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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2021

David O. Danesh and Thomas P. Huber

The purpose of the paper is to describe the current state of leadership and leader–member exchange (LMX) theory in dentistry and develop a novel conceptual model of LMX to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe the current state of leadership and leader–member exchange (LMX) theory in dentistry and develop a novel conceptual model of LMX to guide future research and highlight the importance of enhancing leadership training for new dentists.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review exploring leadership in dentistry and LMX in dentistry was completed. The findings were analyzed with framework analysis to develop a novel conceptual model of LMX specific to dentistry.

Findings

LMX theory was applied to leadership in dentistry, including a focus on new dentists, senior dentists, other dental team members and the patient. A new conceptual model of the New Dentist LMX Quartet, which is unique and specific to new dentist teams, was developed.

Research limitations/implications

The study identifies the need for research in LMX in dentistry, contributes a new conceptual model for LMX theory and identifies future research.

Practical implications

Practitioners, policymakers and educators can utilize this information to explore concepts in leadership and improve training and dental practice.

Originality/value

No other studies specifically exploring LMX in dentistry for new dentists exist. The current literature review and conceptual paper begins the conversation on developing understanding of leadership in dentistry through further research.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Stephen George Willcocks

The purpose of this paper is to explore selective leadership approaches in the context of dentistry in the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore selective leadership approaches in the context of dentistry in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper utilising published sources from relevant literature about leadership theory and practice and the policy background to dentistry in the UK.

Findings

This paper suggests that there is merit in identifying and applying an eclectic mix of leadership theory to the case of dentistry. It offers insight into individual aspects of the leadership role for dentists and applies this to the dental context. It also contrasts these individual approaches with shared leadership and suggests this may also be relevant to dentistry. It highlights the fact that leadership will be of growing concern for dentistry in the light of recent policy changes.

Research limitations/implications

This paper points out that there are developmental implications depending on the particular approach taken. It argues that leadership development will become increasingly important in dentistry in the UK.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a topic that has so far received limited attention in the literature.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Tamson Pietsch

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the history of war, the universities and the professions. It examines the case of dentistry in New South Wales, detailing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the history of war, the universities and the professions. It examines the case of dentistry in New South Wales, detailing its divided pre-war politics, the role of the university, the formation and work of the Dental Corps during the First World War, and the process of professionalization in the 1920s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on documentary and archival sources including those of the University of Sydney, contemporary newspapers, annual reports and publication of various dental associations, and on secondary sources.

Findings

The paper argues that both the war and the university were central to the professionalization of dentistry in New South Wales. The war transformed the expertise of dentists, shifted their social status and cemented their relationship with the university.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine dentistry in the context of the histories of war, universities and professionalization. It highlights the need to re-evaluate the changing place of the professions in interwar Australia in the light both of the First World War and of the university’s involvement in it.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Abbas Azari and Sakineh Nikzad

The goal of rapid mechanical prototyping is to be able to quickly fabricate complex‐shaped, 3D parts directly from computer‐aided design models. The key idea of this novel…

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Abstract

Purpose

The goal of rapid mechanical prototyping is to be able to quickly fabricate complex‐shaped, 3D parts directly from computer‐aided design models. The key idea of this novel technology is based upon decomposition of 3D computer models data into thin cross‐sectional layers, followed by physically forming the layers and stacking them up; “layer by layer technique.” This new method of modeling has raised many attentions in dentistry especially in the field of surgery and implantology. The purpose of this review study is to represent the historical development and various methods currently used for building dental appliances. It is also aimed to show the many benefits which can be achieved by using this new technology in various branches of dentistry.

Design/methodology/approach

The major existing resources, including unpublished data on the internet, were considered.

Findings

Although, creating 3D objects in a layered fashion is an idea almost as old as human civilization but, this technology has only recently been employed to build 3D complex models in dentistry. It seems that in near future many other methods will develop which could change traditional dental practices. It is advisable to include more unit hours in dental curriculums to acquaint dental students with the many benefits of this novel technology.

