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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2022

Abdul Karim Khan, Maria Khalid, Nida Abbas and Shehryar Khalid

This study aims to examine the impact of COVID-19-related job insecurity on two types of employees’ behaviors: family undermining and withdrawal. This study also proposes…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of COVID-19-related job insecurity on two types of employees’ behaviors: family undermining and withdrawal. This study also proposes emotional exhaustion as a mediator and symmetrical internal communication as a moderator in the relationship between COVID-19-related job insecurity and employees’ behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a time-lagged design, data were gathered from 193 employees working in Pakistan’s hospitality sector. Structural equation modeling in AMOS and PROCESS Macro were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that COVID-19-related job insecurity is positively related to family undermining and withdrawal behaviors, and these associations are mediated by emotional exhaustion. Furthermore, symmetrical internal communication weakens the positive influence of COVID-19-related job insecurity on emotional exhaustion. Additionally, the indirect impact of COVID-19-related job insecurity on employees’ behavioral outcomes via emotional exhaustion is stronger for employees with low symmetrical internal communication than for those with high levels of symmetrical internal communication.

Practical implications

Hospitality management needs to focus on transparent and horizontal communication patterns to reduce the ensuing negative behaviors from COVID-19-related job insecurity.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the impact of COVID-19-related job insecurity on two types of employees’ behaviors: family undermining and withdrawal. This study also offers new insights via mediating mechanisms and moderators associated with the relationship between COVID-19-related job insecurity and employees’ behavioral reactions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Shengxian Yu, Shanshi Liu and Chao Xu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of job insecurity on employee silence by developing a moderated mediation model. The model focuses on the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of job insecurity on employee silence by developing a moderated mediation model. The model focuses on the mediating role of ego depletion underpinning the relationship between job insecurity on employee silence and the moderating role of perceived coworker support and career growth opportunity in influencing the mediation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducts a questionnaire from 309 employees of six Chinese financial enterprises in two waves, with a one-month interval between the two waves. Moreover, this study uses bootstrapping and confirmatory factor analysis to verify the hypothesis.

Findings

Job insecurity has a significant positive impact on employee silence, and ego depletion partly mediated the relationship between job insecurity and employee silence. Perceived coworker support and career growth opportunity negatively moderated the relationship between job insecurity and ego depletion and also moderated the indirect effect of job insecurity on employee silence through ego depletion.

Practical implications

The study provides evidence for the positive effects of job insecurity on ego depletion, which, in turn, is significantly associated with employee silence. It highlights the important role of perceived coworker support and career growth opportunities in reducing employee negative perceptions and behaviors.

Originality/value

This empirical study provides preliminary evidence of the mediating role of ego depletion in the positive relationship between job insecurity and employee silence. The moderated mediation model also extends the existing finding by adding substantive moderators (perceived coworker support and career growth opportunity) to explain how the effect of job insecurity on employees’ behaviors unfolds.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2022

Bindu Chhabra and Pallavi Pandey

Drawing upon the conservation of resource (COR) theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating role of knowledge hiding in the relationship between job

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the conservation of resource (COR) theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating role of knowledge hiding in the relationship between job insecurity and two dimensions of thriving at work, i.e. learning and vitality. The study further aims to investigate the moderating role of benevolent leadership in the aforementioned mediating relationship by applying the moderated mediation framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for the study consisted of employees working in service sector in India. The hypotheses were tested with two wave survey data collected from 365 employees during the COVID-19 pandemic when the Indian Government was lifting phase wise restrictions. Data was analyzed using mediation and moderated mediation analyses on PROCESS v 3.0 macro.

Findings

Results showed that knowledge hiding mediated the relationship between job insecurity and both dimensions of thriving at work. Further, benevolent leadership was seen to moderate the mediated relationship providing support for the moderated mediation framework.

Practical implications

The results highlight the significance of providing benevolent leadership training to the managers to help them cope with the anxiety arising out of job insecurity. Further, employees need to be cautioned regarding the deleterious effects of knowledge hiding, which can impede their own learning and vitality.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the mediating role of knowledge hiding in the relationship between job insecurity and thriving. Further, the role played by benevolent leadership in mitigating the harmful effects of job insecurity especially during COVID-19 pandemic is a unique contribution of the study.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2022

Prashant Mehta

This sudden disruption of work in the world due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to unravelling situations hitherto unknown to researchers and…

Abstract

Purpose

This sudden disruption of work in the world due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to unravelling situations hitherto unknown to researchers and therefore requires careful and thorough investigation. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between work from home (WFH) isolation, WFH loss of task identity and job insecurity amid COVID-19 pandemic WFH arrangements by focusing on information technology/information technology-enabled services (IT/ITES) sector employees in India. The study also investigated the mediating role of work alienation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from IT/ITES sector employees who were working from home. The sample size was 312, with 71.8% males and 28.2% females. The study used a descriptive research design. Analysis of the data was carried out using partial least square structural equation modeling. All constructs–independent and dependent–were reflectively measured. The evaluated quality parameters (discriminant validity, reliability, collinearity, common method bias) for all the constructs were found to be within acceptable limits.

