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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2022

Carolina Londono-Escudero

This article aims to contribute to the literature linking the three pillars of sustainable development with the human development field. To do so, it analyzes how a group…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to contribute to the literature linking the three pillars of sustainable development with the human development field. To do so, it analyzes how a group of stakeholders that participate in collective action for nature governance in Segre–Rialb, Catalonia, build collective capabilities and reconcile a holistic sustainable development with human development and collective well-being. The analysis is performed using nature governance and the capability approach theories. In particular, the framework providing the lenses to examine the collective action for nature governance is based on Elinor Ostrom's Institutional and Analysis framework and the collective capabilities concept.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on documental analysis (legal document namely and online resources available in Catalonian website) and a few online interviews since all fieldwork was canceled due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Findings

The case study reveals that collective action for nature governance has a twofold function: it materializes holistic sustainability and produces capabilities, reconciling sustainable and human development. Therefore, the research proves that people who work together to govern nature can boost a holistic perspective of sustainability and reconcile sustainable and human development.

Originality/value

First, this work aims to reconcile sustainable and human development fields that have been usually separated in academia, contributing to the research body that has attempted to relate human development and sustainability. This analysis uses a holistic perspective of sustainability, including the social, economic and environmental aspects connecting them to human development; this was not deeply explored before. Finally, the rigorous documental analysis, namely legal texts that allow reaching conclusions, is relevant since all fieldworks were canceled in 2021.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2022

Sovik Mukherjee

The chapter points to the interactive nature of the different aspects of sustainability of development and investigates the interrelations among the various facets of…

Abstract

The chapter points to the interactive nature of the different aspects of sustainability of development and investigates the interrelations among the various facets of development or sustainability. It further makes deeper analysis of the dynamic relations among human development, the natural environment, and economic growth. Using simultaneous equation econometric models for 1990–2019 in a cross section of 110 countries, it observes that economic growth in terms of growth of per capita national income is important for both human development as well as for environmental conservation and protection. For environmental sustainability it is thus both growth policy and direct environmental policies relating to protecting human health and health of the ecosystem would be of prime importance.

Details

Globalization, Income Distribution and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-870-9

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2022

Safaa Shaaban

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of women as human capital on sustainable development in the Egyptian community factories. Presently, sustainability has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of women as human capital on sustainable development in the Egyptian community factories. Presently, sustainability has become one of the targets all over the world , especially the Egyptian strategy that focuses more on women’s empowerment as human capital. There is a positive trend among organizations, governments and communities to focus more on the lead of sustainability in all our daily activities and business activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to gather data from 100 engineers (50 women and 50 men) employees of Egyptian factories and industries located in Egypt. To analyze, the collected data, regression analysis and correlation coefficient were employed to examine the study objectives and questions. A statistical Package for Social Sciences has been used for data analysis.

Findings

Results reveal that there is a direct positive relationship between women as a capital and sustainable development with its four interrelated pillars (economic, social, environmental and education) in a positive and significant way and the three factors of Human Capital (leadership and motivation, qualifications and satisfaction and creativity).

Research limitations/implications

The findings only apply to the sample (engineering women, men) that has participated in the questionnaire in the Egyptian factories. More research would be recommended in terms of further research study, highlighting the role of women in other categories in the STEM field as they are the human capital crucial for sustainable development and highlighting its impact on the Egyptian sustainable strategy 2030.

Practical implications

Although the Egyptian strategy reinforces gender equality and gaining more roles for women in the Egyptian community, there is still absence of women in factories and science. Based on the findings, there are three concerns that must be addressed: First, opportunities need to be embedded in the factories for more women, especially in engineering categories. Second, authorities must encourage human capital development for women. Third, there is a strong need to create responsible leadership between all human capitals which are especially important in areas of industry.

