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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Md. Saiful Islam and Al Jamal Mustafa Shindaini

This study examines the impact of institutional quality (INQ) and human capital creation (HCC) on economic growth (EG) linkage in Bangladesh using an ARDL approach.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of institutional quality (INQ) and human capital creation (HCC) on economic growth (EG) linkage in Bangladesh using an ARDL approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses time-series annual data over the period 1990–2019. It formulates an INQ index based on international country risk guide (ICRG) data, employs public education outlay and expenditure on health data each as a portion of real gross domestic product (GDP) to measure HCC, while an increase in real GDP is used as a proxy for EG. It employs the ARDL technique and Toda–Yamamoto (T-Y) causality check to realize the study.

Findings

The ARDL analysis divulges that the variables have a long-run association; INQ affects long-run EG positively; expenditure on health stimulates EG rate in the long run, but does not impact the latter in the short-run; whilst government spending on education impacts long-term EG rate negatively but positively in the short-term. The T-Y causality test results reveal a feedback relationship between INQ and EG, and one-way causation from health expenditure to EG rate, and education outlay to EG rate and authenticate the ARDL estimation results.

Originality/value

The study is original. The novelty of the study is to employ an INQ index using the ICRG data on 12 different components which are converted into a single index through principal component analysis.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-12-2021-0732

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 49 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

Julia R. Norgaard and Alexander Chase Cartwright

These zones offer participants a wide variety of incentives and can be found in sizes ranging from a few square acres to entire large cities. The diversity among SEZs…

Abstract

Purpose

These zones offer participants a wide variety of incentives and can be found in sizes ranging from a few square acres to entire large cities. The diversity among SEZs presents an opportunity for new research.

Design/methodology/approach

Special economic zones (SEZs) have grown exponentially in popularity during the past few decades, in size and scope. They are often lauded as instruments central to enhancing economic growth in developing countries. However, the empirical evidence on the relationship between SEZs and growth is inconclusive.

Findings

The analysis concludes that corruption leads to the creation of smaller zones that are likely the products of rent-seeking.

Originality/value

The authors argue that SEZs can be effective vehicles for rent-seeking, especially geographically small zones and develop an empirical model to explore the relationship between zone size and the impetus for the zone creation, namely corruption. Specifically, the authors analyze whether these small zones are vehicles of economic growth or manifestations of country wide corruption.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Circular Economy in Developed and Developing Countries: Perspective, Methods and Examples
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-982-4

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Circular Economy in Developed and Developing Countries: Perspective, Methods and Examples
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-982-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Ezebuilo R. Ukwueze, Henry T. Asogwa, Oliver E. Ogbonna and Chisom Emecheta

Nigeria has been ravaged by terrorist activities which has made the country unsafe for Nigerians and foreign investors. The motivation of this study arises from the dearth…

Abstract

Nigeria has been ravaged by terrorist activities which has made the country unsafe for Nigerians and foreign investors. The motivation of this study arises from the dearth of research applying quantitative empirics to the determinants of terrorism in a specific country. To achieve this goal, vector autoregressive (VAR) model was applied using data from Global Terrorism Database (GTD), International Country Risk Guide (ICRG) data, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) data, and Transparency International. Stata 13 software was used for estimation. The results show that ethnic violence, absence of good governance, presence of corruption, and rises in military expenditure are part of the causes of terrorism in Nigeria. It is, therefore, recommended that internal security should be maintained to minimize the occurrence of ethnic violence and ethnoreligious biases (sentiments) in the discussion of issues concerning Nigeria. Also, politicians should stop the proliferation of arms, as this will cease the violent reactions before and after elections. Finding lasting solutions to corruption using constitutional means will improve the quality of governance, which will improve the welfare state of the people and reduce restiveness.

Details

The Impact of Global Terrorism on Economic and Political Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-919-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2022

Anastasia A. Sozinova, Elena N. Makarenko, Elena Y. Zolochevskaya and Evgeny N. Tishchenko

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to scientifically test the credibility (proof or refutation) of the existing argument for a technological leap in the COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to scientifically test the credibility (proof or refutation) of the existing argument for a technological leap in the COVID-19 pandemic and the post-pandemic period.

Design/Methodology/Approach: The conducted review of existing sources of research literature showed that they have formed an insufficient scientific background for a clear understanding of digital deprivation of services, social contradictions and conflict management as components of technological leap amid the COVID-19 pandemic and in the post-pandemic period. To fill the identified gap in the system of scientific knowledge, this work uses the method of comparative analysis of statistical data. Some countries of the world, the EU countries and the United States, which are characterized by the largest population and the largest contribution of investments to the digitalization of value chains and the development of innovations, were selected as objects for this study.

Findings: Research has shown that rapid digitalization is impacting all aspects of life, including not only how value is created and exchanged, but also how we interact, operate, purchase and receive services. In this process, data and its international flows are becoming increasingly important for development. The usual digital gap associated with connectivity, reflecting significant differences between and within countries in readiness to use the power of data, is exacerbated by what might be termed the data gap. Countries with limited opportunities to transform digital data into digital analytics and entrepreneurial opportunities, and to use them for economic and social development, are obviously at a disadvantage.

