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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2021

Wuyi Ye, Yiqi Wang and Jinhai Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to compare the changes in the risk spillover effects between the copper spot and futures markets before and after the issuance of copper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the changes in the risk spillover effects between the copper spot and futures markets before and after the issuance of copper options, analyze the risk spillover effects between the three markets after the issuance of the options and can provide effective suggestions for regulators and investors who hedge risks.

Design/methodology/approach

The MV-CAViaR model is an extended form of the vector autoregressive model (VAR) to the quantile model, and it is also a special form of the MVMQ-CAViaR model. Based on the VAR quantile model, this model has undergone continuous promotion of the Conditional Autoregressive Value-at-Risk Model (CAViaR) and the Multi-quantile Conditional Autoregressive Value-at-Risk Model (MQ-CAViaR), and finally got the current form of the model.

Findings

The issuance of options has led to certain changes in the risk spillover effect between the copper spot and its derivative markets, and the risk aggregation effect in the futures market has always been significant. Therefore, when supervising the copper product market and investors using copper derivatives to avoid market risks, they need to pay attention to the impact of futures on the spot market, the impact of options on the futures market and the risk spillover effects of spot and futures on the options market.

Practical implications

The empirical results of this paper can be used to hedge market risk investment strategies, and the changes in market relationships also provide an effective basis for the supervision of the copper product market by the supervisory authority.

Originality/value

It is the first literature research to discuss the risk and the impact of spillover effects of copper options on China copper market and its derivative markets. The MV-CAViaR model can capture the mutual risk influence between markets by modeling multiple markets simultaneously.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Walid Mensi, Ramzi Nekhili, Xuan Vinh Vo and Sang Hoon Kang

This paper examines dynamic return spillovers and connectedness networks among international stock exchange markets. The authors account for asymmetry by distinguishing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines dynamic return spillovers and connectedness networks among international stock exchange markets. The authors account for asymmetry by distinguishing between positive and negative returns.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs the spillover index of Diebold and Yilmaz (2012) to measure the volatility spillover index for total, positive and negative volatility.

Findings

The results show time-varying and asymmetric volatility spillovers among the stock markets under investigation. During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, bad volatility spillovers are more pronounced and dominated over good volatility spillovers, indicating contagion effects.

Originality/value

The presence of confirmed COVID-19 cases positively (negatively) affects the good and bad spillovers under low and intermediate (upper) quantiles. Both types of spillovers at various quantiles agree also influenced by the number of COVID-19 deaths.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Shuzhen Zhu, Xiaofei Wu, Zhen He and Yining He

The purpose of this paper is to construct a frequency-domain framework to study the asymmetric spillover effects of international economic policy uncertainty on China’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a frequency-domain framework to study the asymmetric spillover effects of international economic policy uncertainty on China’s stock market industry indexes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows the time domain spillover model, asymmetric spillover model and frequency domain spillover model, which not only studies the degree of spillover in time domain but also studies the persistence of spillover effect in frequency domain.

Findings

It is found that China’s economic policy uncertainty plays a dominant role in the spillover effect on the stock market, while the global and US economic policy uncertainty is relatively weak. By decomposing realized volatility into quantified asymmetric risks of “good” volatility and “bad” volatility, it is concluded that economic policy uncertainty has a greater impact on stock downside risk than upside risk. For different time periods, the sensitivity of long-term and short-term spillover economic policy impact is different. Among them, asymmetric high-frequency spillover in the stock market is more easily observed, which provides certain reference significance for the stability of the financial market.

Originality/value

The originality aims at extending the traditional research paradigm of “time domain” to the research perspective of “frequency domain.” This study uses the more advanced models to analyze various factors from the static and dynamic levels, with a view to obtain reliable and robust research conclusions.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Zeyi Miao

Under the guidance of the concept of openness and development, the paper grasps the mechanism of technology spillover in developed countries and analyzes how to better…

Abstract

Purpose

Under the guidance of the concept of openness and development, the paper grasps the mechanism of technology spillover in developed countries and analyzes how to better absorb advanced manufacturing technology based on empirical analysis so as to point out the path for the transformation and development of China’s digital manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper constructs the panel data model and further analyzes the impact of international technology spillovers on the transformation and development of the digital manufacturing industry.