Originality/value

It is hard to believe that the routine dental techniques were affected by revolutionary concepts originally theorized by engineering methods. It is a reality that in future, most of the restorative disciplines will be fully revised and the computer methods be evolved to an extent where dentistry can be performed by computer‐assisted methods with optimum safety, simplicity, and reliability.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Derek Richards

Dentistry like medicine is beginning to come to terms with the pressures and challenges of providing health care now and in the future. The need for more effective…

Abstract

Dentistry like medicine is beginning to come to terms with the pressures and challenges of providing health care now and in the future. The need for more effective interventions in Dentistry are being increasingly appreciated. The aims and role of the Oxford based Centre for Evidence‐Based Dentistry in helping to achieve this are outlined.

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Ajay Noronha, Shreeranga Bhat, E.V. Gijo, Jiju Antony and Suma Bhat

The article evaluates the obstacles, lessons learned and managerial implications of deploying Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in a dental college hospital in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The article evaluates the obstacles, lessons learned and managerial implications of deploying Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in a dental college hospital in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The work adopts the action research (AR) methodology to establish a case study, which is carried out using the LSS define–measure–analyze–improve–control (DAMIC) approach in a dental college. It uses LSS tools to enhance the productivity and performance of the Conservative Dentistry Department of a dental college and to unravel the obstacles and success factors in applying it to the education and healthcare sector together.

Findings

The root cause for high turn-around time (TAT) is ascertained using LSS tools and techniques. The effective deployment of the solutions to the root causes of variation assists the dental college to reduce the TAT of the Conservative Dentistry process from an average of 63.9 min–36.5 min (i.e. 42.9% improvement), and the process Standard Deviation (SD) was reduced from 2.63 to 2 min. This, in turn, raises the sigma level from 0.48 to 3.23, a noteworthy successful story for this dental college.

Research limitations/implications

While the results and recommendations of this research are focused on a single case study, it is to be noted that the case study is carried out with new users of LSS tools and techniques, especially with the assistance of interns. This indicates the applicability of LSS in dental colleges; thus, the adopted modality can be further refined to fit India's education and hospital sector together.

Originality/value

This article explains the implementation of LSS from an aspiring user viewpoint to assist dental colleges and policymakers in improving competitiveness. In addition, the medical education sector can introduce an LSS course in the existing programme to leverage the potential of this methodology to bring synergy and collaborative research between data-based thinking and the medical field based on the findings of this study. The most important contribution of this article is the illustration of the design of experiments (DOE) in the dental college process.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Nora Hiivala, Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa and Heikki Murtomaa

The purpose of this paper is to: determine the prevalence and distribution of patient/family-generated, dentistry-related complaints to Regional State Administrative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: determine the prevalence and distribution of patient/family-generated, dentistry-related complaints to Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVIs) and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) in Finland from 2000 to 2011, study patient/family safety incident experiences and other reasons for complaints, assess complaint validity and evaluate factors associated with disciplinary processes against dentists.

Design/methodology/approach

Data included closed cases handled by AVIs and Valvira (2000-2011) against dental practitioners or dental practice units (n=782). The authors analysed the complaints distribution and examined the antecedent factors and circumstances.

Findings

This study demonstrated that patients/families can detect many dental treatment hazards, substandard processes and even serious safety risks rather well. The investigation processes revealed some physical harm or potential patient safety (PS) risks in more than half the alleged cases. Many complaints accumulated against certain individuals and statistically significant positive correlations were found between some patient/family complaints, dentist-specific variables and disciplinary actions.

Practical implications

Patient/family-generated complaints must be taken seriously and seen as relatively good safety risk indicators. However, more knowledge on how patients might cooperate with dental care providers to prevent errors is needed.

Originality/value

This work provides a unique opportunity to learn from several dentistry-related patient complaints. Despite some limitations, patient complaints appear to be useful as a complementary source together with other PS study methods.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Alessandra Mazzei, Vincenzo Russo and Alberto Crescentini

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the most relevant quality factors and communication activities that are suitable as competitive levers in dentistry.