Social implications

Egyptian factories need to support women’s enthusiasm for innovation, continuously advance science and engineering, foster a business environment that fosters the coexistence of science and technology, the economy and society, support enterprise transformation and optimize the industrial structure of Egyptian industry. Simultaneously, it should encourage and promote the transformation of female achievements and strengthen the role of women leadership enterprises in Egyptian society. In order to promote the ideas of women, more money must be spent on scientific research, human capital must be allocated more effectively and fresh momentum for sustainable economic growth must be generated. It must expand training investment, encourage high-quality human capital and remove the bottleneck.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in presenting women as human capital in Egyptian society and reflects its impact on sustainable development pillars. Although much literature and study is dealing with the two topics of human capital and sustainable development separately or with links to other topics, they have not been dealt with together and there is a scarcity in the literature related to these topics focusing on women separately.

Details

Management & Sustainability: An Arab Review, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2752-9819

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2014

Eduardo Fayos-Solà, Laura Fuentes Moraleda and Ana Isabel Muñoz Mazón

Previously disregarded factors are now included in development theory and practice. A narrow understanding of capital has had profound effects on development as well as on…

Abstract

Previously disregarded factors are now included in development theory and practice. A narrow understanding of capital has had profound effects on development as well as on tourism policy and governance. In this framework, purpose-designed tourism for development has been the exception. Contemporary ideas of other forms of capital playing a key role in a broader concept of development are examined, specifically the central function of human and social-institutional capital. Human capital is seen in the light of capabilities, attributes, and knowledge possessed by individuals. Social-institutional capital may empower individuals as it refers to the value of trust and cooperation deriving from formal and informal sets of behavioral rules. This chapter clarifies the foundations of tourism as an instrument for development if tourism policy and governance are designed and implemented within an adequate framework.

Details

Tourism as an Instrument for Development: A Theoretical and Practical Study
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-680-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Muhammad Ali, Syed Ali Ali Raza, Chin-Hong Puah and Shamim Samdani

This research aims to explain the effect of financial indicators and economic growth on human capital in low-income countries.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explain the effect of financial indicators and economic growth on human capital in low-income countries.

Design/methodology/approach

We gathered balanced panel data from 1980 to 2016 over a sample of 12 low-income countries categorized by World Development Indicators. The data stationary properties were analyzed by unit root test while the existence of a long-run relationship among the variables was confirmed by cointegration test. We performed Hausman test to differentiate between the fixed effect and random effect model. The sensitivity analysis confirmed the robustness of the results.

Findings

Our findings indicated that broad money supply and private sector credit has a positive and significant impact on human capital. Interestingly, bank credit showed a negative and significant effect on human capital. We also found a significant positive relationship between human capital and economic growth in the study sample.

Originality/value

This is a preliminary study using financial development and human capital in low-income countries with panel econometric techniques as an analysis tool. Overall, we suggest a policy to focus on the financial sector development and economic growth to produce sustainable human capital.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Tun Lin Moe

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between official development assistance (ODA) and human and educational development in countries in Southeast Asia.

2311

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between official development assistance (ODA) and human and educational development in countries in Southeast Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

In the study described here, empirical evidence was used to investigate the relationship between ODA provided between 1990 and 2004 and its impact on the human and educational development of countries in Southeast Asia.

Findings

A review of efforts made over the past 15 years in providing developmental aid reveals that there still remain gaps in the human development dimensions – income, education, and health – within and between countries. Second, real gross domestic product and foreign direct investment have significant associations with human and educational development, while, at the aggregate level, ODA has a significant positive association only with human development. Third, ODA that is targeted to support socio‐economic development has a significant relationship with human development. Fourth, ODA allocated to unspecified levels of education, or post‐secondary education, shows a significant association with human development, while ODA provided for basic education, secondary education and post‐secondary education has a significant relationship with educational development.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on countries that have a medium level of human development, namely Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, Philippines, Laos and Vietnam.

Practical implications

The findings and results are useful guidelines for major stakeholders, including donors and the governments of recipient countries, for designing aid systems and effectiveness.

Originality/value

This paper draws the attention of donors and the governments of recipients to the effectiveness of aid and its targets.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Sharmila Gamlath

– The research aims to include good governance as a facet in the measurement of human development.

Abstract

Purpose

The research aims to include good governance as a facet in the measurement of human development.

Design/methodology/approach

A modified Human Development Index (MHDI) was computed by including a governance dimension computed using the six governance indicators published by the World Bank. The rankings using the new index were obtained and compared to the rankings of the United Nations Development Programme's (UNDP's) HDI.

