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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Susan Cartwright, Simon L. Albrecht and Elisabeth Wilson-Evered

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534

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Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2011

Jason A. Wolf, Heather Hanson and Mark J. Moir

Health care organizations provide a unique and insightful microcosm of the many larger challenges health care systems face around the world. To improve our health care…

Abstract

Health care organizations provide a unique and insightful microcosm of the many larger challenges health care systems face around the world. To improve our health care industry, one has to first improve the internal health and well-being of the organizations that deliver care every day. In other words, to become a high-functioning industry, the organization has to become healthy first (Lovey, Nadkarni, & Erdelyi, 2007). This book has been crafted to catalyze this journey of creating healthy and vibrant health care organizations through proven strategies and evidence-based practices and in doing so have some part in transforming our global health care industry.

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Organization Development in Healthcare: Conversations on Research and Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-709-4

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Ivan Robertson, Mark P. Healey, Gerard P. Hodgkinson, Jill Flint-Taylor and Fiona Jones

The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships between leader personality traits (neuroticism and conscientiousness) and four specific workplace stressors (control;…

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1357

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships between leader personality traits (neuroticism and conscientiousness) and four specific workplace stressors (control; work overload; work-life balance and managerial relationships) experienced by work group members.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors accessed personality data from N=84 leaders and surveyed members of their respective work groups (N=928) to measure established workplace stressors. Multi-level modelling analyses were conducted to explore relationships between leader neuroticism and conscientiousness and work group members’ perceptions of sources of pressure.

Findings

The results relate to the general problem of how, and to what extent leaders have an impact on the well-being of members of their workgroups. Although previous research has generally associated conscientiousness with effective leadership, the results suggest that some facets of conscientiousness may be less useful for leadership effectiveness than others. In particular, the results show that leaders’ levels of achievement striving are linked to poor work life balance scores for their workgroups. The results also show that leader neuroticism is not related to work group members’ perceptions of sources of pressure.

Practical implications

The findings showed that leader personality influences three out of the four employee stressors hypothesized. The idea that the influence of leader personality may be relatively indirect via employee working conditions is potentially important and suggests implications for practice. To the extent that the negative effects of leader personality are mediated via working conditions, it may be feasible to counter, or at least assuage such effects by implementing appropriate regulations or working practices that mitigate leaders’ ability to influence the specific conditions in question.

Originality/value

Most studies have focused on how employee well-being outcomes are influenced through the direct impacts of leadership styles and behaviours, or contagious emotions. The authors explore an alternative and untested proposition that the leaders’ personality influences the working conditions that are afforded to subordinates. No empirical research to date have examined the relationships between leader personality and workplace stressors. The research also demonstrates the importance of using facet-level personality measures, compared with measures at the broad domain level.

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Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Elaine Farndale and Jaap Paauwe

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness that despite many calls for attention to a firm’s context in considering consequences for human resource management (HRM…

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1013

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness that despite many calls for attention to a firm’s context in considering consequences for human resource management (HRM) and performance, research progress to date has been limited at best, although promising signs of change are emerging. Moreover, what has been defined as “performance” is coming under increasing scrutiny, with a more holistic concept emerging that balances both a firm’s financial performance and employee well-being. The question remains whether this is a mutual gains or conflicting outcomes situation for the firm vis-á-vis the employee.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a framework that facilitates a broader context-centric analysis of the HRM and performance relationship. In so doing, the authors posit that context should no longer merely be an obligatory control variable in a research design, but instead should be explicitly incorporated in both theory development and empirical model testing.

Findings

The Contextual SHRM Framework demonstrates how key organizational actors can balance competitive, heritage and institutional mechanisms to create an appropriate strategic HRM (SHRM) system capable of delivering organizational outcomes that balance financial and employee well-being outcomes, which in the long run impact societal well-being that, in turn, recreates the firm’s operating context. At the heart of the framework is an iterative process between context and the SHRM system, achieving an appropriate level of dynamic fit across the various components.

Practical implications

In addition to empirical research, the framework has to date been widely used in executive development training, serving as a force field analysis tool allowing simultaneous consideration of the external and internal elements of a firm’s context, key organizational actors and SHRM system outcomes. HR professionals applying the framework to their organization can add value by demonstrating the clear linkage between the business strategy, the HRM system and the firm’s operating context.

Originality/value

This paper is designed to encourage new directions in future research and practice. The Contextual SHRM Framework is presented as a novel tool to facilitate advancement of the HRM and performance field of study.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Andrew Smith and Michael Pitt

The paper aims to identify and demonstrate the benefits of plants in offices in contributing to employee health and well‐being by applying the study to a working office.

