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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

John Sinclair and David Collins

Discusses the major difficulties facing human resource developmentin organizations with respect to the role of training and developmentpersonnel who are seen to have been…

Abstract

Discusses the major difficulties facing human resource development in organizations with respect to the role of training and development personnel who are seen to have been forced into a reactive position by senior management dictates. Gives an overview of the failure to deliver appropriate training and development and the lack of real commitment to HRD. Puts forward the need for a new kind of training and development professional and the key issues that need to be addressed.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

R.K. Auluck

This paper seeks to study the changing role of training and development over a seven‐year period.

3265

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to study the changing role of training and development over a seven‐year period.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative analysis; comparative analysis of 763 training and development/HRD job advertisements featured over a seven month‐period in 1996‐1997 and in 2003‐2004.

Findings

Change in the training and development role has been patchy and not as extensive as some of the literature has suggested.

Research limitations/implications

The study was confined to training and development/HRD job advertisements from one, albeit leading, UK HR magazine and only allowed a seven‐year gap between the two sets of data gathered. It would have been interesting to have analysed job advertisements from multiple sources and over a longer period of time, and to have had a ten‐year gap between the two sets of data. However, the data gathering was a very time‐consuming process which limited the scope of the data gathered.

Practical implications

Practitioners need to consider how the training and development/HRD role is represented to the external world and the implications this has for the perceived image of the profession. Further, given the amount of resources invested in the recruitment process, those compiling job advertisements need to take care to ensure that the final product accurately reflects what is required of the post and incorporates any changes to the role over time.

Originality/value

First study to use training and development/HRD job advertisements to examine the ways in which the role of training and development has changed.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1990

Garrett J. Endres and Brian H. Kleiner

Successfully measuring effectiveness in management training anddevelopment can be a difficult task. Design of a valid measurementprogramme should include evaluation in key…

4126

Abstract

Successfully measuring effectiveness in management training and development can be a difficult task. Design of a valid measurement programme should include evaluation in key areas; including emotional reaction and knowledge gain measured after training interventions. Behavioural change and organisational impact measurements should be used on a longer time horizon to evaluate the progress and currency of the management development programme. Finally, research shows that maintaining a balance of the above measurements is the final key to success in measuring the effectiveness of management training and development.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1980

JAG Jones

The Industrial Training Service was established in 1960 to influence ideas about training at national level and to help put them into practice. This has always been the…

Abstract

The Industrial Training Service was established in 1960 to influence ideas about training at national level and to help put them into practice. This has always been the background against which ITS in‐company work or individual training and development programmes have been conducted. The Industrial Training Service thus has been one of the links between the realities of day‐to‐day work carried out in organisations, and the thinking at national level, which guides the policies and practices of training and human resource development. This article describes how the development of the ITS over the past 20 years has paralleled the evolution of training in the UK. It describes a working model which has guided its development and uses it to make some analysis and prediction for the next 20 years.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Thomas N. Garavan

Reports empirical evidence on stakeholders′ perceptions vis‐à‐vis the HRD function. Examines both internal andexternal HRD stakeholder groups and identifies their…

3224

Abstract

Reports empirical evidence on stakeholders′ perceptions vis‐à‐vis the HRD function. Examines both internal and external HRD stakeholder groups and identifies their expectations, values, beliefs and evaluation criteria as they relate to the HRD function within the organization.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1987

Thomas N. Garavan

The idea that learning is a natural human activity which takes place in a relatively non‐contrived way as part of everyday life has, in the author's experience, been lost…

Abstract

The idea that learning is a natural human activity which takes place in a relatively non‐contrived way as part of everyday life has, in the author's experience, been lost when one considers the present state of training and development in many modern organisations. While it is accepted that some contrivance of the learning activity is necessary in order to make it more effective, there has been something of an obsession amongst trainers and consultants to come up with new methods and approaches, rather than concentrating on helping people to learn. Furthermore, the training function has tended not to emphasise the important role that the line manager plays in the development activity within the modern organisation. This may have arisen because the training function wanted to demonstrate ownership and establish a power base within the organisation; however, centralised ownership of training and development does not lend itself to the promotion and undertaking of non‐contrived on‐the‐job/natural development activities.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Nicola Mindell

Reports that most organizations see training and development as theprovince of the human resource department. Proposes that responsibilityfor this should be placed in the…