Findings

Findings from the study indicate that WFH-related isolation and loss of task identity have a significant direct impact on job insecurity. These, along with the mediating construct of work alienation, predicted a 35.8% variance in job insecurity. The study found that work alienation provided complementary mediation between the independent constructs evaluated.

Originality/value

This study attempts to scrape the surface and gain insight into the problems that may arise in the new world of work. This paper presents an attempt to explain some of the psychological pitfalls associated with WFH during the COVID-19 pandemic and to understand their impact on job insecurity.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 April 2011

Andrew S. Fullerton, Dwanna L. Robertson and Jeffrey C. Dixon

Purpose – In this chapter, we examine individual- and country-level differences in perceived job insecurity in the 27 European Union countries (EU27) within a multilevel…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter, we examine individual- and country-level differences in perceived job insecurity in the 27 European Union countries (EU27) within a multilevel framework.

Design/methodology/approach – We primarily focus on cross-national differences in perceived job insecurity in the EU27 and consider several possible explanations of it, including flexible employment practices, economic conditions, labor market structure, and political institutions. We examine both individual- and country-level determinants using multilevel partial proportional odds models based on individual-level data from the 2006 Eurobarometer 65.3 and country-level data from a variety of sources.

Findings – We find that European workers feel most insecure in countries with high unemployment, low union density, low levels of part-time and temporary employment, relatively little social spending on unemployment benefits, and in post-socialist countries.

Research limitations/implications – The findings from this study suggest that flexible employment practices do not necessarily cause workers to feel insecure in their jobs. This is likely due to the different nature of part-time and temporary employment in different institutional contexts.

Originality/value – This study is one of the most comprehensive accounts of perceived job insecurity in Europe given the focus on a larger number of countries and macro-level explanations for perceived job insecurity.

Details

Comparing European Workers Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-947-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Peter J. Jordan, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Sandra A. Lawrence

Purpose: During turbulent social and economic times, perceptions of job insecurity can be expected to increase. In this chapter, we outline a theoretical model that links…

Abstract

Purpose: During turbulent social and economic times, perceptions of job insecurity can be expected to increase. In this chapter, we outline a theoretical model that links perceptions of job insecurity to lower affective commitment and high work-related stress, resulting in employees' engaging in poor decision-making behavior. We argue further that employees who possess individual skills of being aware of emotions and managing emotions are less susceptible to such behavior. Study Design/Methodology/Approach: We tested our model in two studies. The first study was conducted using an online sample of 217 respondents. The second study used a split administration design conducted in a single organization and used a sample of 579 employees. Findings: Our data revealed that job insecurity is linked to negative decision-making behaviors and that better emotional awareness and management skills may reduce negative decision-making behaviors. Originality/Value: Our findings support the notion of threat rigidity theory where we found that job insecurity affects how individuals make decisions. Our analysis suggests that the individual's level of emotional skills can act as a form of behavioral control that can ameliorate the effects of job insecurity on decision-making behavior. Research Limitations: Both studies had a female gender bias in our sampling frames. There is a possibility of common method variance affecting the results of Study 1, and both studies involved the use of a self-report measure of emotional skills.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Rinki Dahiya

With the enhancing notions of job insecurity in employees, the objective of this study is to revisit the association between job insecurity and employee performance…

Abstract

Purpose

With the enhancing notions of job insecurity in employees, the objective of this study is to revisit the association between job insecurity and employee performance behaviour (task performance and contextual performance) with the mediating role of organizational identification. Specifically, the study examines how and why there is a negative link between job insecurity and performance and whether organizational identification may serve as a mediating mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lagged survey of 192 employees having heterogeneous working background was analysed using the structural equation modelling (SEM) technique.

Findings

The findings highlight that the nexus between job insecurity and organizational citizenship behaviour is fully mediated by organizational identification. However, the organizational identification partially mediated the association between job insecurity and task performance.

Originality/value

The tendency of job insecurity in India is on the rise. This investigation gives a more profound comprehension of behavioural responses of job insecurity on employee performance behaviour with the social identity theoretical perspective. The study contributes to the extant literature by revisiting the model proposed by Piccoli et al. (2017) and includes organizational identification as a mediating mechanism, which has remained unexplored till now in the context of Indian manufacturing industry.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Pushpendra Priyadarshi and Rajesh Premchandran

Data were collected using a survey questionnaire of 379 participants from business process outsourcing (BPO) organizations affected by robotic process automation (RPA)…

Abstract

Purpose

Data were collected using a survey questionnaire of 379 participants from business process outsourcing (BPO) organizations affected by robotic process automation (RPA). Structural equation modelling and hierarchical regression analysis were used to test the hypothesized relationships between the study variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a moderated-mediation model examining the relationships between uncertainty around changes due to RPA, neuroticism and job insecurity, and turnover intentions among BPO employees in India.

Findings

Uncertainty around RPA and neuroticism cause job insecurity among employees resulting in their intent to quit the organization. Further, the impact of job insecurity is influenced by employees' commitment to automation. Outlining the ways in which RPA-driven change impacts employees and organizations, our findings underscore the need for upskilling the affected employees besides developing coping mechanisms as a buffer to the negative impacts of large-scale automation-driven transformation in the industry under study.

