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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Prisca Brosi and Marvin Schuth

Purpose – We aim to elucidate the influence of leaders' emotion expressions on the social distance between leaders and followers in face-to-face and digital communication.…

Abstract

Purpose – We aim to elucidate the influence of leaders' emotion expressions on the social distance between leaders and followers in face-to-face and digital communication.

Design/methodology/approach – Literature review

Findings – Following functional theories on emotions, leaders' expressions of socially engaging emotions (e.g., guilt, happiness, gratitude, and compassion) lower social distance. Leaders' expressions of socially disengaging emotions (e.g., anger, contempt, disgust, and pride) increase social distance. In digital communication, we propose that the effect of socially engaging and disengaging emotions depends on the social presence that is provided by the different digital communication media.

Practical implication – Based on our theoretical model, we derive implications for (1) leaders' use of face-to-face communication, (2) the importance of digital communication with high social presence, (3) leaders' use of digital communication as a tool for emotion regulation, and (4) coping strategies when communicating via digital means with low social presence.

Details

Emotions and Service in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-260-2

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2011

Charmine E.J. Härtel, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Wilfred J. Zerbe

In this overview, the editors trace the history of 10 books they have helmed in what has become the legacy of the Emonet conferences. From the seeds planted in 1998 by a…

Abstract

In this overview, the editors trace the history of 10 books they have helmed in what has become the legacy of the Emonet conferences. From the seeds planted in 1998 by a small group of international scholars assembled together at the first Emonet conference, the shift of the study of emotions in organizational studies from the almost “undiscussable” to mainstream scholarship is traced. Following this historical analysis, the story of “What have we learned? Ten years on,” the latest volume in the Emonet book series, is given. In a brief summary of each chapter in the current edition, the editors draw attention to eight topic areas to showcase the remarkable and broad-ranging advances in the field of organization studies that have been enabled by attention to the role of emotions in theory and practice in 10 years since the first publication in the book series. From advances in our knowledge and understanding of work, workers and consumers, to team behavior, leader-member exchange, and In Extremis work contexts, and methodological contributions in the assessment of noncognitive traits through to advances in knowledge of positive work environments, the reader is left in no doubt that organizational scholarship and practice has been deeply enriched through bringing emotions center stage.

Details

What Have We Learned? Ten Years On
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-208-1

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

María Sicilia, M. Carmen Caro-Jiménez and Estela Fernández-Sabiote

While research evidences how customers’ emotions can influence their consumer experience, understanding of how employees’ displayed emotions affect the customer service…

Abstract

Purpose

While research evidences how customers’ emotions can influence their consumer experience, understanding of how employees’ displayed emotions affect the customer service experience is more limited. Drawing on affect transfer theory, the authors test for the mediating role of attitude towards the employee, which is proposed to mediate the effect of employees’ displayed emotion on customers’ satisfaction with recovery. As service recovery entails a critical service experience in which emotions can easily rise, this paper aims to highlight the pivotal role of employee-displayed emotions during service recovery.

Methodology

A scenario-based experiment in the context of an airline service failure recovery (3 × 2 between-subjects design) manipulates frontline employees’ emotions (anger vs happiness vs no specific emotion) and the quality of the solution (bad vs good).

Findings

Employees’ displayed emotions directly affect attitude towards the employee and indirectly affect service recovery satisfaction. Moreover, attitude towards the employee is affected more by the employee’s displayed emotion when the solution offered is bad compared to good.

Practical implications

Employees’ emotions displayed during service recovery can enhance or damage service recovery strategies. Employees should control for negative emotions in the case of service failure, especially when unable to provide a good solution.

Originality

Emotions displayed by employees can influence the customer’s service recovery evaluations. There is an interesting interaction between the quality of the solution and employees’ displayed emotions. Additionally, the mantra of “service with a smile” may not be valid in the case of service recovery: rather, employees should avoid displaying negative emotions.

