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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sandhya R. Mahapatro, Arabinda Acharya and Pushpendra Singh

Changing demographic trends in India have resulted in a growing ageing population, and this poses many health challenges for older people. Lack of formal care institutions…

Abstract

Purpose

Changing demographic trends in India have resulted in a growing ageing population, and this poses many health challenges for older people. Lack of formal care institutions and social security nets further aggravate the situation. Living arrangements are, thus, expected to play a significant role in determining the healthcare needs of older people. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association of living arrangements with health among older people in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were drawn from the Building Knowledge Base on Population Ageing in India (2011). The health status of older people was measured by assessing chronic illness, self-rated health and limitations in activities of daily living. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of living arrangements on health outcomes. Further, a structural equation model was employed to observe whether poor health preceded co-residence.

Findings

Older people living in co-residential arrangements report more health disadvantages and older people with poor health prefer co-residence with their offspring. Perhaps the support, care and health awareness in co-residential arrangements helps older people obtain the healthcare interventions they require for the various illnesses they have had, and enable them to improve their ongoing health status.

Originality/value

The present study has extended the research on the relationship between health and living arrangements, and has also addressed the case of older people with poor health who prefer to stay in co-residential arrangements which has been taken up by limited studies.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Juliet Bligh

The purpose of this paper is to explore how social housing providers could respond to residents living with dementia in non-specialist housing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how social housing providers could respond to residents living with dementia in non-specialist housing.

Design/methodology/approach

A research framework was developed from published material and used to assess how dementia friendly a national housing provider was, and what could be different. Electronic surveys were completed by 209 members of staff; semi-structured interviews with 18 senior managers and an external contractor; a customer focus group with five residents. A literature review and telephone interviews with housing providers identified current areas of innovation and good practice which informed the research recommendations.

Findings

There are ways a non-specialist social housing provider can develop dementia friendly services through developing a customer focused approach, staff awareness raising and training, and through working collaboratively with specialist statutory and non-statutory services across health and social care. These have the potential to impact positively on the quality of life of residents with dementia or caring for people with dementia.

Practical implications

Social housing providers should be considering their older residents, and how they can design and develop services to respond to specific needs.

Originality/value

There is limited understanding of how mainstream housing providers could and should develop an offer for their residents living with dementia. This research provides an assessment approach and has developed ideas about what this offer could look like.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Mohammed Laid Ouakouak, Bindu Arya and Michel Zaitouni

While some work on how employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) affect behavioral outcomes has been examined, less work simultaneously investigates…

Abstract

Purpose

While some work on how employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) affect behavioral outcomes has been examined, less work simultaneously investigates whether employee perceptions of internal and external CSR influence the behavioral outcomes of incumbent employees working in organizations. The purpose of this paper is to draw on social exchange theory arguments to investigate the direct and indirect effects of internal and external CSR practices on employee organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and intention to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted among 664 employees working in the banking sector in Kuwait. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to test the suggested hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal that both internal and external CSR activities are positively related to OCB and OCB is negatively associated with intention to quit. Results also show that distributive justice moderates the relationship between OCB and intention to quit.

Practical implications

These findings extend the literature on CSR and demonstrate that organizations engaged in CSR activities (internal and external) can enhance citizenship behaviors among employees and thereby increase retention rates.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates the importance of CSR activities in tax-free countries, particularly, in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region. Since employees in GCC countries are increasingly concerned about the CSR behaviors of organizations, CSR activities can allow local organizations to signal that they are good corporate citizens. Hence, CSR could be considered as a particularly critical source of competitive advantage for businesses in the region.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

T.H. Chowdary

Looks at India’s extensive use and promotion of, ICT and informatization of the Indian society to enable the spread of literacy, education and excellence. Addresses…

Abstract

Looks at India’s extensive use and promotion of, ICT and informatization of the Indian society to enable the spread of literacy, education and excellence. Addresses relevant issues and shows how development should be funded. Concludes India’s late start in ICT exploitation provides excellent lessons for developing countries and gives a number of bullet points to aid in direction.

Details

info, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Javeed Ahamed Golandaj and Karabasappa Gadigeppa Kallihal

Enormous amount of biomedical wastes (BMW) produced everyday across the world. Management of BMW depends on adherence to protocol. BMW management at generation point…

Abstract

Purpose

Enormous amount of biomedical wastes (BMW) produced everyday across the world. Management of BMW depends on adherence to protocol. BMW management at generation point, definitely, depends upon the awareness, attitudes and practises of health-care staff, the purpose of this study will assess the awareness, attitude and practise regarding different aspects of BMW.