Originality/Value: Digital data have been proven to be one of the top strategic assets for creating both private and public value. Our ability to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, 2015) depends a lot on how these data are applied. The idea of sustainable development arose, as it is known, for overcoming significant fluctuations in the positive transformation of society, and for the alignment in the pace and results of the transition of various countries to the post-industrial scenario of progress. There are many obstacles on the path of sustainable development, which hinder the transition to this vector of transformation. First, the gap in economic and social development between the countries of the ‘golden billion’ and many other countries has not been reduced. Second, the digital gap continues to deepen. But a new and extremely threatening danger on the path to the transition to sustainable development has become the global crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic that emerged in early 2020 and is still ongoing.

Determining the right course for the future is a difficult task, but its solution cannot be postponed. Data are multidimensional, and their use has an impact not only on trade and economic development but also on human rights, peace and security. In addition, measures should be taken to reduce the risk of misuse and unauthorized use of digital data by states, non-states or the private sectors to avoid the possibility of global social conflict.

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2022

Irina M. Khil, Albina A. Chuprova, Gyulnaz E. Adygezalova and Arina S. Chueva

Purpose: The paper aims to explore gender conflict as a factor of global technological inequality from a modelling and conflict management perspective through an analysis…

Abstract

Purpose: The paper aims to explore gender conflict as a factor of global technological inequality from a modelling and conflict management perspective through an analysis of women’s participation in science.

Design/methodology/approach: A review of the existing research literature has shown that there is an insufficient scientific basis for identifying the extent of gender conflict as a factor of global technological inequality through an analysis of women’s participation in science. Statistical data analysis is used to fill the identified gap in the scientific knowledge system. The countries chosen for study are those with the largest gender gaps and technological inequalities in terms of women’s participation in science and knowledge-intensive industries as well as in R&D.

Findings: The chapter reviews the factors that make the case, from an academic perspective, for the technological inequalities and gender gaps in the world leading to global employment conflict. The field of education encompasses numerous interrelated aspects, ranging from the level of demand and supply of educational opportunities to the access and delivery of education. These aspects also relate to the quality of teaching and the learning process, the effectiveness of the education system, individual learning outcomes, and the impact of education on the development and well-being of the individual, the community and the country as a whole. Scientific researchers make an important contribution to improving the quality of the education system: scientific research produces new knowledge further implemented through the education system. Such knowledge can improve people’s lives. Research is often carried out in universities, but also in the commercial sector, particularly in high-tech companies (Research and Development).

Originality/value: Education has been proven to be one of the resources that provide people with equal opportunities in life. Integrating a gender perspective into education includes assessing and promoting gender equality in learning opportunities available to men and women throughout their lives, especially during compulsory education. The gender approach also includes assessing the fairness of the delivery of educational services (such as training, management and course content).

Abstract

Details

Circular Economy in Developed and Developing Countries: Perspective, Methods and Examples
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-982-4

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Circular Economy in Developed and Developing Countries: Perspective, Methods and Examples
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-982-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2022

Alexey V. Tolmachev, Olesya A. Meteleva, Evgeniy B. Luparev and Elena V. Epifanova

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to scientifically verify the credibility (prove or disprove) the existing argument for the global technological inequality within…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to scientifically verify the credibility (prove or disprove) the existing argument for the global technological inequality within the conflict of traditions and innovations, as well as from the perspective of social consequences of the innovative development of the economy and the basics of conflict management.

Design/methodology/approach: A review of existing sources of research literature has shown that they formed an insufficient scientific basis for determining the essence and scope of social consequences of the innovative development of the economy and the basics of conflict management in terms of global technological inequality. The method of comparative analysis of statistical data over time is used to fill the identified gap in the scientific knowledge system in this chapter. The top 10 countries of the world, which are characterized by the highest level of the innovative development of the economy, were chosen as the objects of study.

Findings: This chapter presents a review of facts determining that there are arguments for the conflict of traditions and innovations against the backdrop of global technological progress from a scientific perspective, a conflict that has social consequences for the innovative development of the economy and the basics of conflict management. Today, the protection and promotion of national interests are being increasingly determined by digitalization as the primary function of diplomatic services. For example, cybersecurity affects national security; web platforms support the economic well-being of citizens and companies; the Internet contributes to the development of healthcare, education and other essential social services, especially during the crisis caused by the COVID-19.

Originality/value: It is expected that wide introduction of high technologies in developed countries will reduce the competitive ability of currently less industrialized economies of Asia and Africa in terms of cost of labour, will increase the technological gap between them and developed countries that will diversify their economies and create more jobs. In the past, countries such as China, Mexico, Brazil and several Asian countries were climbing the income ladder, transferring labour force and capital from the relatively inefficient agricultural economy to the more efficient products and services. Today, there are fears that high technologies and Industry 4.0 will revolutionize these conventional development processes, making a thorny path even more thorny, and will lead to conflicts of traditions and innovations as a source of global technological inequality.

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