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2780

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify and demonstrate the benefits of plants in offices in contributing to employee health and well‐being by applying the study to a working office.

Design/methodology/approach

Via comprehensive literature reviews, the paper identifies the importance of indoor plants in office environments, firstly through physically improving the air quality and removing pollutants and secondly in improving employee well‐being through psychological benefits.

Findings

It is argued that plants are important in removing indoor air pollutants and in increasing employee perceptions of well‐being. The paper identifies, through literature review, plants with the ability to remove common office pollutants. It shows that there is a general preference for plants in offices through a perception survey and that occupants of planted offices feel more comfortable, more productive, healthier and more creative and feel less pressure than occupants of non‐planted offices.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical research presented was limited to one office building. Research is now continuing, with the survey currently being completed by occupants of various offices throughout the UK.

Practical implications

The paper argues that indoor plants should become an integral part of corporate real estate strategies and that they have potential to alleviate sick building syndrome symptoms.

Originality/value

This paper provides an insight into how plants can be incorporated within corporate real estate strategies to improve employee health and well‐being and improve perceived productivity. It brings together two separate strands of research into the benefits in physically improving air quality and the psychological benefits of plants to humans.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Ole Henning Sørensen

The purpose of this paper is to document and discuss the effects of a participatory intervention in preschools focussing upon improving the performance of the primary task…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document and discuss the effects of a participatory intervention in preschools focussing upon improving the performance of the primary task on employee health and organizational effectiveness. Further, to investigate the role of implementation intensity on the outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal, participatory intervention study of 62 preschools involving approximately 1,800 employees. The evaluation uses short-term sickness absence to measure employee health, employee-assessed primary-task quality and parent-assessed user satisfaction to measure organizational effectiveness, and implementation intensity was measured as hours per employee and as per the request by the workplace managers, and compensation was offered by the project.

Findings

The multi-level analyses show that preschools with higher implementation intensity have stronger effects on employee health and organizational effectiveness than preschools with lower implementation intensity. The differences indicate that the main intervention component, improving performance of the central work tasks through collaborative, participatory workplace activities, had effects on both health and effectiveness and that workplace and employee engagement in the intervention is crucial to its success.

Practical implications

Inspired by the Tavistock tradition for socio-technical systems design, the study indicates an avenue for conducting collaborative organizational change processes that benefit both employees and organizations. In addition, it proposes “hours used per employee” as a relatively simple measure of implementation intensity in such interventions.

Originality/value

The study contributes to research in the field of occupational psychological health by reporting on a comprehensive participatory intervention study comprising measures of employee health, organizational performance and implementation intensity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Michael A. West, Joanne Lyubovnikova, Regina Eckert and Jean-Louis Denis

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges that health care organizations face in nurturing and sustaining cultures that ensure the delivery of continually…

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2950

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges that health care organizations face in nurturing and sustaining cultures that ensure the delivery of continually improving, high quality and compassionate care for patients and other service users.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an extensive review of the literature, the authors examine the current and very challenging context of health care and highlight the core cultural elements needed to enable health care organizations to respond effectively to the challenges identified.

Findings

The role of leadership is found to be critical for nurturing high-quality care cultures. In particular, the authors focus on the construct of collective leadership and examine how this type of leadership style ensures that all staff take responsibility for ensuring high-quality care for patients.

Practical implications

Climates for quality and safety can be accomplished by the development of strategies that ensure leaders, leadership skills and leadership cultures are appropriate to meet the challenges health care organizations face in delivering continually improving, high quality, safe and compassionate patient care.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive integration of research findings on how to foster quality and safety climates in healthcare organizations, synthesizing insights from academic literature, practitioner reports and policy documents to propose clear, timely and much needed practical guidelines for healthcare organizations both nationally and internationally.

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Aristides I Ferreira, Luis F. Martinez, Cary Cooper and Diana M. Gui

Some underlying mechanisms regarding presenteeism still remain unclear, namely, the construct of “presenteeism climate” and the importance of “leadership” Leader-Member…

Abstract

Purpose

Some underlying mechanisms regarding presenteeism still remain unclear, namely, the construct of “presenteeism climate” and the importance of “leadership” Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) for presenteeism. In order to shed some light into this phenomenon, the purpose of this paper is to develop and apply a new scale of presenteeism climate.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, the authors identified a pool of items from the literature and, in Study 2 (n=147) the authors tested 26 items that were pilot studied with exploratory factor analysis. In Study 3 (n=293) the authors tested a three-factor model – extra-time valuation, supervision distrust and co-workers competitiveness – with confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

Results showed that LMX has a negative correlation with presenteeism climate. Study 3 also showed that this structure remained invariant with additional samples from employees working in hospitals from Ecuador (n=90) and China (n=237). Finally, the authors included suggestions for future studies to overcome the limitations of this research.

