychology (the fact that all the authors are geographers) and Global North to Global South since the data for this study are gathered in Ghana.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Emmanuel Yeboah-Assiamah, Kwame Asamoah and Thomas Agyekum Kyeremeh

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirical studies on public-private partnerships (PPPs) and solid waste management (SWM) in Ghana and India to synthesize the “crucial…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirical studies on public-private partnerships (PPPs) and solid waste management (SWM) in Ghana and India to synthesize the “crucial lessons” for urban managers and policy makers in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of empirical studies was carried out, the search process comprised four categories of keywords combined differently across three main search engines in order to obtain a pool of more relevant literature on the study. Sorting for relevance was done at various levels; retrospective content analysis of relevant empirical studies on PPP and SWM in Ghana and India was subsequently carried out to draw lessons and policy suggestions.

Findings

PPPs have mainly been impressive in coverage of waste collection in the Ghanaian context, whilst in India, emphasis has been on injection of technology and effectiveness into SWM. It is also observed that in both cases the PPP processes have lacked adequate openness, transparency and sufficient stakeholder engagement. In the Ghana cases, mostly, urban authorities hardly pay attention to details in the partnership deed and also ignore monitoring of private partners. Poorly performed PPPs do occur when one of the partners relent on his role which could have a cascading effect on other actors.

Practical implications

Whilst PPP is a strong candidate to address the SWM challenges of urban centers in developing countries, this does not necessarily come about by joining the bandwagon. Merely entering into a partnership deed with private waste management companies without paying due attention to details of the contract will usher urban managers into a state of schizophrenia. The paper presents five key lessons to inform policy and practice.

Originality/value

The paper draws lessons from multiple cases of PPPs in Ghana and India by synchronizing lessons adaptable to city authorities and policy makers in developing countries.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Joseph Ato Forson, Rosemary Afrakomah Opoku, Michael Owusu Appiah, Evans Kyeremeh, Ibrahim Anyass Ahmed, Ronald Addo-Quaye, Zhen Peng, Ernest Yeboah Acheampong, Bernard Bekuni Boawei Bingab, Emmanuel Bosomtwe and Akorkor Kehinde Awoonor

The significant impact of innovation in stimulating economic growth cannot be overemphasized, more importantly from policy perspective. For this reason, the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

The significant impact of innovation in stimulating economic growth cannot be overemphasized, more importantly from policy perspective. For this reason, the relationship between innovation and economic growth in developing economies such as the ones in Africa has remained topical. Yet, innovation as a concept is multi-dimensional and cannot be measured by just one single variable. With hindsight of the traditional measures of innovation in literature, we augment it with the number of scientific journals published in the region to enrich this discourse.

Design/methodology/approach

We focus on an approach that explores innovation policy qualitatively from various policy documents of selected countries in the region from three policy perspectives (i.e. institutional framework, financing and diffusion and interaction). We further investigate whether innovation as perceived differently is important for economic growth in 25 economies in sub-Saharan Africa over the period 1990–2016. Instrumental variable estimation of a threshold regression is used to capture the contributions of innovation as a multi-dimensional concept on economic growth, while dealing with endogeneity between the regressors and error term.

Findings

The results from both traditional panel regressions and IV panel threshold regressions show a positive relationship between innovation and economic growth, although the impact seems negligible. Institutional quality dampens innovation among low-regime economies, and the relation is persistent regardless of when the focus is on aggregate or decomposed institutional factors. The impact of innovation on economic growth in most regressions is robust to different dimensions of innovation. Yet, the coefficients of the innovation variables in the two regimes are quite dissimilar. While most countries in the region have offered financial support in the form of budgetary allocations to strengthen institutions, barriers to the design and implementation of innovation policies may be responsible for the sluggish contribution of innovation to the growth pattern of the region.

Originality/value

Segregating economies of Africa into two distinct regimes based on a threshold of investment in education as a share of GDP in order to understand the relationship between innovation and economic growth is quite novel. This lends credence to the fact that innovation as a multifaceted concept does not take place by chance – it is carefully planned. We have enriched the discourse of innovation and thus helped in deepening understanding on this contentious subject.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Nicholas Oppong Mensah, Ernest Christlieb Amrago, Emmanuel T.D. Mensah, Jeffery Kofi Asare and Samuel Afotey Anang

Aquaculture insurance has the potential of redressing climate-change because it serves as an alternative source of finance in the event of unforeseen circumstances. To this end…

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Abstract

Purpose

Aquaculture insurance has the potential of redressing climate-change because it serves as an alternative source of finance in the event of unforeseen circumstances. To this end, the authors examine the prospects, determinants and profitability of aquaculture insurance among fish farmers in the Eastern region of Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 140 fish farmers were sampled for the study. Thematic analysis was used to determine perceived aquaculture insurance prospects. The Heckman's two-stage model, profitability index (PI) and return on investment (ROI) was employed to respectively determine the factors influencing aquaculture insurance participation and amount intensity and the profitability of aquaculture.