Findings

This paper measures the level of technology spillover in the Yangtze River Delta region and finds that foreign direct investment (FDI) technology spillover and import trade technology spillover among four provinces and cities show a growth trend from 2010 to 2017. But after 2017, there is a certain degree of decline.

Originality/value

With the advent of industry 4.0, the digital manufacturing industry of all countries in the world is developing with a new attitude, the global technology spillover methods are diverse and the spillover channels have changed greatly, which will affect the transformation and upgrading of China's digital manufacturing industry.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Onur Polat and Eylül Kabakçı Günay

The purpose of this study is to investigate volatility connectedness between major cryptocurrencies by the virtue of market capitalization. In this context, this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate volatility connectedness between major cryptocurrencies by the virtue of market capitalization. In this context, this paper implements the frequency connectedness approach of Barunik and Krehlik (2018) and to measure short-, medium- and long-term connectedness between realized volatilities of cryptocurrencies. Additionally, this paper analyzes network graphs of directional TO/FROM spillovers before and after the announcement of the COVID-19 pandemic by the World Health Organization.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, we examine the volatility connectedness among eight major cryptocurrencies by the virtue of market capitalization by using the frequency connectedness approach over the period July 26, 2017 and October 28, 2020. To this end, this paper computes short-, medium- and long-cycle overall spillover indexes on different frequency bands. All indexes properly capture well-known events such as the 2018 cryptocurrency market crash and COVID-19 pandemic and markedly surge around these incidents. Furthermore, owing to notably increased volatilities after the official announcement of the COVID-19 pandemic, this paper concentrates on network connectedness of volatility spillovers for two distinct periods, July 26, 2017–March 10, 2020 and March 11, 2020–October 28, 2020, respectively. In line with the related studies, major cryptocurrencies stand at the epicenter of the connectedness network and directional volatility spillovers dramatically intensify based on the network analysis.

Findings

Overall spillover indexes have fluctuated between 54% and 92% in May 2018 and April 2020. The indexes gradually escalated till November 9, 2018 and surpassed their average values (71.92%, 73.66% and 74.23%, respectively). Overall spillover indexes dramatically plummeted till January 2019 and reached their troughs (54.04%, 57.81% and 57.81%, respectively). Etherium catalyst the highest sum of volatility spillovers to other cryptocurrencies (94.2%) and is followed by Litecoin (79.8%) and Bitcoin (76.4%) before the COVID-19 announcement, whereas Litecoin becomes the largest transmitter of total volatility (89.5%) and followed by Bitcoin (89.3%) and Etherium (88.9%). Except for Etherium, the magnitudes of total volatility spillovers from each cryptocurrency notably increase after – COVID-19 announcement period. The medium-cycle network topology of pairwise spillovers indicates that the largest transmitter of total volatility spillover is Litecoin (89.5%) and followed by Bitcoin (89.3%) and Etherium (88.9%) before the COVID-19 announcement. Etherium keeps its leading role of transmitting the highest sum of volatility spillovers (89.4%), followed by Bitcoin (88.9%) and Litecoin (88.2%) after the COVID-19 announcement. The largest transmitter of total volatility spillovers is Etherium (95.7%), followed by Litecoin (81.2%) and Binance Coin (75.5%) for the long-cycle connectedness network in the before-COVID-19 announcement period. These nodes keep their leading roles in propagating volatility spillover in the latter period with the following sum of spillovers (Etherium-89.5%, Bitcoin-88.9% and Litecoin-88.1%, respectively).

Research limitations/implications

The study can be extended by including more cryptocurrencies and high-frequency data.