Design/methodology/approach

An observational with appropriate checklists, and a cross-sectional study, involving questionnaires, was conducted during 7-24 January 2016. The existing system of BMW management, funds, resources, etc., knowledge, attitude and practises about BMW were assessed amongst 273 health-care workers in selected public health-care institutes of Karnataka.

Findings

Of 273 study participants, majority (54%) of them have not received any training pertaining to BMW. The results showed a poor level of knowledge and awareness of BMW management amongst health-care personnel. Merely, 43% of the participants correctly knew the categorization of BMW and its disposal in proper colour-coded bins/bags. Awareness is very poor amongst the lower age group, male participants, lab-technicians/pharmacists and supporting staff. Doctors were good at theoretical knowledge such as rules, legislation and public-health importance of BMW management than the practical aspects such as categorization and colour-coding. Further, the attitude of health-care staff is favourable about BMW. Immunization for hepatitis-B was very poor amongst waste handlers (43%).

Originality/value

As the awareness and practise regarding BMW management were poor across different health-care staff there is a need to conduct periodic training and regular monitoring with special focus on the proper use of personal protective equipment. Further, precautionary immunization should be provided, especially waste handlers and sanitary workers.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Nibedita Shankar Ray-Bennett, Denise Marsha Jeanor Corsel, Nimisha Goswami and Maqbul Hossain Bhuiyan

The quality and availability of sexual and reproductive health care are key determinants to reducing maternal mortalities and morbidities in disaster settings; yet, these…

Abstract

Purpose

The quality and availability of sexual and reproductive health care are key determinants to reducing maternal mortalities and morbidities in disaster settings; yet, these services are often lacking in developing countries. Reducing maternal mortality and morbidity is currently the main targets of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3. The purpose of this study was to develop an intervention package called RHCC (Reproductive Health Kit 8; Capacity building; Community awareness), and to implement and evaluate it in three primary health-care (PHC) facilities in Belkuchi, Bangladesh, in order to improve the quality and availability of post-abortion care (PAC) during the 2017 floods.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used both quantitative and qualitative methods to develop, implement and assess the RHCC in three flood-prone PHC facilities in Belkuchi.

Findings

The RHCC was implemented during the floods of 2017. The findings pre- and post-intervention suggest it led to an increase in skilled management among health workers, an increase in the quality of care for clients and the availability of PAC at three PHC facilities during floods.

Originality/value

Due to its geographic location, Bangladesh is exposed to recurrent floods and cyclones. Evidence-based integrated intervention packages, such as the RHCC, can improve the quality and availability of reproductive health care during disasters at PHC level and, in doing so, can promote the UN’s agenda on “disaster resilient health system” to achieve the SDG 3, and the WHO’s campaign on universal health coverage.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2018

Jannelien Wieland and Mascha ten Doesschate

In The Netherlands, curative mental health care and supportive care for people with an intellectual disability (ID) are organised in separate domains. Prevalence of mental…

Abstract

Purpose

In The Netherlands, curative mental health care and supportive care for people with an intellectual disability (ID) are organised in separate domains. Prevalence of mental health problems is known to be high among people with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) or mild intellectual disabilities (MID). By contrast, according to recent findings, prevalence of BIF and MID is high among patients in mental health care (17.5–58 per cent). In The Netherlands, a new quality standard of care (QSOC) on mental health care for people with BIF or MID is developed. It is designed to supplement existing guidelines on mental health care so that they can be used appropriately in people with BIF or MID and meant for use in both mental health care organisations (MHCO) as in organisations for ID care. To a large extent, the QSOC should describe the existing practice. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the existing practice in current mental health care for people with BIF or MID in The Netherlands, the authors examined the views and accessibility of MHCO on the mental health care for patients with and IQ<85. In addition, the authors reviewed published criteria for in- and exclusion of all 39 top clinical mental health care departments for criteria on BIF or (mild) ID.

