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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2010

Amer Al‐Roubaie

The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of Indigenous Knowledge (IK) in development. The paper focuses on the role that IK and local cultural values play in…

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of Indigenous Knowledge (IK) in development. The paper focuses on the role that IK and local cultural values play in the process of development. Currently, knowledge, information, science and technology used in development are produced in developed countries without heed being paid to their impact on the local environment. IK, although often short‐shirted, establishes a harmonious relationship between the social system and the environment in any given developing countries. Access to global knowledge is vital for supporting IK as well as for sustaining development.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Allam Ahmed and Amer Al‐Roubaie

The purpose of this paper is to assess and evaluate the role of information and communication technologies as a proposed solution to reduce poverty in the Arab countries

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess and evaluate the role of information and communication technologies as a proposed solution to reduce poverty in the Arab countries and therefore achieve sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

In this article, the authors have taken a somewhat extensive review of the different aspects of ICTs in DCs with particular focus on Arab countries. Given the current poor conditions and isolation of Arab countries from the rest of the world, a number of fundamental research questions are addressed.

Findings

Empowering nations with ICTs could increase productivity, promote human development, create knowledge, disseminate information and reduce poverty.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of building ICTs capacity for both promoting human development and enhancing capabilities of people to participate in the economy.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Radwa Ahmed Abdelghaffar, Hebatalla Atef Emam and Nagwa Abdallah Samak

The purpose of this study is to investigate the nexus between financial inclusion and human development for countries belonging to different income groups during…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the nexus between financial inclusion and human development for countries belonging to different income groups during 2009–2019, and whether this relation differs across these groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper constructs an index of financial inclusion (IFI) for different income group countries employing dynamic panel data models estimated by generalized method of moments (GMM) to analyse the relation between financial inclusion and human development.

Findings

Financial inclusion in low and lower-middle-income countries has higher effect on human development than in high and upper-middle income countries.

Research limitations/implications

The study examines the effect of IFI on the human development index (HDI) at the aggregate level. Future research can tackle the IFI effect on every component of HDI and other aspects of financial inclusion could be incorporated like financial technology.

Originality/value

The originality lies in constructing an index for financial inclusion using the most recent data for a wide range of countries, in addition to examining the impact of financial inclusion on the human development levels of different income groups allowing for more accurate analysis tackling the differences in terms of adopted policies across various income groups; unlike other studies that are carried out on a one country basis or only across one or two country groups that do not allow for comparison across various groups of countries.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Nina Bohdan and Veronika Garkavaya

This chapter discusses the positioning of Belarus in the international context of socioeconomic development based on an assessment of the country's dynamics in world…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the positioning of Belarus in the international context of socioeconomic development based on an assessment of the country's dynamics in world rankings. The country's presence in the recognized world rankings and its holding high positions in them is an obvious advantage for achieving a favorable investment image. Ratings characterize the country's comparative position at the international level in a number of areas: from credit capacity to human capital development.

There has been analyzed the position of the Republic of Belarus in several recognized international comparisons, such as Human Development Index, Doing Business, ICT Development Index, Global Innovation Index, Sustainable Development Goals Index, Corruption Perceptions Index, Rule of Law Index, Worldwide Governance Indicators, and others.

However, Belarus is not yet participating in the international competitiveness assessment through such popular international ratings as Global Competitiveness Index and Global Entrepreneurship Monitor. The research findings show that the strongest aspects of the socioeconomic development of Belarus are in place due to the high educational level of the human capital development, gender equality, and the implementation of the UN sustainable development goals. The analysis also shows that the weaknesses of institutional environment and public administration do not enable the full implementation of the planned goals of socioeconomic development.

Details

Modeling Economic Growth in Contemporary Belarus
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-695-7

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Cintya Lanchimba, Hugo Porras, Yasmin Salazar and Josef Windsperger

Although previous research has examined the role of franchising for the economic development of countries, no empirical study to date has investigated the importance of…

1357

Abstract

Purpose

Although previous research has examined the role of franchising for the economic development of countries, no empirical study to date has investigated the importance of franchising for social, infrastructural, and institutional development. The authors address this research gap by applying research results from the field of sustainable entrepreneurship and highlight that franchising has a positive impact on economic, social, institutional and infrastructural development.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a fixed-effects model on a panel dataset for 2006–2015 from 49 countries to test the hypothesis that franchising positively influences various dimensions of country development such as economic social institutional and infrastructural development.

