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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Sharmistha Self

The purpose of this paper is to take a close look at factors that influence the choice and quality of healthcare received by ailing and elderly people in rural north…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to take a close look at factors that influence the choice and quality of healthcare received by ailing and elderly people in rural north India. The author is primarily interested in seeing what role is played by the presence of sons in the family, particularly co-residence with sons. In the absence of some broad-based social security arrangement in countries like India, older adults traditionally turn to living arrangement where the older adults are supported by their children or extended family. In a patriarchal society as India, such responsibility lies with the sons if one has son/s. Such dependence on sons explains preferential treatment towards younger sons as a justification for the care parents receive from sons in their advanced years. This culture of son preference behavior provides the context for this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical model is based on testing three inter-related research questions. First, the author asks whether having grown sons or living with son/s leads to up-front better quality of healthcare for parents. If the empirical analysis does not show support for this research question, the author broadens the research question to ask whether those with grown son/s or those that live with their son/s have a higher probability of seeing a trained medical professional as compared to some traditional healer. If the empirical analysis does not support the second question, the author further broadens the research question and asks whether those elderly who are sick are more likely to receive any healthcare (medical or traditional) if they have grown son/s or live with their son/s.

Findings

The results show that co-residence with a son does not have a statistically significant impact on the quality of healthcare received by the elderly individual. Additionally, not having a son also does not have a statistically significant impact on quality of healthcare received.

Research limitations/implications

For the purpose of the empirical analysis, the author utilizes World Bank's Living Standard Measurement Survey (LSMS) data collected from rural villages in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in India in 1997-1998. The dataset may be somewhat dated, but it provides relevant information which transcends time. Additionally, with economic growth and modernization, more and more young people in India have migrated away from rural areas in the recent decade. Thus, surveys carried out in the last decade by the National Family Health Surveys in India show very little evidence of elderly parent in rural areas living with their adult children. This practice seemed to be much more prevalent at the time of the LSMS survey of 1997-1998.

Practical implications

Contrary to popular expectation, the results show that co-residing with a son has no statistically significant impact on healthcare received by parents. Additionally, not having sons does not matter either.

Originality/value

The author finds relatively fewer studies done on factors that determine the choice of healthcare for the elderly, particularly relating to those that are ailing (for reasons other than simply aging) and with reference to their living arrangement. The present paper addresses this void in the literature and is expected to make a meaningful contribution in bridging this gap in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Abstract

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Families in Economically Hard Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-071-4

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sandhya R. Mahapatro, Arabinda Acharya and Pushpendra Singh

Changing demographic trends in India have resulted in a growing ageing population, and this poses many health challenges for older people. Lack of formal care institutions…

Abstract

Purpose

Changing demographic trends in India have resulted in a growing ageing population, and this poses many health challenges for older people. Lack of formal care institutions and social security nets further aggravate the situation. Living arrangements are, thus, expected to play a significant role in determining the healthcare needs of older people. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association of living arrangements with health among older people in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were drawn from the Building Knowledge Base on Population Ageing in India (2011). The health status of older people was measured by assessing chronic illness, self-rated health and limitations in activities of daily living. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of living arrangements on health outcomes. Further, a structural equation model was employed to observe whether poor health preceded co-residence.

Findings

Older people living in co-residential arrangements report more health disadvantages and older people with poor health prefer co-residence with their offspring. Perhaps the support, care and health awareness in co-residential arrangements helps older people obtain the healthcare interventions they require for the various illnesses they have had, and enable them to improve their ongoing health status.

Originality/value

The present study has extended the research on the relationship between health and living arrangements, and has also addressed the case of older people with poor health who prefer to stay in co-residential arrangements which has been taken up by limited studies.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Gianna Claudia Giannelli and Chiara Monfardini

Household arrangements and human capital investment decisions of young Italians with a high school diploma are analysed. A model of the choices of residing with parents or…

Abstract

Household arrangements and human capital investment decisions of young Italians with a high school diploma are analysed. A model of the choices of residing with parents or forming a new family, jointly with those of investing in either work experience, or further education, or stopping investment is estimated. The results show that family background has a major impact on the decision to study, housing costs induce co‐residence, and unemployment increases the probability of studying. Education policies subsidising university studies on a merit ground would thus reduce income inequality, housing allowances would favour marriage, and labour policies would have the side‐effect of decreasing university dropouts.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 21 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Euehun Lee and Karen M. Gibler

The Republic of Korea is experiencing demographic, economic, and cultural changes that may create demand for seniors housing in the coming decades. The population is…

Abstract

The Republic of Korea is experiencing demographic, economic, and cultural changes that may create demand for seniors housing in the coming decades. The population is rapidly ageing; pension income is becoming more prevalent; and attitudes are changing about co‐residence. More people are expressing interest in housing that allows for privacy and independence from family members. These changes indicate potential demand for alternatives such as seniors housing. To help specify demand models for seniors housing in South Korea, a survey of urban residents aged 50 and older is presented to identify preferences among those who are planning to live in seniors housing. Results indicate higher income, healthy South Koreans are more likely to plan to live in seniors housing. They are interested in housing that provides personal care, home care, social, and security services, without the financial and physical maintenance burden of a traditional home.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Shengdong Lin and Xue Ke

This paper aims to explore the way in which Chinese consumers integrate both global culture and local culture through the change of intergenerational residence in urban China.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the way in which Chinese consumers integrate both global culture and local culture through the change of intergenerational residence in urban China.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by semi‐structured interviews of 15 families from three cities in south China. All interview tapes were transcribed. A hermeneutic process is used to analyze the verbal context.