Originality/value

The study is original and contributes to the extant literature threefold. First, this paper identifies connectedness between major cryptocurrencies on different frequency bands by using a novel methodology. Second, this paper estimates volatility connectedness between major cryptocurrencies before and after the announcement of the COVID-19 pandemic and thereby to concentrate on its impact on the cryptocurrency market. Third, this paper plots network graphs of volatility connectedness and herewith picture the intensification of cryptocurrencies due to a major financial distress event.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2005

David B. Audretsch, Max Keilbach and Erik Lehmann

The prevailing theories of entrepreneurship have typically revolved around the ability of individuals to recognize opportunities and act on them by starting new ventures…

Abstract

The prevailing theories of entrepreneurship have typically revolved around the ability of individuals to recognize opportunities and act on them by starting new ventures. This has generated a literature asking why entrepreneurial behavior varies across individuals with different characteristics, while implicitly holding the external context in which the individual finds oneself to be constant. Thus, where the opportunities come from, or the source of entrepreneurial opportunities, are also implicitly taken as given. By contrast, we provide a theory identifying at least one source of entrepreneurial opportunity – new knowledge and ideas that are not fully commercialized by the organization actually investing in the creation of that knowledge. The knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship holds individual characteristics as given, but lets the context vary. In particular, high knowledge contexts are found to generate more entrepreneurial opportunities, where the entrepreneur serves as a conduit for knowledge spillovers. By contrast, impoverished knowledge contexts are found to generate fewer entrepreneurial opportunities. By serving as a conduit for knowledge spillovers, entrepreneurship is the missing link between investments in new knowledge and economic growth. Thus, the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship provides not just an explanation of why entrepreneurship has become more prevalent as the factor of knowledge has emerged as a crucial source for comparative advantage, but also why entrepreneurship plays a vital role in generating economic growth. Entrepreneurship is an important mechanism permeating the knowledge filter to facilitate the spillover of knowledge, and ultimately generating economic growth.

Details

University Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-359-4

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2018

Pym Manopimoke, Suthawan Prukumpai and Yuthana Sethapramote

This chapter examines dynamic connectedness among emerging Asian equity markets as well as explores their linkages vis-à-vis other major global markets. We find that…

Abstract

This chapter examines dynamic connectedness among emerging Asian equity markets as well as explores their linkages vis-à-vis other major global markets. We find that international equity markets are tightly integrated. Measuring connectedness based on a generalized Vector Autoregressive (VAR) model, more than half of all total forecast error variance in equity return and volatility shocks come from other markets as opposed to country own shocks. When examining the degree of connectedness over time, we find that international stock markets have become increasingly connected, with a gentle upward trend since the Asian financial crisis (AFC) but with a rapid burst during the global financial crisis (GFC). Despite the growing importance of Asian emerging markets in the world economy, we find that their influence on advanced economies are still relatively small, with no significant increase over time. During the past decade, advanced markets have been consistently net transmitters of shocks while emerging Asian markets act as net receivers. Based on the nature of equity shock spillovers, we also find that advanced countries are still tightly connected among themselves while intraregional connectedness within Asia remains strong. By investigating whether uncertainty plays an important role in explaining the degree of stock market connectedness, we find that economic policy uncertainty (EPU) from the US is an important source of financial shock spillover for the majority of international equity markets. In contrast, US financial market uncertainty as proxied by the VIX index drives equity market spillovers only among advanced economies.

Details

Banking and Finance Issues in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-453-4

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Constantin Gurdgiev and Barry Trueick

At the onset of the Global Financial Crisis in 2007–2008, majority of the analysts and policymakers have anticipated contagion from the markets volatility in the advanced…

Abstract

Purpose

At the onset of the Global Financial Crisis in 2007–2008, majority of the analysts and policymakers have anticipated contagion from the markets volatility in the advanced economies (AEs) to the emerging markets (EMs). This chapter examines the volatility spillovers from the AEs’ equity markets (Japan, the United States and Europe) to the four key EMs, the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China).

