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Article

Arjun Chakravorty and Pankaj Singh

This study aims to examine the correlates of burnout among primary school teachers working with public schools in Chhattisgarh-India.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the correlates of burnout among primary school teachers working with public schools in Chhattisgarh-India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 713 teachers using a questionnaire survey. Using partial least square path modeling, this study tests the proposed measurement and structural model.

Findings

The study confirmed that general job demands and emotional job demands in a school environment significantly correlated with burnout, which, in turn, has increased somatic symptoms and decreased pro-social behavior among teachers. However, the association of burnout with absenteeism was insignificant. Emotional intelligence (EI) was found to buffer the adverse associations of general job demands and emotional job demands on burnout.

Practical implications

The findings of this study demonstrate that EI has buffering effects on high job demands that consequently reduce burnout. This will help educators and policymakers in shaping and formulating effective policies and practices to deal with burnout.

Originality/value

Earlier studies exploring burnout of primary school teachers, especially in the Indian context, had focused exclusively on demographic factors. This study is an early attempt to understand the impact of contextual factors on burnout thereby helping in designing appropriate interventions thereof. This study additionally rationalizes the unexplored association of burnout with pro-social behavior among educators.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Book part

Margaret Hogarth

Burnout has been recognized and measured in the workplace since the 1970s, particularly in service industries. Libraries can be viewed as service providers. Burnout is the…

Abstract

Burnout has been recognized and measured in the workplace since the 1970s, particularly in service industries. Libraries can be viewed as service providers. Burnout is the result of chronically high work demands combined with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishment. Burnout components have been linked to physical, emotional, and behavioral consequences, and to high turnover and loss of engagement. Libraries can evaluate burnout levels among staff and address burnout on an individual, management, and organizational level. The Nurse-Experienced Time Pressure, Burnout, and Patient Interaction Questionnaire is modified to identify and quantify activities individuals might use to reduce burnout. The survey is administered to librarians and staff at an academic library and to self-chosen attendees at a conference session on avoiding burnout. Feedback is also solicited in terms of burnout avoidance strategies and possible library responses. Most respondents feel burned out but also committed to providing excellent service to patrons. Respondents have a genuine interest in making work less prone to burnout. Sample sizes were small but gave consistent responses. Burnout can be addressed on an institutional, management, and personal level, with each entity having equal responsibility. Leadership, management, communication, and support efforts can counteract burnout threats. Burnout causes disengagement at work and in personal lives. In terms of personality, neuroticism is a strong predictor of burnout. Making efforts to counteract burnout will lead to a healthier, balanced life. This book chapter is based on research done for a presentation at ER&L 2016 on Avoiding E-Burnout. Causes and counteractions to burnout have been expanded.

Details

Emotion in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-083-9

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Article

Maria Tresita Paul V, Nimitha Aboobaker and Uma Devi N

Drawing from the work-home resources model and the conservation of resources theory, this study examines the potential of family incivility in instigating burnout and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the work-home resources model and the conservation of resources theory, this study examines the potential of family incivility in instigating burnout and reduced job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed structured questionnaires to collect data from a sample of 290 doctors working in tertiary care hospitals across India. Measurement modeling was done using IBM AMOS 23.0 and PROCESS macro was employed for hypothesis testing.

Findings

The study revealed that family incivility has a positive spillover effect on burnout, subsequently leading to lowered levels of job satisfaction. Furthermore, burnout mediated the aforementioned relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, and a longitudinal study will help test more rigorously; the causal relationships between the focal variables are recommended. Self-report data pose limitations concerning common method bias. Data collected from different occupations and cultures would help with further generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

This study establishes that incivility within the family can negatively affect various vital work outcomes. Accordingly, it is recommended for organizations to support employees to achieve improved work-family integration. Further research should explore various coping strategies that will help with mitigating these spillover effects.

Social implications

This study offers a new perspective on the negative effect of family interactions on work-domain outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper extends the scholarly literature on stress and work-family interface by demonstrating that family incivility has spillover effects. This is the pioneering study that examines family incivility as a home demand causing long-term severe damages at work.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Sadegh Farivar and Osveh Esmaeelinezhad

Recent research highlights the necessity to critically examine the factors that can reduce the relationship between job stressors, such as job demand and burnout, to…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research highlights the necessity to critically examine the factors that can reduce the relationship between job stressors, such as job demand and burnout, to create healthier workplaces. This study aims to explore how five types of motivations (extrinsic motivation-social, extrinsic motivation- material, introjected, identified and intrinsic motivation), in combination with extraversion trait influence the impact of job demands on job burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a set-theoretic approach named fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis to analyze the data collected from 84 employees working in an research and development department of a public organization.

Findings

Findings revealed two distinct configurations. First, the absence of intrinsic and identified motivations lead to job burnout if extraverted participants suffer from high job demands. Second, non-extraverted participants reported high job burnout in the presence of high job demands, although all five types of motivations drove them.