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2189

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the most relevant quality factors and communication activities that are suitable as competitive levers in dentistry.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a model that highlights the reciprocal influence between patient satisfaction and dentist reputation. The model points out that experience/behaviours, explicit communication and word‐of‐mouth are antecedents of both patient satisfaction and dentist reputation. This research is based on interviews with senior dentists, focus groups with patients and a survey of dentistry patients.

Findings

The most important quality factors for patient satisfaction are the doctor‐patient relationship and the clarity of information about treatment and cost. Key communication levers are first, the implicit communication that arises from successful treatment and overall service quality; second, the explicit communication that arises from interpersonal relations with the dentist and the staff, and the referrals of previous patients.

Practical implications

In order to gain competitive advantages, dentists should achieve an average level of patient satisfaction for “given” and “secondary” factors; to pay careful attention to “strategic factors”; and to explicitly communicate “opportunity factors” since patients are usually unaware of their value. Furthermore, dentists should emphasize interpersonal, experiential and third‐party communication with patients.

Originality/value

The paper puts forward a model that integrates previous service quality and reputation management models, and makes suggestions for the improvement of service quality management and communication in dentistry.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Susan Patterson and Pauline Ford

The purpose of this paper is to inform education of non-mental health professionals who provide care to people with severe mental illness; to describe dentistry students…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inform education of non-mental health professionals who provide care to people with severe mental illness; to describe dentistry students’ knowledge and views about mental illness, including willingness to engage in various social situations with a person hospitalised for mental illness; and to assess and understand the impact of a targeted lecture on views and attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed mixed methods to examine dental students’ knowledge and views about mental disorder before and after a seminar covering mental disorder, disadvantage and oral health. Findings from a bespoke questionnaire administered to third-year dental students were triangulated with qualitative data gathered in interviews with a subsample.

Findings

Students understood mental disorder broadly, employing diverse causal models. Although knowledge was typically grounded in media stereotypes, attitudes were benevolent and most students reported willingness to provide dental care to affected individuals. The seminar, especially the consumer delivered section, was valued and associated with increased appreciation of the impact of mental disorder on oral health and need for assertive action to promote access to care. However, students reported being reluctant to disclose their own mental health problems for fear of being considered a professional or personal failure. A minority knew how to seek support if a friend talked of suicide.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the need for further investigation of the knowledge and attitudes of dentistry students pertinent to provision of care to people with mental illness and to examine the links between attitudes and practice. The paper also provides a useful foundation for development of brief educational interventions, particularly the value in integrating the service user perspective, and their evaluation. Research should also examine the impact of mental health education on practice.

Practical implications

A single inexpensive educational session, such as the one the paper developed may support reconsideration of often unconscious views of mental illness which might affect practice.

Social implications

If people with mental illness are to receive equitable access to health care, non-mental health professionals should be supported to develop knowledge and attitudes which are conducive to inclusive treatment. An education session such as this could be helpful.

Originality/value

There is scant literature examining attitudes of dentistry students and no reports of mental health-specific education with this population.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Michele Germani, Roberto Raffaeli and Alida Mazzoli

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a method for comparing the scanning and reproducing accuracy of highly shaped objects like plaster casts used in dentistry.

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1029

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a method for comparing the scanning and reproducing accuracy of highly shaped objects like plaster casts used in dentistry.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical considerations on errors introduced by the scanning systems and subsequent point clouds data elaboration have led to a method to estimate the accuracy of the whole process. Suitable indices have been chosen and computed at each stage. As a final result, the overall chain, scanning and reproducing systems can be assessed. In order to validate the proposed method casts have been scanned by means of commercial systems and then reproduced by using different rapid prototyping technologies, materials and parameters. Error indices have been computed and reported.

Findings

Since it is not possible to define reliable and meaningful reference models for non‐standard shapes, an absolute accuracy value for the scanning process cannot be stated. Anyway the proposed method, thanks to relative performance indices, allows the comparison of different acquisition systems and the evaluation of the most performing manufacturing chain.

Practical implications

The study provides a method to assess the relative performance between commercial systems both in scanning and reproducing stage.

Originality/value

In literature, some studies on the accuracy of scanning devices have been found but they are based on standard geometrical features. In this paper, the problem of complex shapes in absence of reference model is addressed instead.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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