Findings

The findings highlight that franchising has a positive impact on the economic, social, infrastructural, and institutional development of a country. Specifically, the results show that the earlier and the more franchising systems enter a country, the stronger the positive impact of franchising on the country's economic, social, institutional, and infrastructural development.

Research limitations/implications

This study has several limitations that provide directions for further research. First, the empirical investigation is limited by the characteristics of the data, which are composed of information from 49 countries (covering a period of 10 years). Because franchising is not recognized as a form of entrepreneurial governance in many emerging and developing countries, the available information is mainly provided by the franchise associations in the various countries. Hence, there is a need to collect additional data in each country and to include additional countries. Second, although the authors included developed and developing countries in the analysis, the authors could not differentiate between developed and developing countries when testing the hypotheses, because the database was not sufficiently complete. Third, future studies should analyze the causality issue between franchising and development more closely. The role of franchising in development may be changing depending on different unobserved country factors, economic sector characteristics, or development stages.

Practical implications

What are the practical implications of this study for the role of franchising in the development of emerging and developing economies? Because public policy in emerging and developing countries suffers from a lack of financial resources to improve the social, infrastructural and institutional environment, entrepreneurs, such as franchisors who expand into these countries, play an important role for these countries' development. In addition to their entrepreneurial role of exploring and exploiting profit opportunities, they are social, institutional, and political entrepreneurs who may positively influence country development (Schaltegger and Wagner, 2011; Shepard and Patzelt, 2011). Specifically, the findings highlight that countries with an older franchise sector (more years of franchise experience) may realize first-mover advantages and hence larger positive spillover effects on their economic, social, institutional and infrastructural development than countries with a younger franchise sector. Hence, governments of emerging and developing countries have the opportunity and responsibility to reduce potential market entry barriers and provide additional incentives for franchise systems in order to trigger these positive spillover effects. The authors expect that the spillover effects from the franchise sector on the economic, institutional, social and infrastructural development of a country are stronger in emerging and developing countries than in developed countries.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on the impact of franchising on the economic development of a country, such as its growth of gross domestic product (GDP), employment, business skills, innovation and technology transfer. This study extends the existing literature by going beyond the impact of franchising on economic development: the results show that franchising as an entrepreneurial activity offers opportunities for economic, social, institutional, and infrastructural development, all of which are particularly important for emerging and developing economies. The findings of this study contribute to the international franchise and development economics literature by offering a better understanding of the impact of franchising on country development.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Alcides Barrichello, Emerson Gomes dos Santos and Rogerio Scabim Morano

This study aims to identify the countries’ innovation factors that are determinant for them to achieve higher levels of development. In addition, the research identified…

1620

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the countries’ innovation factors that are determinant for them to achieve higher levels of development. In addition, the research identified which of these factors should be prioritized so the countries can move up in the rank of the most competitive.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the indicators of innovation and the stage of development of 137 countries proposed by the Global Competitiveness Report published by the World Economic Forum and techniques of multivariate data analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that all the factors tested are determinant to lead the countries throughout their stages of development. The research highlights that the factors “Quality of scientific research institutions” and “Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) patent applications” should be equally prioritized for the countriesdevelopment.

Practical implications

The results suggested that the factors Capacity for Innovation, Quality of Scientific Research Institutions, Company Spending on Research and Development (R&D), University–Industry Collaboration in R&D, Government Procurement of Advanced Technology Products, Availability of Scientists and Engineers and PCT Patent Applications are decisive for positioning countries in terms of their stage of development and should be part of their public policy and enterprises’ strategic planning.