5860

Abstract

Reports that most organizations see training and development as the province of the human resource department. Proposes that responsibility for this should be placed in the hands of the line manager. Investigates how the responsibility for training and development can be successfully transferred to the line manager. Concludes with a series of key learning points which help in the implementation of this strategy.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Robert S. Bussom, Hussein Elsaid, John R. Schermerhorn and Harold K. Wilson

Most organised development efforts in developing countries have historically focused on health care, food sufficiency, infrastructure, or technical and vocational training

Abstract

Most organised development efforts in developing countries have historically focused on health care, food sufficiency, infrastructure, or technical and vocational training. However, the need to enhance concurrently managerial and organisational capabilities has been increasingly recognised. This is currently being addressed in many developing countries through formal management development projects sponsored both locally and by such external agencies as the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the World Bank, among others. As interest grows in effectively accomplishing planned management development in such settings, and as the magnitude of resource commitments to development projects increases from local and international sources, there is a corresponding need for guidelines on how to do these development activities well in the settings of third world countries. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a comprehensive design for management and organisation development that incorporates learning from the author's experiences with a three‐year middle management training project conducted in Egypt.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Andrew Smith

The purpose of this paper is to examine the statistical evidence for the extent of employer training in Australia and analyse this information in the light of three major…

5280

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the statistical evidence for the extent of employer training in Australia and analyse this information in the light of three major qualitative projects that have been undertaken into employer training since the mid‐1990s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports an analysis of the major statistical databases on employer training in Australia and also draws evidence from three major projects that used a case study method in their qualitative phases.

Findings

The paper finds that assumptions about low levels of employer training expenditure in Australia are not supported by the available statistical data. The three qualitative projects examined also support the conclusion that Australian enterprises are increasing both the quality and quality of the training they provide to their employees.

Research limitations/implications

The research projects reported in this paper were completed during the period 1994‐2004.

Practical implications

The paper concludes that the research evidence supports an increasing quality and quantity of training in Australian enterprises. In recent years this increase in training activity has been partly driven by government policies aimed at making nationally recognised training more available to employers and employees.

Originality/value

The paper counters the prevailing assumptions about the quality and quality of training provided by Australian employers and shows that carefully framed government policy can have a major effect on the level of employer investment in training.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2022

Mensah Prince Osiesi, Victor Tobiloba Odobe, Kamorudeen Taiwo Sanni, Adijat Bolanle Adams, Chigozie Celestina Oke, Udukhomose Suleiman Omokhabi and Nnaemeka Chijioke Okorie

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of professional training and development for librarians/library staff in the southwest, Nigeria; especially the Federal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of professional training and development for librarians/library staff in the southwest, Nigeria; especially the Federal University of OyeEkiti, Nigeria. Thus, this study intends to assess the impact of staff professional development and training on the job performance of library staff in the Federal University Oye Ekiti, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive survey research design was used in carrying out this study. The population of study cuts across all library staff/attendants in the Federal University Oye Ekiti departmental, faculty and the university libraries. The purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the sample for the study (77 library staff). Research instruments, developed by the researchers, Staff Development Programme Questionnaire (r = 0.79), Staff performance Questionnaire (r = 0.81), Challenges of Staff Professional Development and Training Questionnaire (r = 0.82), were used for data collection. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics (frequency counts and percentages, mean and standard deviation) and inference statistics (correlation and one-way ANOVA) at a 5% level of significance.

Findings

Results revealed that the level of the job performance of library staff in Federal University Oye-Ekiti (FUOYE) is high; there is a positive and statistically significant relationship between the professional development of library staff and their performance in the job; professional development and training of library staff significantly impact their job performance; orientation, in-house training, seminars, on-the-job training and instructor-led training.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to the university libraries in the Federal University Oye Ekiti, Nigeria. The variables used in this study were restricted to training and development of library staff and job performance of librarians in FUOYE, and professional development programmes available for FUOYE librarians.

Practical implications

Other forms of professional development programmes such as Distance Educational Programmes, Conferences/Workshops, Study visits, Formal professional library education and TETFUND Programmes should be made available for university library staff. Universities should always organise staff professional development programmes; since it enhances the job performance of library staff.

Originality/value

This article is original and has not been published elsewhere.

Details

Library Management, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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