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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Teck Hong Tan

– The purpose of this paper is to determine how satisfied homeowners are with their gated residences.

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2082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how satisfied homeowners are with their gated residences.

Design/methodology/approach

This study starts out by examining the data collected through self-administered surveys to find out the satisfaction levels and motivations of homeowners toward their gated homes in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. This is then followed by regression analysis to examine the relationship between motivations of owing gated homes and residential satisfaction.

Findings

The benefits that motivate households to purchase gated landed homes are “Safety and Security,” “Financial Benefits” and “Social Status” and “Lifestyle Facilities.” It also appears that the satisfaction levels of homeowners are to a certain extent, influenced by the benefits of owning a gated home.

Research limitations/implications

It seems that when home buyers purchase houses these days, a major consideration is placed on whether or not the development is a gated one.

Practical implications

The congruence and dissonance between residents and their housing situations are essential to prevent the decreasing quality of urban environment. Thus, this study can serve as a guide for urban planners and property developers in planning and designing of enclosed private residential developments. Furthermore, property developers can gain valuable insights on the gated home features that they should improve to meet each homebuyer’s needs.

Originality/value

Majority of the studies on residential satisfaction have been focussed on the evaluation of non-enclosure communities. There have only been a limited of studies examining the experience of residents in enclosed private residential environments in a developing country. Hence, this paper has contributed to the existing knowledge in the development of gated estates in a developing country.

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Property Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Abstract

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Modelling Our Future: Population Ageing, Health and Aged Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-808-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Julia Styles

Wherever elderly individuals with diabetes reside, whether at home, in a residential home or in a nursing home, they deserve to have good‐quality, structured care provided…

Abstract

Wherever elderly individuals with diabetes reside, whether at home, in a residential home or in a nursing home, they deserve to have good‐quality, structured care provided by carers who have the relevant knowledge and skills. In order to achieve this carers need ongoing education and training. The evidence suggests that diabetes care in residential and nursing homes is varied and standards need to be improved. The literature points to education and training for care home staff as a central tenet to increasing the quality of diabetes care. This article reports the outcome of a collaborative approach to diabetes education and demonstrates that increased awareness in diabetes care is actively sought by staff working in residential and nursing homes. The teaching sessions reported were positively evaluated and demonstrated an increase in the knowledge of the participants. It is envisaged that this will be reflected in improved quality of diabetes care for elderly people. The author discusses the need to ensure that education and training is ongoing and recommends that policy makers, both at a national and local level, embrace the evidence and facilitate this process.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Linda Garvican and Graham Bickler

In view of the decline in the number of residential and nursing homes over the last few years, East Sussex, Brighton and Hove Health Authority was concerned about optimum…

Abstract

In view of the decline in the number of residential and nursing homes over the last few years, East Sussex, Brighton and Hove Health Authority was concerned about optimum usage of places. This project aimed to ascertain the views of home owners and managers on their working relationship with the health authority, local hospitals and social services.Respondents felt that the incoming residents were generally frailer and more dependent than a few years ago, funding allocations were inadequate, given the standards now expected of care homes, and there were delays of up to a year in reaching agreement. Several indicated that they would no longer take publicly funded clients unless the families could top up the payments. Ten percent of the private residential homes surveyed were for sale or due to close. Between 40 and 50 older people were estimated to be awaiting transfer to EMI or nursing homes in East Sussex. Over 35% of homes complained about inappropriate discharges of their residents from hospital, and a poor standard of nursing care. Communication with hospitals was poor and relationships with the health authority and social services needed strengthening. Routine admissions were appropriate, but hospital discharges may have been premature. Home owners/managers were dissatisfied with their relationship with the NHS. Improvements are needed if partnership working is to be developed.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Deidre Wild, Sara Nelson and Ala Szczepura

A three‐year in‐depth study has examined three models to improvecare in residential homes for older people in England. The study showed that each aimed to provide a ‘home

Abstract

A three‐year in‐depth study has examined three models to improvecare in residential homes for older people in England. The study showed that each aimed to provide a ‘home for life’ for residents. Using multi‐source data gained from a range of qualitative and quantitative methods involving residential home managers, care staff and extensive review of documentation related to key care functions, inhibitors and enhancers to the achievement of this aim were identified. Inhibitors were lack of available top‐up funding to meet increased care needs, care staff's inadequate knowledge of behaviour‐disordered residents, workload, cross‐sector barriers and environmental problems. Among the enhancers were flexible regulation, up‐skilling of care staff, care staff's achievement in palliative care, perceived avoidance of hospital admission, and sound practice‐led relationships with nurses. The implications for practice are of relevance to policy makers, educators, community health and social care professionals, and older residents, their relatives and representative organisations.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Lori Weeks

This research examined how moving to a residential care home, a specific form of long‐term care facility, influences the quality of the relationship between seniors and…

