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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Michael A. West, Joanne Lyubovnikova, Regina Eckert and Jean-Louis Denis

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges that health care organizations face in nurturing and sustaining cultures that ensure the delivery of continually…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges that health care organizations face in nurturing and sustaining cultures that ensure the delivery of continually improving, high quality and compassionate care for patients and other service users.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an extensive review of the literature, the authors examine the current and very challenging context of health care and highlight the core cultural elements needed to enable health care organizations to respond effectively to the challenges identified.

Findings

The role of leadership is found to be critical for nurturing high-quality care cultures. In particular, the authors focus on the construct of collective leadership and examine how this type of leadership style ensures that all staff take responsibility for ensuring high-quality care for patients.

Practical implications

Climates for quality and safety can be accomplished by the development of strategies that ensure leaders, leadership skills and leadership cultures are appropriate to meet the challenges health care organizations face in delivering continually improving, high quality, safe and compassionate patient care.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive integration of research findings on how to foster quality and safety climates in healthcare organizations, synthesizing insights from academic literature, practitioner reports and policy documents to propose clear, timely and much needed practical guidelines for healthcare organizations both nationally and internationally.

Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Catherine C. Quatman-Yates, Mark V. Paterno, Mariann L. Strenk, Michelle A. Kiger, Tory H. Hogan, Brian Cunningham and Rebecca Reder

The importance of culture is often emphasized for continuous learning and quality improvement within health care organizations. Limited empirical evidence for cultivating…

Abstract

The importance of culture is often emphasized for continuous learning and quality improvement within health care organizations. Limited empirical evidence for cultivating a culture that supports continuous learning and quality improvement in health care settings is currently available.

The purpose of this report is to characterize the evolution of a large division of physical therapists and occupational therapists in a pediatric hospital setting from 2005 to 2018 to identify key facilitators and barriers for cultivating a culture empowered to engage in continuous learning and improvement.

An ethnographic methodology was used including participant observation, document review, and stakeholder interviews to acquire a deep understanding and develop a theoretical model to depict insights gained from the investigation.

A variety of individual, social, and structural enablers and motivators emerged as key influences toward a culture empowered to support continuous learning and improvement. Features of the system that helped create sustainable, positive momentum (e.g., systems thinking, leaders with grit, and mindful design) and factors that hindered momentum (e.g., system uncertainty, staff turnover, slow barrier resolution, and competing priorities) were also identified.

Individual-level, social-level, and structural-level elements all influenced the culture that emerged over a 12-year period. Several cultural catalysts and deterrents emerged as factors that supported and hindered progress and sustainability of the emergent culture.

Cultivating a culture of continuous learning and improvement is possible. Purposeful consideration of the proposed model and identified factors from this report may yield important insights to advance understanding of how to cultivate a culture that facilitates continuous learning and improvement within a health care setting.

Details

Structural Approaches to Address Issues in Patient Safety
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-085-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Kirsti Kasila and Marita Poskiparta

At the moment, Finnish oral health care is undergoing many changes. Little attention has been paid to issues of organisational culture and communication in Finnish oral…

2112

Abstract

At the moment, Finnish oral health care is undergoing many changes. Little attention has been paid to issues of organisational culture and communication in Finnish oral health care. Yet the question of culture is of primary importance for changes in an organisation and for planning and reconstructing the rational functioning of an organisation. The purpose of this paper is to examine Finnish public oral health care within a theoretical framework of organisational culture and to identify the various cultural traits that appear to characterise Finnish oral health care. Using a cultural point of view, we develop an orientation for understanding more profoundly and specifically the processes concerning the functioning and change of oral health care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Jacqueline McIntosh, Bruno Marques and Rosemary Mwipiko

Research has shown that Indigenous people suffer significant health inequalities in comparison to dominant colonising cultures. Evidence shows that these inequalities can…

Abstract

Research has shown that Indigenous people suffer significant health inequalities in comparison to dominant colonising cultures. Evidence shows that these inequalities can be addressed by gaining a deeper understanding of the social and cultural determinants of health, applying Indigenous views of health and developing better definitions of the term wellbeing. The following chapter draws on research exploring the relationship between Indigenous culture, the landscape and the connection with health and wellbeing. In Aotearoa/New Zealand, consideration of Indigenous Māori is a national imperative, enshrined in the Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) which establishes it as a bicultural country. Exploring three Māori health models, the chapter examines the factors that play a significant role in shaping Māori people's health. It relates how landscape is a foundational therapeutic aspect of Māori wellbeing using the models to express the forces that impact both positively and negatively on this relationship. The chapter concludes that all three concepts, culture, health and landscape, are interconnected and must be balanced to reduce Māori health inequalities and to provide a more sustainable model for health and wellbeing for all New Zealanders.