Originality/value

The findings show that countries should prioritize the factors Quality of Scientific Research Institutions and PCT Patent Applications, as these factors, when acting together, predict the evolution to higher stages of development.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Ahmad Hidayat and Asra Virgianita

Innovation is a fundamental element for developing countriesdevelopment. For instance, the innovation process should be integral to a country’s development plan for it…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation is a fundamental element for developing countriesdevelopment. For instance, the innovation process should be integral to a country’s development plan for it to achieve high standard socio-economic development. For this reason, the global development agenda in the contemporary era underline innovation as a crucial issue to be addressed within development assistance programs. The Global North as traditional donors predominantly contend that innovation should be supported by high private sector development (PSD), and therefore, emphasizes this agenda to be delivered through their foreign aid schemes. However, this character differs considerably as compared to new emerging donors with insufficient PSD capacity, such as Indonesia. This paper aims to examine Indonesia’s technical assistance (TAC) to Timor-Leste and scrutinizes whether or not it supports the innovation development of the receiving country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative method by conducting a literature review, document tracing and depth interview with Indonesia’s South–South Cooperation National Coordinating Team.

Findings

Based on this study, it can be proven that Indonesia’s TAC has the ability to support innovation development in Timor-Leste as a least developed country. This is because Indonesia’s TAC is directed toward knowledge sharing and technology transfer that are needed by Timor-Leste. Other supporting conditions, such as similarity in the process of development, shared principles and solidarity ties among developing countries, have also created a more decent environment for aid delivery. Thus, aid initiatives among developing countries must remain to be supported as key to attain mutual progress and collective self-reliance.

Originality/value

This study shows that Indonesia as an emerging economic has the capability to support innovation development of other developing countries. It was a new area of study but has a lot of potential to be explored such as effectiveness and interests.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2020

Guus Hendriks

This paper aims to use the eclectic paradigm as a broad organizing framework to bring together two somewhat parallel international business (IB) literatures, one on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the eclectic paradigm as a broad organizing framework to bring together two somewhat parallel international business (IB) literatures, one on the development effects of multinational enterprise activity and the other on the internationalization of emerging market multinationals (EMNEs). The author does so to better understand how outward foreign investment shapes economic development in firms’ home countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Considering that the characteristics of foreign investment by EMNEs likely differ from that of their developed economy counterparts and that such characteristics may have unique development consequences, the author revisits one of IB’s overarching theories to rethink how ownership, location and internalization advantages take shape and stimulate diverse development outcomes.

Findings

My narrative review and conceptual analysis indicate that the eclectic paradigm is a valuable framework that can be used to shed light on underexplored phenomena and thereby inform important policy debates. The analysis suggests that unique characteristics of EMNE investment simultaneously have positive and negative development consequences in their home countries.

Practical implications

The author sets out a research agenda that revolves around six propositions that separately relate one of these three distinct characteristics of EMNE investment to two development outcomes, namely, spillovers and direct effects on home-country employment. My propositions suggest that important policy dilemmas potentially apply, in that each of the three characteristics positively affects one of the aspects of development, but negatively the other.

Originality/value

My research agenda presents international business scholars with new opportunities to build on a history of policymaking impact, now geared toward resolving society’s grand challenge of underdevelopment.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Md Akther Uddin, Md Hakim Ali and Mansur Masih

This paper aims to study institutions, human capital and economic growth in developing countries.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study institutions, human capital and economic growth in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies dynamic system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) and simultaneous quantile regression on a panel of 120 developing countries for the period of 1996-2014.

Findings

The findings show that human development and institutions do have a significant positive effect on economic growth. Interestingly, institutions and human development have a significant negative interactive effect on the economic growth of developing countries. This paper argues that incremental investment in human development would impact economic growth negatively in the presence of weak and dysfunctional institutions because additional stock tends to be employed in rent-seeking and socially unproductive activities.

Research limitations/implications

The policy makers should bear in mind the critical role played by the institutions and the initial stage of growth of a country in making their education and health policies more effective.

Originality/value

The most important novelty is the study of various transmission channels: political, economic and financial institutions through which human development affect economic growth in developing countries. This paper also studies the Islamic economic development concept and empirically investigates whether Muslim countries are different from their counterparts. Moreover, this study extends the existing empirical growth literature by simultaneously applying dynamic system GMM and quantile regression techniques.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 184000