Findings

The authors found there is a clear awareness of the high prevalence of BIF and MID among large Dutch MHCO. Dutch MHCO estimate the prevalence of BIF and MID among their patients to be around 30 per cent. Nonetheless, most MCHO surveyed (76 per cent) indicated they do not routinely estimate or measure IQ among their patients and 53 per cent of MHCO indicated not having knowledge and expertise on the dual diagnoses of mental health problems and BIF or MID. Fitting in with the new QSOC most of the MHCO (59 per cent) agreed on the statement in the survey that professionals should be able to treat patients with BIF or ID and all but one of the MHCO stated to have some form of collaboration with an institute for ID care.

Originality/value

The authors concluded there is a clear awareness of the high prevalence of BIF and MID among large Dutch MHCO. The new QSOC on mental health care for people with BIF or MID can help improve accessibility and quality of mental health care for these patients.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Ajit Shah, Chris Heginbotham, Bill Fulford, Jez Buffin and Karen Newbigging

This article considers the effectiveness of two one‐day events designed to raise awareness of The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) in BME communities. The events were held…

Abstract

This article considers the effectiveness of two one‐day events designed to raise awareness of The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) in BME communities. The events were held using specially developed materials and were evaluated with the help of a 12‐item questionnaire. The results of the evaluation showed that there was an increase in the proportion of correct responses for 10 of the 12 questions after attending awareness‐raising events. The total score for all correct responses on the 12‐item questionnaire significantly increased after attending the awareness‐raising events. Collectively, the findings suggest that the awareness‐raising events were able to improve awareness of the MCA among representatives of BME communities. Such awareness‐raising events should be encouraged by health and social care providers

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Mohsin Altaf, Nageena Tabassum and Sany Sanuri Mohd Mokhtar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of health-care quality of emergency medical services on brand equity of cardiac institutes by using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of health-care quality of emergency medical services on brand equity of cardiac institutes by using industry-specific measure, 5Qs model of health-care service quality (HCSQ).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey method technique has been used to collect data from the patients availing emergency medical services from 12 cardiac institutes. Effective responses have been received from 393 patients from four localities. Systematic sampling technique has been used to collect data from the respondents. Partial least square structural equation modeling using smartPLS 2.0 has been used to analyze the results.

Findings

Findings of the study reveal that HCSQ has weak relationship with hospital brand loyalty but strong relationship with brand image and brand awareness. Furthermore, brand awareness and brand image have strong relationship with brand loyalty. Furthermore, brand image and brand loyalty have strong relationship with overall hospital brand equity but found nonsignificant relationship of brad awareness with overall hospital brand equity.

Originality/value

The principal contribution of the paper is to provide the insight on the impact of emergency HCSQ on brand equity of the private cardiac hospitals. Second, this study is first in branding literature that has used industry-specific scale 5Qs model to measure the service quality of emergency medical care and its impact on private sector cardiac hospital’s brand equity. Previously researchers used generic scales that were insufficient to measure the service quality of specialized industries (Babakus and Mangold, 1992; Carman, 1990; Caro and Garcia, 2007).

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Charlotte Strümpel and Cornelia Hackl

Violence and abuse often occur within the immediate family. However, violence against older women in families is still a taboo topic and professionals who work in…

Abstract

Purpose

Violence and abuse often occur within the immediate family. However, violence against older women in families is still a taboo topic and professionals who work in community health and social services are often the only persons who have access to the target group. The purpose of this article is to describe research results and a training course developed within two linked European projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Both projects were divided into a research and a practical phase. In the first project, data were gathered via a literature review and interviews with health and social services staff. Additionally, a short survey of health and social services organisations, about what provisions they had for dealing with abuse against older women within families, was conducted. In Breaking the Taboo Two, research on existing training material for health care staff concerning violence against older women within families was carried out. Analysis of this material formed the basis for designing a two‐day training workshop for staff members in nine modules on aspects like defining and recognizing violence as well as intervention, cooperating with other organisations and caring for oneself.

Findings

A total of 14 trial workshops were carried out in Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Portugal and Slovenia in September and October 2011. The target groups ranged from nurses, home helps, care assistants and social workers to Red Cross volunteers from visiting services and crisis intervention. It was established that the topic is very relevant to the participants' work; however, it became clear that this is a very sensitive topic and participants need time to be able to talk openly about such sensitive issues. It also became clear that offering such workshops is an important pillar in developing service providers' policies and procedures concerning violence against older women and can contribute well to networking in this field.

Originality/value

No specific training courses on violence against older women for staff of health and social services could be found until now. This article highlights two projects that deal with raising awareness and training in this field. It also includes findings from a number of European countries that participated in the projects and combines findings gained from research and practical experience.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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