Methodology

The period under study, from 2000 through mid-2014, reflects a time of varying regimes in markets volatility, including the periods of dot.com bubble, the Global Financial Crisis and the European Sovereign Debt Crisis, the Great Recession and the start of the Russian-Ukrainian geopolitical crisis. To estimate volatility cross-linkages between the AEs and BRIC markets, we use multivariate GARCH-BEKK model across a number of specifications.

Findings

We find that, the developed economies weighted return volatility did have a significant impact on volatility across all four of the BRIC economies returns. However, contrary to the consensus view, there was no evidence of volatility spillover from the individual AEs onto BRIC economies with the exception of a spillover from Europe to Brazil. The implied forward-looking expectations for markets volatility had a strong and significant spillover effect onto Brazil, Russia and China, and a weaker effect on India.

Practical Implications

The evidence on volatility spillovers from the AEs markets to EMs puts into question the traditional view of financial and economic systems sustainability in the presence of higher orders of integration of the global monetary and financial systems. Overall, data suggest that we are witnessing less than perfect integration between BRIC economies and AEs markets to-date can offer some volatility hedging opportunities for investors.

Originality

Our chapter contributes to the growing literature on volatility spillovers from the AEs to the EMs in a number of ways. Firstly, we provide a formal analysis of the spillovers to the BRIC economies over the periods of recent crises. Secondly, we make new conclusions concerning longer-term spillovers as opposed to higher frequency volatility contagion covered by the previous literature. Thirdly, we consider a new channel for volatility contagion – the trade-weighted AEs volatility measure.

Details

Lessons from the Great Recession: At the Crossroads of Sustainability and Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-743-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2011

Paola Garrone, Lucia Piscitello and Yan Wang

Purpose – This chapter aims at investigating the impact of cross-border knowledge spillovers on technological innovation in the renewable energy sector.…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter aims at investigating the impact of cross-border knowledge spillovers on technological innovation in the renewable energy sector.

Methodology/approach – The analysis presented in the chapter assumes that technological knowledge exhibits several tacit elements and requires established connections to flow between countries. A new measure for knowledge spillovers is obtained by weighting international R&D stocks through bilateral trade flows. The country-level patenting activity is modelled through a knowledge production function. The sample includes 18 OECD countries over the 1990–2006 period. Estimates are obtained through panel data techniques.

Findings – Our econometric results show that international knowledge developed by other countries has positive effects on the focal country's innovation in renewable energy technologies. Cross-country linkages, rather than mere geographic proximity, are found to favour cross-country knowledge spillovers.

Impact – The research contributes to the design of energy innovation policies. Public R&D is confirmed to be a relevant input to energy innovation. Coordination between countries in energy R&D activities can be required, particularly when countries maintain mutual linkages.

Originality – This study adds empirical evidence on the effect of cross-country knowledge spillovers and on the channels through which technological knowledge diffuses globally. It contributes to the emerging empirical research on energy innovation.

Details

Entrepreneurship in the Global Firm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-115-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Takashi Matsuki, Kimiko Sugimoto and Yushi Yoshida

We examine how the degree of regional financial integration in African stock markets has evolved over the last eleven years. Despite increasing regional economic…

Abstract

We examine how the degree of regional financial integration in African stock markets has evolved over the last eleven years. Despite increasing regional economic cooperation, the process of stock market integration has been slow. To facilitate growth via developed financial markets but keep financial stability risk at a minimum, further regional integration should be promoted, and mild capital controls on non-African investors may be necessary. A Diebold-Yilmaz spillover analysis is applied to ten African stock markets for the period between August 2004 and January 2015. We examine spillovers among four regions and among individual countries. Regional integration, as measured by total spillovers in Africa, is increasing but remains very low. These spillovers were temporarily heightened during the global financial crisis. Cross-regional spillovers are high between Northern and Southern Africa. Asymmetric capital controls on African and non-African investors must be considered to foster further regional integration and to mitigate financial stability risk. This is one of the few studies to address the construction of the future architecture of regionally integrated stock markets in emerging countries.

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