Findings

The thematic analysis revealed three themes on the perception of aquaculture insurance prospects: loss recovery, farm renovation and promotes agriculture. Different sets of demographic and institutional factors have varying influences on aquaculture insurance participation and amount intensity. Profitability index (PI) and return on investment (ROI) were respectively 2.07 and 3.2%.

Originality/value

The research provides relevant information on perceived aquaculture insurance prospects, aquaculture insurance participation, and amount intensity and profitability of aquaculture which can contribute to enhancing aquaculture insurance and the aquaculture industry in Ghana.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Gazi Mahabubul Alam and Md. Abdur Rahman Forhad

Diploma Engineers (DE) mainly receive practical and skills-oriented education and training in the area of technical and vocational subjects from the polytechnic system. Globally…

Abstract

Purpose

Diploma Engineers (DE) mainly receive practical and skills-oriented education and training in the area of technical and vocational subjects from the polytechnic system. Globally, universities have limited DEs access to Higher Education (HE). Over the course of time, many countries have changed this situation, putting into place a decent qualification and policy framework that ensures higher education for deserving candidates. Lately, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) received special priority in developing countries, and Bangladesh is no exception to it, resulting in a massive growth of DE. This study, the first of its kind, examines the impact of this growth with a key focus on the inclusion of diploma engineers into higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the differentiated nature of research questions, multiple techniques are used to collect the data. However, this research uses the qualitative method. Both secondary and primary data are used. While secondary data are collected by the Bangladesh Bureau of Educational Information and Statistics (BANBEIS), primary data are collected through interviews. With standard sets of admission questions, tests are conducted with two groups of students to draw a comparison.

Findings

The number of students studying at polytechnic institutes is increasing dramatically. The growth of public polytechnic institutes remains steady. Public counterparts respond to the demand by operating both day and night shifts. Many private polytechnics are also established. The size and infrastructure of private Polytechnics are relatively insignificant. However, the mushrooming private sector covers the increased demand. The curve of DE has been increased radically with a questionable competency by the contribution of both public and private polytechnics. Only one public university provides higher education to these DE.

Originality/value

A few reports have been published in the area of TVET by the development partners and the Government of Bangladesh. Only one journal article is published exploring the role of TVET on national development in Bangladesh. However, none cover the issue of access to university education for DE graduates.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Kwadwo Opoku and Emmanuel Adu Boahen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of school attendance on learning and child labour in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of school attendance on learning and child labour in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a nationally representative sample of household and individual data in 2005/06 and 2011/12 for the analysis. Regression discontinuity, the capitation grant in 2005 as exogenous, is used to estimate the impact of school attendance on child labour and learning outcomes.

Findings

The study found that children who were exposed to the capitation grant spent more hours in school and were more likely to enrol in primary school. School attendance was found to increase the likelihood to read and write a standardised test in English. Also, the improvement in children’s school attendance was found to enhance the likelihood of performing a written calculation. The authors could not find any evidence that school attendance affected child labour.

Originality/value

This research is the first causality analysis in sub-Saharan Africa that uses a nationally representative dataset to study the impact of school attendance on child labour and learning outcomes using a regression discontinuity estimator to deal with endogeneity issues.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2023

Abstract

Details

Visual and Multimodal Urban Sociology, Part B
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-633-7

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Nicholas Oppong Mensah, Jeffery Kofi Asare, Ernest Christlieb Amrago, Samuel Afotey Anang and Tekuni Nakuja

This paper seeks to examine the prospects and constraints of implementing food banking in the in Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the prospects and constraints of implementing food banking in the in Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Multistage sampling technique was used to select 385 respondents for the study. Descriptive statistics were used to present prospects of food banking. The probit regression model was used to analyse factors influencing food banking implementation whereas Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used to analyse constraints in implementing food banking.

Findings

Addressing food poverty, helping to provide food aid to respondents in times of pandemics (such as Covid 19) and also helping in reducing food wastage were the most notable prospects of food banking. Age, household size, food bank awareness and food poverty had a significant positive influence on food banking implementation, whereas residential status and employment status had a significant negative influence on food banking implementation. The most pressing constraint in implementing food banking is funding and support with the mean rank of 3.03 whiles the least pressing constraint is improper documentation of potential beneficiaries with the mean rank of 6.72.

Social implications

This study provides empirical contributions and practical implications for implementing food banks in Ghana. Thus, the government of Ghana through the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) can enact policies that can help prevent food losses and wastage. In this vain, food which could have been wasted would be redirected to food banks. This can serve as a tool for social intervention, poverty alleviation and prevention of hunger among the vulnerable in Ghana.

Originality/value

Despite several studies on food banking in affluent countries, food banking research in developing countries such as Ghana remains scanty. Thus, this paper makes significant contributions to the literature on prospects and constraints in implementing food banking and the factors influencing food banking implementation.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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