Practical implications

This study has implications for managers and academics, as it emphasizes the importance of favorable behaviors between leaders and employees in order to decrease presenteeism and its adverse consequences.

Originality/value

The main contribution consists of identifying dimensions of presenteeism climate and developing measures. Additionally, the authors contribute to the literature on leadership by studying the influence of LMX on presenteeism climate.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Paul Sparrow and Cary Cooper

As founding editors of the Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, this paper welcomes the beginnings of a new academic community. The purpose of…

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5436

Abstract

Purpose

As founding editors of the Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, this paper welcomes the beginnings of a new academic community. The purpose of this paper is to outline why both academic researchers and organizational practitioners need to enter into and be guided by a new debate and new set of expertise. It signals the sorts of research agendas that need to be addressed in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper establishes the future research agenda for organizational effectiveness. It reviews historic literature and traces the development of the field of organizational effectiveness from: early analysis of political judgements about effectiveness; systemic analysis of the intersection of profitability, employee satisfaction and societal value; debates over stakeholder, power, social justice and organizational fitness, resilience and evolution; the importance of mental models of senior managers; how organizations use changes in work system design and business process to modify employee's mental, emotional and attitudinal states; and the use of an architectural metaphor to highlight the locus of value creation perspectives.

Findings

There are many echoes of the debates and concerns today in the past. The paper shows how current concerns over strategic and business model change, organization design, talent management, agile and resilient organization, balanced scorecard, employee engagement, advocacy and reputation can be informed, and better contextualized, by drawing upon frameworks that have previously arisen.

Research limitations/implications

The paper argues that the authors must adopt a broad definition of performance, and examine how the achievement of important strategic outcomes, such as innovation, customer centricity, operational excellence, globalization, become dependent on people and organization issues. It signals the need to focus on the intermediate performance outcomes that are necessary to achieve these strategic outcomes, and to examine these performance issues across several levels of analysis such as the individual, team, function, organization and societal (policy) level.

Practical implications

The audience for this paper and the journal as a whole is academics who work on cross-disciplinary research problems, the leading human resource (HR), strategy or performance research centres, and finally senior managers and specialists (not just HR) from the internal centres of expertise inside organizations who wish to keep abreast of leading thinking.

Originality/value

The paper argues the need to combine human resource management perspectives with those from decision sciences, supply chain management, operations management, consumer behaviour, innovation, management cognition, strategic management and its attention to the resource-based view of the firm, dynamic capabilities, business models and strategy as practice. It argues for a broadening of analysis beyond human capital into related interests in social capital, intellectual capital and political/reputational capital, and for linkage of the analysis across time, to place the novelties and contexts of today into the structures of the past.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2021

Amlan Haque

The unprecedented crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic has posed an enormous challenge ever for health-care organisations to find strategies to deal with their survival. The…

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2064

Abstract

Purpose

The unprecedented crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic has posed an enormous challenge ever for health-care organisations to find strategies to deal with their survival. The health-care employees are the frontline soldiers to fight against COVID-19 pandemic. Currently, there is a lack of research regarding the conceptualisation of COVID-19 and its impact on health-care employees’ well-being and their organisational sustainability. Extending the role of responsible leadership (RL), the purpose of this paper is to develop a multi-level conceptual model to overcome the crisis of COVID-19 pandemic and promote employee (e.g. workers, nurses and professionals) well-being and organisational sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

With a comprehensive literature review, this paper presents five testable propositions and highlights the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on employee well-being and organisational sustainability.

Findings

The proposed model counsels that organisations need to go beyond the simple application of strategic climate and should enable RL to protect and maintain employee well-being and organisational sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed conceptual model is a step forward to not only explore future empirical research but also it will help the health-care policymakers to take responsible initiatives to increase employee well-being and uphold organisational sustainability.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research regarding the conceptualisation of the COVID 19 pandemic and its impact on health-care employees’ well-being and organisational sustainability. The proposed conceptual model opens and guides a novel research avenue for the alignment of strategic management (as a moderator) and RL on the relationships among the COVID-19 pandemic, employee well-being and organisational sustainability.

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