Details

Clan and Tribal Perspectives on Social, Economic and Environmental Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-366-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Riya Elizabeth George, Nisha Dogra and Bill Fulford

The purpose of this paper is to review the challenges of teaching values and ethics in mental-health, explore the differing perspectives of the key stakeholders and…

5714

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the challenges of teaching values and ethics in mental-health, explore the differing perspectives of the key stakeholders and stimulate further questions for debate in this area; leading to a proposal of an alternative approach to educating mental-health professionals on values and ethics.

Originality/value

In current mental-health care settings, very few professionals work with homogeneous populations. It is imperative that mental-health education and training ensures health professionals are competent to practice in diverse settings; where ethics and values are bound to differ. Establishing professional practice not only involves considering concepts such as values and ethics, but also equality, diversity and culture. Incorporating values-based practice and cultural diversity training holds promise to education and training, that is truly reflective of the complexity of clinical decision making in mental-health. Further research is needed as to how these two frameworks can be unified and taught.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Juan Aguirre

– The purpose of this paper is to identify the effect of culture, gender and perceived health benefits on coffee drinking in Costa Rica.

1822

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the effect of culture, gender and perceived health benefits on coffee drinking in Costa Rica.

Design/methodology/approach

A telephone survey (n=1,328) was conducted in the province of San Jose, where the capital city is located. This location has a population of 845,000, with a 99 per cent, confidence, 1 per cent error and 50 per cent response distribution, the total usable surveys were 1,199. The analytical procedure, consisted of three steps; instrument validation, consumer profile development and developing ordinal logistic modelling.

Findings

The total α was estimated at 0.71. The coffee consumer profile is described but consisted of 52 per cent female and 48 per cent male with 77 per cent receiving a secondary education. The factors influencing coffee drinking by Costa Ricans, are in order of importance: first gender followed by family as a source of information, health, amount spent, aroma, anti-migraine effect, family tradition, flavour and energizing effect. H1health, culture and gender influence the frequency of coffee consumption in Costa Rica is accepted; H2 – the importance of the health factor varies with gender is accepted and H3culture is an important factor in determining coffee consumption is also accepted.

Research limitations/implications

The study was only conducted in the province of San Jose. This is considered the urban heart of the country urban but its finding should not be extrapolated to the entire country. A rural/urban comparison may be needed.

Practical implications

The results suggest that a country wide survey may be useful in providing information for differential coffee marketing strategies.

Originality/value

The material is the first of its kind in the Central American region and may help orient other countries of the area.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Mark O'Neill

The research on the health benefits of intensive engagement with creative and cultural activities through art therapy and workshops led by artists is well recognised in…

Abstract

The research on the health benefits of intensive engagement with creative and cultural activities through art therapy and workshops led by artists is well recognised in the literature on cultural impact. In general, this engagement involves small numbers and, in the current climate, is unlikely to receive sufficient investment to make a difference at a population level. Less recognised is an emerging field of epidemiological research on the health impact of ‘general cultural attendance’. This provides evidence that simply going to a museum, art gallery, film or concert on a regular basis increases longevity, and that culture is a separate variable. This article summarises this evidence and looks at the strategic implications for cultural organisations from the perspective of a practitioner. If cultural attendance can help address health inequalities, and if the best way to overcome the psychological and social barriers to cultural attendance is personal contact with a trusted guide, the article outlines a system where voluntary and statutory organisations can refer people to cultural organisations who might benefit from them. The former would need to be able to guarantee a high quality and friendly welcome that recognises the needs of first‐time users from excluded groups. Developed among a network of cultural organisations with voluntary and public sector partners, such a system could reach sufficient numbers to have a health impact on a population level.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2011

Daisy Bogg

The emphasis on outcomes rather than process is an area that is receiving significant attention across the delivery of public sector services, and the question ‘so what?…