Findings

There is a new trend of intergenerational residence in urban China, living apart but close. Living apart is a result of equalization between generations in socio‐political power, whereas living close is a way for traditional value adapting to global environments. Further analysis suggests that the assimilation of socio‐political values rooted in individualistic cultures, unexpectedly, is for the purpose of collective goodness, and the performance of traditional moral values is shifting from the compulsory rule based on traditional social norms to the spontaneous rule based on human demand.

Research limitations/implications

These findings capture the richness of Chinese dialectical way of “glocalization,” which retains basic (often positive) elements of opposing perspectives by seeking a middle way. Such findings would be valuable for global marketers trying to enter the Chinese market.

Originality/value

This paper answers the question of how Chinese consumers accept the competitive advantages of global culture and at the same time keep the positive distinctiveness of the heritage culture.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Paula Fomby

Ambridge residents live with extended kin and non-family members much more often than the population of the United Kingdom as a whole. This chapter explores cultural…

Abstract

Ambridge residents live with extended kin and non-family members much more often than the population of the United Kingdom as a whole. This chapter explores cultural norms, economic need, and family and health care to explain patterns of coresidence in the village of Ambridge. In landed families, filial obligation and inheritance norms bind multigenerational families to a common dwelling, while scarcity of affordable rural housing inhibits residential independence and forces reliance on access to social networks and chance to find a home among the landless. Across the socioeconomic spectrum, coresidence wards off loneliness among unpartnered adults. Finally, for Archers listeners, extended kin and non-kin coresidence creates a private space where dialogue gives added dimensionality and depth to characters who would otherwise be known only through their interactions in public spaces.

Details

Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Javeed Ahamed Golandaj, Srinivas Goli and Kailash Chandra Das

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the pattern of living arrangements among the older population and perception about old age support in the Indian adult population.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the pattern of living arrangements among the older population and perception about old age support in the Indian adult population.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used India Human Development Survey (IHDS), 2004‐2005 data for empirical analyses. Bivariate and multivariate models are used as statistical analyses for this study. This study is an evidence‐based interpretation of living arrangements among older persons and perception about future living arrangement and financial assistance among current adult people.

Findings

It was found that 17 percent of older population lived with their spouse only; only 2 percent lived singly, and the rest of 85 percent elderly were living in co‐residence with children. A majority of women respondents are expecting their sons to live with them, to take care and provide financial and emotional support in their old age. This indicates that the family will continue to be a significant social institution for the care and support for the older population in India.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind, which, in addition, to living arrangement patterns of the older population, provides some insight about the expectations of the current adult generation about living and financial preferences in old age.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 33 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Neale R. Chumbler, John Fortney, Marisue Cody and Cornelia Beck

The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether family caregivers with a stronger sense of coherence (SOC) who are caring for community dwelling older adults…

Abstract

The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether family caregivers with a stronger sense of coherence (SOC) who are caring for community dwelling older adults with cognitive impairment are less likely to use mental health services. An adaptation of the Anderson behavioral model of access to health care was employed as a conceptual framework. Data were collected for 304 impaired older adult/family caregiver dyads. Caregiver mental health service use and sense of coherence were measures as well as predisposing factors (age, gender, race, education, type of familial relationship, family size, and co-residence with impaired family member), enabling factors (self-reported awareness of services, travel times to mental health services, social support, and insurance), and need factors (chronic health conditions and distress). The impaired elder’s age, level of physical impairment, and level of memory impairment were also examined. Logistic regression results indicated that caregivers who have a stronger SOC were less likely to use mental health services (OR=0.91, p=0.006). Other significant independent predictors of mental health service use were social support (OR=0.34, p=0.032) and caregivers aiding family members with higher levels of physical impairment (OR=1.14, p=0.033). The results of this study support clinicians and planners developing mental health services that use SOC to mitigate the detrimental effects of caregiving. Future research is needed to target effective measures to positively manipulate this variable.

Details

Chronic Care, Health Care Systems and Services Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-300-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Fumie Kumagai

Significant regional variations by prefecture level exist for the family and the elderly in Japan. This suggests that the Japanese family, and aging society as well, must…

Abstract

Significant regional variations by prefecture level exist for the family and the elderly in Japan. This suggests that the Japanese family, and aging society as well, must be studied carefully with close attention to the socio‐cultural characteristics specific to each region and community (Kumagai, 1997a, 1997b). Therefore, it is essential to move the unit of analysis down to the community level rather than the national or even prefecture (regional) level. Social practices and cultural characteristics specific to each region and community are difficult to measure and quantify. Upon careful examination of Japanese married women in the traditional extended family, the theoretical hypothesis was postulated: Whether in urban or rural regions, regardless of the place of residence, married women living with their mother‐in‐law are likely to seek work outside the home. A national random sample of 3,662 Japanese women was analyzed. In conducting Chi‐square significance tests, this hypothesis is proved to be valid. The most striking finding of this study is that working outside the home seems to be one of the effective alternatives adopted by married women in the traditional generational family household. When son’s wives are in the labor force, it is most likely to reduce intergenerational conflict, a negative aspect of co‐residence living arrangements. In other words, working outside the home helps to minimize intergenerational conflict with in‐laws ‐mothers‐in‐law, in particular). Thus, the qualitative analysis of the family can provide effective indicators for the in‐depth analysis of Japanese families. It is, therefore, necessary to propose welfare policies for the elderly in the same manner, rather than simply looking at national average statistics.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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