Originality/value

Amidst the debate around the impact of RPA in developing countries, our research is the first attempt to systematically examine how RPA has led to concerns around job security leading to turnover intention among employees in the Indian BPO sector. It uniquely highlights the role of personality besides the issue of growing uncertainty due to RPA, requiring the immediate attention of organizations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Sumera Saeed, Ibne Hassan, Ghulam Dastgeer and Tehrim Iqbal

The current study focuses on the role of antecedents to prevent perceived job insecurity and mitigate its negative impacts on work-related well-being. The study examined…

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Abstract

Purpose

The current study focuses on the role of antecedents to prevent perceived job insecurity and mitigate its negative impacts on work-related well-being. The study examined variables of the resourceful environment (effective organizational communication and involvement), conserved resources (perceived employability and emotional exhaustion) and resource loss (job insecurity) by drawing on the Conservation of Resources (COR) theory for predicting the work-related well-being adding the moderating role of boundaryless career orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 306 salespersons of pharmaceutical companies working in Pakistan was obtained. The hypothesized relationships were tested through structural equation modeling in SmartPLS.

Findings

The results confirmed showed that the organizational communication, employee involvement and perceived employability reduce the perceived job insecurity; however, the emotional exhaustion was positively related. It also confirmed the moderating effect of boundaryless career orientation on relationship of job insecurity and well-being.

Practical implications

To make employees engaged, the organizations are required to involve employees by sharing knowledge, information and power to make decisions, value their opinion and ensuring the employability. Further, salespersons having a preference of a boundaryless career proved to mitigate negative impact of job insecurity on work-related well-being.

Originality/value

Many empirical studies have identified that the perceived job insecurity is one of the major concerns affecting employee's well-being. However, few studies simultaneously have sought to prevent the perceived job insecurity among employees. The findings are important in developing the understanding that how salespersons perceive their capabilities and the work environment of the organization, this perception; resultantly, can influence their behaviors particularly the work engagement dimension of well-being.

研究目的

本研究的焦點為探討導致僱員感到缺乏職業安全的成因, 對防止該感覺的產生扮演著什麼角色,並研究導致缺乏職業安全感的成因,就減少缺乏職業安全感給和工作有關的幸福感所帶來的負面影響方面扮演著什麼角色。研究應用了可預測與工作相關的幸福感的資源保留理論 (COR) ,來探討資源豐富的環境 (有效的機構溝通及參與) 、節約資源 (感知的受僱能力與情緒耗竭) 及資源耗損 (缺乏職業安全) 這些變數,並加入了無邊界職業生涯定向的調節角色。

研究設計/方法/理念

研究樣本為在巴基斯坦工作的306名製藥公司營業員。研究人員透過SmartPLS的結構方程模型來測試各假設的關係。

研究結果

研究結果確認了組織溝通、僱員參與及感知的受僱能力均會減輕職業不安全的感覺;唯情緒耗竭則成正相關。研究結果亦確認了無邊界職業生涯定向在缺乏職業安全與幸福感之間的相互關係上起著調節效應。

原創性/價值

過去許多實證研究均已證實缺乏職業安全感是影響僱員幸福感的一個主要因素,唯很少研究會同時透過探討資源豐富的環境 (有效的機構溝通及參與) 和節約資源 (感知的受僱能力和情緒耗竭) 等變數,來嘗試防止僱員產生職業不安全的感覺。本研究的結果至為重要、因它使我們更了解營業員對自己的能力及機構的工作環境的看法、最終會影響他們的工作行為,特別是幸福感的工作投入層面。

關鍵詞

缺乏職業安全感、營業員、工作投入、與工作相關的幸福感、無邊界職業生涯定向

文章種類

研究論文

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Dae‐seok Kang, Jeff Gold and Daewon Kim

This paper aims to focus on a career perspective to investigate the association between employee experience of job insecurity and work‐related behaviors, specifically…

3513

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on a career perspective to investigate the association between employee experience of job insecurity and work‐related behaviors, specifically discretionary extra‐role and impression management behaviors. A second purpose is to analyze the interaction effect of perceived employability and job insecurity on extra‐role and impression management behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 207 supervisor‐subordinate dyads in Korean banking and financial institutions, the relationships between job insecurity and extra‐role or impression management as two career behaviors are tested. The interaction effects of employability and job insecurity on behavioral options are also tested.

Findings

The results showed that the perception of job insecurity led to both reduced extra‐role and impression management behavior and the intensity of withdrawal increased as employability increased.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide a fundamental new insight into how a careerist orientation functions in the age of job insecurity.

Practical implications

Extra‐role and impression management behaviors may be an individual's method of career management, especially in the context of job insecurity, allowing managers to capture a more dynamic picture of an individual's career choice in a new employment relationship.

Originality/value

The paper adopts a career perspective in investigating employee extra‐role and impression management behaviors under conditions of declining job security. It adds further value by showing the moderating effect of employability on such behaviors.

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