Abstract

The emphasis on outcomes rather than process is an area that is receiving significant attention across the delivery of public sector services, and the question ‘so what?’ is increasingly being asked of service providers. With service user self‐direction being the focus of both provision and commissioning over the coming years, there will be an increasing need to justify the delivery and development of social care in terms of the end result. Strong leadership and vision is required across the public sector if this change, in both organisational culture and service user expectation, is to be achieved.Leadership as both a competency and an organisational function has been well researched within health and social care. The literature largely points towards the need for clarity and strength within the strategic vision, especially when considering the management of change and multifaceted partnerships, both of which are crucial to the delivery of social care outcomes. The actual detail of the outcome framework, and the means by which it can be measured and quantified, is still an area of debate, and as such the aim here is to highlight some of the benefits and barriers that may be faced as the reform of the social care system evolves, with a specific focus on the impact that leadership can have on the delivery of an outcome‐focused mental health social care serviceThe analysis of outcome‐focused organisations is a relatively new concept in health and social care, and as such this paper seeks to debate the evidence in terms of whether leadership contributes to better service user outcomes in mental health social care. Dynamics within organisations, professions and with service users are all key considerations in the achievement of positive outcomes, and the role of the leader is to empower the staff group to power share and move towards co‐production in order to embed choice, control and service user contribution in the overall philosophy and culture of mental health service provision and developments.The overall conclusions of this paper are that leadership is important in terms of shaping services, ensuring governance and promoting innovation, and as a result it is possible to suggest that leadership and positive outcomes do have a direct correlation.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Marie Carney

The purpose of this paper is to identify if aspects of organizational culture may indicate a new terrain in the cultural influences‐quality healthcare relationship. This…

7800

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify if aspects of organizational culture may indicate a new terrain in the cultural influences‐quality healthcare relationship. This research stems from the author's belief that viewing the role of head of department or directorate as pivotal to health care management is critical to health care planning and quality healthcare delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were undertaken among 50 professional clinician and non‐clinician managers working in the role of head of department, in acute care hospitals in Ireland. The sample was drawn from the total population of 850 managers, utilized in a previous survey study.

Findings

Organizational culture is more complex than was previously thought. Several cultural influences such as excellence in care delivery, ethical values, involvement, professionalism, value‐for‐money, cost of care, commitment to quality and strategic thinking were found to be key cultural determinants in quality care delivery.

Research limitations/implications

Health care managers perceive that in order to deliver quality focused care they need to act in a professional, committed manner and to place excellence at the forefront of care delivery, whilst at the same time being capable of managing the tensions that exist between cost effectiveness and quality of care. These tensions require further research in order to determine if quality of care is affected in a negative manner by those tensions.

Originality/value

Originality relates to the new cultural terrain presented in this paper that recognizes the potential of health service managers to influence the organizations' culture and through this influence to take a greater part in ensuring that quality health care is delivered to their patients. It also seems to be important that value‐for‐money is viewed as an ethical means of delivering healthcare, and not as a conflict between quality and cost.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Samia Jamshed and Nauman Majeed

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between team culture and team performance through the mediating role of knowledge sharing and team emotional…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between team culture and team performance through the mediating role of knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The study advocated that team culture influences the knowledge sharing behavior of team members and the development of emotional intelligence skill at the team level. Further, it is hypothesized that knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence positively influence team performance. By adopting a quantitative research design, data were gathered by using a survey questionnaire from 535 respondents representing 95 teams working in private health-care institutions.

Findings

The findings significantly indicated that knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence influence team working. Furthermore, this study confirms the strong association between team culture and team performance through the lens of knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence.

Practical implications

This investigation offers observational proof to health-care services to familiarize workers with the ability of emotional intelligence and urge them to share knowledge for enhanced team performance. The study provides in-depth understanding to managers and leaders in health-care institutions to decentralize culture at the team level for endorsement of knowledge sharing behavior.

Originality/value

This is amongst one of the initial studies investigating team members making a pool of knowledge to realize potential gains enormously and influenced by the emotional intelligence. Team culture set a platform to share knowledge which is considered one of the principal execution conduct essential for accomplishing and managing team adequacy in a sensitive health-care environment.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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