Practical implications

This study suggests managers need to consider personalized preventive actions, depending on the level of extraversion trait when they try to motivate their employees who are dealing with high levels of job demands.

Originality/value

The emerging trend in social science suggests adopting linearity assumptions to study social phenomena is inconsistent with the reality of human behavior. Thus, this study used fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis to examine the complex interplay among all five types of motivations, extraversion trait, job demands, which contribute to burnout.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Yongzhan Li, Yongxin Li and Gloria Castaño

To fill the previous research gap, focusing on two constructs, i.e. perceived supervisor support (PSS) and psychological capital (PsyCap), this study aims to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

To fill the previous research gap, focusing on two constructs, i.e. perceived supervisor support (PSS) and psychological capital (PsyCap), this study aims to explore the mechanism underlying the relationship between teaching–research conflict (TRC) and job burnout among university teachers using the lens of job demands–resources (JD-R) model.

Design/methodology/approach

First, theoretically grounded hypotheses linking teaching–research conflict, PSS and PsyCap to job burnout were formulated. Then, a cross-sectional design was used to test the theoretical model presented in this study.

Findings

The results showed that TRC was positively linked to emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP), but negatively linked to personal accomplishment; PSS moderated the effect of TRC on both EE and DP but did not act as a moderator in the relationship between TRC and personal accomplishment; and PsyCap moderated the effect of TRC on all the three dimensions of job burnout.

Research limitations/implications

Given that the data were collected from single-source, the study was vulnerable to the common method variance. Besides, the relative small sample size limits the representativeness of the sample. Moreover, the cross-sectional design cannot confirm causal relationship between variables. Despite these limitations, the findings of this research can potentially inform effective interventions aimed at reducing the effect of TRC on job burnout among university teachers.

Originality/value

Based on the JD-R model, PSS and PsyCap are used to explore the effect of TRC on job burnout for the first time.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Shalini Srivastava and Banasree Dey

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of workplace bullying on job burnout of employees and investigate the mediating role of hardiness in the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of workplace bullying on job burnout of employees and investigate the mediating role of hardiness in the relationship and the extent to which the mediation is moderated by emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The present data were collected from 350 employees working in varied companies in the ITES-BPO sectors of Delhi NCR of India. The study used stratified sampling method for good coverage from different departments of the organizations. The present data were collected in two stages following the suggestion given by Podsakoff et al. (2003) so as to minimize common method bias.

Findings

The findings suggest that workplace bullying is positively related to job burnout, and workplace bullying is negatively associated with hardiness. Hardiness was also found to be negatively associated with job burnout. It has also been found that workplace bullying is associated with job burnout through hardiness, and emotional intelligence moderates the relationship between hardiness and job burnout. The results also indicate that the indirect effect of workplace bullying on job burnout via hardiness is conditional on emotional intelligence.

Research limitations/implications

As the present study pertains to only one part of India, i.e. Delhi NCR of India, the results cannot be generalized. Future research can take a larger sample for the same. The demographic variables’ effect was out of the scope of this study. If demographics were taken into consideration, it might have resulted in interesting results. Moreover, the employees who were physically present at the time of data collection were asked to respond in a given time frame. One might argue that employees were not given enough time to respond. Future work can also incorporate other sectors so as to do a comparative study between sectors.

Practical implications

Based on the study results, it may be suggested that managers may do well to devise strategies for coping with the phenomenon of workplace bullying and job burnout in employees, to provide a healthy work environment with better employee morale and enhanced productivity.

Social implications

The findings of the study have implications for organizations in the service sector, particularly the BPO-ITES sector examined in the study. This being a customer-focused industry expects employees to ensure meeting deadlines and enhanced customer satisfaction; therefore, it would be worthwhile for managers to help employees in dealing with job stressors in their work environment. It would be useful to raise awareness about workplace bullying and encourage employees to report such incidents while assuring the complete support of the management.

Originality/value

While a review of extant literature indicates that emotional intelligence may lead to a reduction in job burnout of employees, yet, emotional intelligence has not been used previously as a moderator in mitigating the influence of workplace bullying and job burnout. Moreover, the role of hardiness as a mediator in the above-mentioned relationships has not been addressed in previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Shu-Chuan Chen and Ching-Fu Chen

Healthcare is recognized as a fertile field for service research, and due to the fact that nurses are stressed physically and emotionally, reducing burnout among frontline…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare is recognized as a fertile field for service research, and due to the fact that nurses are stressed physically and emotionally, reducing burnout among frontline healthcare staff is an emerging and important research issue. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible antecedents and consequences of nurses’ burnout and to examine the moderating effects of personal trait and work-environment issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on Bagozzi’s (1992) reformulation of attitude theory (appraisal→emotional response→behavior), data from a survey of 807 nurses working in a major hospital in Taiwan were analyzed using the structural equation modeling technique and hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The results reveal the positive causality between job stressors and nurses’ burnout, whereas supervisor support negatively relates to burnout. In addition, the full moderating effects of leadership effectiveness and partly moderating effect of emotional intelligence on the relationships among job demands, job resources, and burnout are confirmed.