Abstract

This research examined how moving to a residential care home, a specific form of long‐term care facility, influences the quality of the relationship between seniors and their family members and how policies in these homes can facilitate relationships between residents and their family members. In this exploratory study, a total of five non‐spousal family members participated in a focus group discussion, and an additional 10 family members participated in face‐to‐face interviews. The two main themes that emerged identified that admission to a long‐term care facility had no influence on family relationships, or it had a positive influence on family relationships. The respondents identified how policies in the home can maintain or enhance family relationships. In particular, they appreciated very flexible policies that included few restrictions on when and where they could interact with their relatives and appreciated facilities providing private spaces to accommodate family interaction. The results of this study, and future research, will aid administrators in long‐term care facilities to develop policies that most support and enhance the experience of seniors and their ongoing relationship with their family members.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Thomas Madritsch

The purpose of this paper is the introduction of a best practice tool in order to analyze operating costs in the health care sector. This study presents the findings by…

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1168

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is the introduction of a best practice tool in order to analyze operating costs in the health care sector. This study presents the findings by using a new innovative benchmarking tool to analyze operating costs, identify cost drivers and highlight the potential savings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on a survey of operating and maintenance costs from 18 residential homes in Tyrol, Austria. In order to determine the volume and to prioritize the cost drivers, CAREB (Computer‐aided Real Estate Benchmarking) software was used, which was developed by the Institute of Real Estate Benchmarking at the University of Applied Sciences KufsteinTirol, Austria. Statistic analysis was conducted to investigate savings potential, determine the best case of the sample and submit recommendations to the decision‐makers.

Findings

Compared to conventional benchmarking methods, this model allows a holistic view on the key factors of cost drivers and reveals the savings potential for each dimension. The key figure which reveals the largest potential gives an indication of whether a residential home has general problems with efficiency (high costs per bed), with occupancy (costs per resident) or with the space efficiency (costs per average space consumption). Furthermore, the study reveals the immense savings potential in the costs of various services.

Research limitations/implications

The paper identifies the volume and structure of the cost drivers of operating costs of buildings in the health care sector by using a new innovative benchmarking tool. This survey is based on the operating costs. Other running costs such as costs for health care personnel as well as quality indicators are not considered in this survey.

Practical implications

The results should help to establish cost benchmarking increasingly and develop it as a strategic planning tool in order to support management in the health care sector in the decision‐making process.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new measuring method which allows a holistic view of the influencing cost factors to investigate weak points in cost efficiency for the health care sector.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

Martin R.J. Knapp, Sarah Curtis and Ernestini Giziakis

The present range and character of child‐care services in Britain have evolved erratically over a long period of time. Structured by a succession of Acts of Parliament…

Abstract

The present range and character of child‐care services in Britain have evolved erratically over a long period of time. Structured by a succession of Acts of Parliament, shaped and re‐shaped by the changing pattern of social values, needs and expectations, current provision is both complex and comprehensive. Statutory and voluntary bodies now provide preventive services, shelter and treatment for both the deprived and the delinquent, for the able‐bodied and the handicapped, for infants and for adolescents. Often this care will be provided in the child's own home or in a foster home, but at any one time roughly 40 per cent of the 120,000 children and young persons that are today the responsibility of local authorities will be resident in a children's home.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Karim Hadjri, Verity Faith and Maria McManus

This study seeks to appraise the design of nursing and residential care homes for people with dementia in Northern Ireland using the design audit checklist developed by…

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1266

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to appraise the design of nursing and residential care homes for people with dementia in Northern Ireland using the design audit checklist developed by the Dementia Services Development Centre – DSDC.

Design/methodology/approach

The appraisal used postal questionnaires, based on the DSDC essential design criteria, that were sent to facility managers. This was conducted in order to establish the level of compliance with these criteria to achieve a dementia‐friendly home, and to ascertain whether there are any noticeable differences between nursing homes and residential care homes.

Findings

The study identified the types of homes that were seen as failing to meet most of the DSDC design criteria and, in particular, which criteria are not met according to their managers. Results from this sample suggest that nursing homes align better with DSDC criteria than residential care homes. The study concludes that the majority of managers perceive their care homes to meet over 50 percent of the essential criteria, with just over 5 percent below the 50 percent mark.

Research limitations/implications

Given that this study used postal questionnaires more research is needed in order to validate results. Behavioral and policy implications are crucial aspects that will be the subject of future research which will involve post‐occupancy evaluation.

Practical implications

More attention to dementia‐friendly building design needs to be taken into consideration by residential care homes, and more improvement would still be required by nursing homes not meeting all criteria.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of dementia‐friendly building design and the requirements for more care in designing and fitting care environments for people with dementia.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

John Dow

This article looks at the new legal framework for the regulation of residential and nursing home care. It focuses on the changes to the law, regulations and guidance and…

Abstract

This article looks at the new legal framework for the regulation of residential and nursing home care. It focuses on the changes to the law, regulations and guidance and examines critically whether these changes are likely to lead to higher standards.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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