Findings

The rank correlation of the original and modified indices was very high, but there were many big rank changes for individual countries in each HDI group. These rank changes could be largely reconciled in the light of the rankings of these countries in the Corruption Perceptions Index and the Democracy Index.

Research limitations/implications

The research considers the measurement of human development at a point in time alone and incorporates 2010 governance indicators into the 2011 HDI, which could lead to a discrepancy in time periods considered. Furthermore, the governance indicators are measures of perceptions which can be subjective. The Practical implications paper does not delve into the country-specific factors that may have caused big rank changes.

Practical implications

The paper builds a case for incorporating, or at least providing the option of including a governance dimension in the HDI.

Originality/value

The paper is a novel attempt to incorporate good governance as a dimension in the HDI. It reasserts the need for policy-makers and governments to realize that peoples' capabilities cannot be realized in the absence of good governance, and that whilst improving other facets of human development, much attention needs to be paid towards establishing good governance.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Belay Seyoum

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of state fragility on select indicators of human development and identify aspects of state fragility that have the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of state fragility on select indicators of human development and identify aspects of state fragility that have the greatest impact on poverty reduction and sustainable development. The paper also explores the impact of social cohesion on human development as well as the mediating role of state legitimacy in mediating the relationship between social cohesion and human development.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on data from 180 countries and uses ordinary least squares regression and mediation analysis to explore the effects of social cohesion on human development.

Findings

The findings show a significant relationship between state fragility and human development. It suggests that policies and efforts aimed at enhancing social cohesion would have the most significant impact on human development. The findings also show that social cohesion not only has a direct effect on human development but it also has an indirect effect on human development through state legitimacy (mediator).

Practical implications

Even though state fragility has been largely associated with low income countries, different facets of fragility are manifested in various countries regardless of levels of economic development.

Originality/value

The study is timely in view of the evidence of increasing state fragility in many countries. Furthermore, this is the first scholarly work linking lack of social cohesion, state fragility and human development.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Abouzar Zangoueinezhad and Asghar Moshabaki

Human development is the most modern development approach. However, the proposed human development indexes for implementation of Islamic human resource management (HRM) do…

3257

Abstract

Purpose

Human development is the most modern development approach. However, the proposed human development indexes for implementation of Islamic human resource management (HRM) do not suffice to realize the Islamic developed society. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the economic‐managerial indexes of human development based on HRM from the viewpoint of Islam and The Quran.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies the hermeneutic method and considers the question: “what are the proper human resource (HR) economic‐managerial indexes from the viewpoint of Islam?”.

Findings

Referring to the Islamic development basics and goals, it analyzes economic interaction among Muslim activists in an objective situation of the human development from the viewpoint of Islam and finally, it proposes human development economic‐managerial indexes among other required indexes, through planning an acceptable economic quasi‐system.

Originality/value

In the Islamic approach, human development occurs when a person's capacities improve so that he/she becomes able to manage internal and external contradictions and conflicts; and steps forward in the route of the faith and the righteous deed and in the space of the widespread justice to reach the God proximity and to replace the natural life by the Hayat‐e‐Tayyebeh.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 38 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Madhu Sehrawat and A.K. Giri

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between financial development indicators and human development in India using annual data from 1980-2012.

1625

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between financial development indicators and human development in India using annual data from 1980-2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The Ng-Perron unit root test is used to check for the order of integration of the variables. The long run relationship and short run dynamics are examined by implementing the ARDL bounds testing approach to co-integration. Granger’s non-causality test and variance decomposition techniques are also used to examine the impact of financial development indicators on human development.

Findings

The results confirm a long run relationship among the variables. The results of granger non causality indicate that unidirectional causality runs from financial development indicators to human development index (HDI). The variance decomposition analysis shows that among all the financial indicators, broad money supply (M3) has the largest contribution to changes in human development in India.

Research limitations/implications

The present study recommends for appropriate reforms in financial market to attain sustainable human development in India. The findings will be useful for India’s policy makers, in order to maintain the parallel expansion of financial development and human development.

Originality/value

This paper is first of its kind to empirically examine the casual relationship between financial development indicators and human capital development proxied by HDI in India by using modern econometric techniques.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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