Practical implications

The findings provide practical insight regarding how supervisors play an essential role in alleviating nurses’ burnout. The supportive attitude and leadership effectiveness are recommended to be effectual managerial strategies.

Originality/value

The empirical results support the job demands-resources model by applying reformulation of attitude theory. The work-environment issue surpasses the personal trait in moderating the relationships among job demands, job resources, and burnout.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Mingzheng Wu, Xiaoling Sun, Delin Zhang and Ci Wang

This study aimed to develop a moderated mediation model to explain the relationship between perceived organizational justice and the counterproductive work behavior (CWB…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to develop a moderated mediation model to explain the relationship between perceived organizational justice and the counterproductive work behavior (CWB) of Chinese public servants. In this model, the authors assumed that job burnout mediates the relationship between perceived organizational justice and CWB and that moral identity moderates the relationship between job burnout and CWB.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 210 public servants in China participated in this study, and their characteristics were measured by self-report tools. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to test the moderated mediation model.

Findings

Analysis of the data demonstrated that perceived organizational justice, job burnout and moral identity influenced CWB. Moral identity moderated the relationship between job burnout and CWB, such that individuals with low moral identity are more likely to engage in CWB. Moreover, job burnout mediated the effect of perceived organizational justice on CWB, and the mediating effect of job burnout was moderated by moral identity. The indirect effect of perceived organizational justice on CWB through job burnout was significant among individuals with low moral identity but not among individuals with high moral identity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight the self-regulatory function of moral identity in preventing CWB.

Practical implications

The study offers several significant suggestions to reduce CWB in Chinese public sector administration, such as by improving organizational justice perception, recruiting and selecting individuals with reference to their moral identity and monitoring employees’ job burnout regularly.

Originality/value

The authors developed and verified a moderated mediated model on the relationship between perceived organizational justice and CWB. The study revealed that job burnout has a mediating effect on the perceived organizational justice–CWB relation, providing important insights into the processes through which perceived organizational justice affects CWB.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article

Tova Rosenbloom, Yoav Malka and Shay Israel

The purpose of this paper is to focus on a unique population of airport security guards who work for a specific airline and are frequently sent abroad with short advance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on a unique population of airport security guards who work for a specific airline and are frequently sent abroad with short advance notice. The current study deals with the job burnout of these employees.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 100 airport security guards, employees of a specific airline completed the Attachment Style Questionnaire, the Burnout Questionnaire and Demographic Questions.

Findings

Results indicated that the employees with the preoccupied style suffered more burnout than did those with secure and dismissive-avoidant styles. One of the possible explanations is that people with dismissive-avoidant style enjoy these multiple travels which enable them to be uninvolved with people surrounding them.

Research limitations/implications

This study was based mainly on self-report of both the independent and the dependent variables, with all the disadvantages known to self-report methods.

Practical implications

Points for practitioners are: first, it is recommended to use a selection tool for airport security guards in line with the results of this study; and second, people with avoidance attachment style should potentially be suitable employees for short and multiple travel abroad.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this study contributes a new perspective of the Job Demands-Resources model, that is, the notion that in certain jobs and in specific situations (job demands) insecure attachment style may serve as a job resource rather than as an obstacle.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Deseré Kokt and Relebohile Ramarumo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organisational culture on job stress and burnout in graded accommodation establishments. The demanding nature of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organisational culture on job stress and burnout in graded accommodation establishments. The demanding nature of work in the hospitality industry (e.g. long hours and shift work) renders job stress and burnout, a persisting challenge for the industry. Employees that are constantly subjected to a challenging work environment may experience increased levels of job stress and burnout or even leave the industry entirely. The Free State province of South Africa has a well-established hospitality sector, and this investigation shows the extent to which job stress and burnout are mitigated by a favourable organisational culture.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was administered to 46 graded accommodation establishments in the two main economic clusters (Bloemfontein and Clarens) of the Free State province of South Africa. The investigation was quantitative in nature and the robust competing values framework (CVF) was used as conceptual guide.

Findings

The findings indicate that graded accommodation establishments had a predominantly Rational Culture, which points to strong external positioning and competitiveness. Correlation and regression analyses further confirmed that although the Rational Culture does have a mitigating effect on job stress and burnout, the values associated with the Group Culture and Developmental Culture exert an even stronger mitigating effect.

Practical implications

Managers need to establish a flexible, employee-oriented work environment where employees are allowed to be innovative and entrepreneurial.

Originality/value

The main causes of job stress and burnout in accommodation establishments revolve around the intense customer focus of the industry and the subsequent performance expected from employees.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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