Propósito

A pesar de que la literatura ha demostrado la importancia que tienen las emociones en los consumidores, se sabe poco acerca de cómo influyen las emociones de los empleados. Basándonos en la teoría de la transferencia de afecto, testamos el papel mediador de la actitud hacia el empleado. Ésta se propone como mediadora del efecto que tiene la emoción mostrada por el empleado en la satisfacción del cliente. Este trabajo resalta el papel fundamental de las emociones mostradas por el empleado durante la recuperación del servicio.

Metodología

Experimento (3x2 entre sujetos) basado en el fallo de una aerolínea. Se manipulan las emociones del empleado (enfado vs alegría vs ninguna emoción específica) y la calidad de la solución (mala vs buena).

Resultados

Las emociones mostradas por los empleados afectan directamente a la actitud hacia el empleado e indirectamente a la satisfacción con la recuperación del servicio. La actitud se ve más afectada por la emoción mostrada por el empleado cuando la solución ofrecida es mala.

Implicaciones prácticas

Las emociones mostradas por los empleados pueden contribuir o dañar las estrategias de recuperación del servicio. Los empleados deben controlar las emociones negativas, especialmente cuando no pueden ofrecer una buena solución.

Originalidad

Las emociones mostradas por los empleados influyen en la recuperación del servicio. Existe interacción entre la calidad de la solución y la emoción del empleado. Además, la consigna de “atender al cliente con una sonrisa” puede no ser válida en este contexto, siendo más relevante que los empleados no muestren emociones negativas.

目的

虽然研究证明了顾客的情绪如何影响他们的消费体验, 但对员工所表现出的情绪如何影响顾客服务体验的理解却比较有限。借鉴情感转移理论, 我们测试了对员工态度的中介作用, 提出了员工表现出的情绪对客户对服务补救满意度影响的中介作用。由于服务补救涉及情绪容易上升的关键服务体验, 本文强调了员工表现出的情绪在服务补救过程中的关键作用。

方法

在航空公司服务故障补救的背景下, 一个基于场景的实验(3x2主体间设计)操纵了一线员工的情绪(愤怒vs快乐vs无特定情绪)和解决方案的质量(差vs好)。

研究结果

员工表现出来的情绪直接影响顾客对员工的态度, 间接影响对服务补救的满意度。此外, 当所提供的解决方案质量是差的, 而不是好的, 顾客对员工的态度受员工所表现的情绪的影响更大。

实际意义

员工在服务补救过程中表现出来的情绪可以增强或破坏服务补救策略。在服务失败的情况下, 员工应该控制消极的情绪, 特别是在无法提供一个好的解决方案时。

原创性

员工表现出来的情绪会影响顾客的服务补救的评价。解决方案的质量和员工表现的情绪之间存在着有趣的互动。此外, “微笑服务 “的口号在服务补救的情况下可能是无效的:相反, 员工应该避免表现出负面情绪。

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2021

M. Kabir Hassan, Fahmi Ali Hudaefi and Rezzy Eko Caraka

This paper aims to explore netizen’s opinions on cryptocurrency under the lens of emotion theory and lexicon sentiments analysis via machine learning.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore netizen’s opinions on cryptocurrency under the lens of emotion theory and lexicon sentiments analysis via machine learning.

Design/methodology/approach

An automated Web-scrapping via RStudio is performed to collect the data of 15,000 tweets on cryptocurrency. Sentiment lexicon analysis is done via machine learning to evaluate the emotion score of the sample. The types of emotion tested are anger, anticipation, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, surprise, trust and the two primary sentiments, i.e. negative and positive.

Findings

The supervised machine learning discovers a total score of 53,077 sentiments from the sampled 15,000 tweets. This score is from the artificial intelligence evaluation of eight emotions, i.e. anger (2%), anticipation (18%), disgust (1%), fear (3%), joy (15%), sadness (3%), surprise (7%), trust (15%) and the two sentiments, i.e. negative (4%) and positive (33%). The result indicates that the sample primarily contains positive sentiments. This finding is theoretically significant to measure the emotion theory on the sampled tweets that can best explain the social implications of the cryptocurrency phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

This work is limited to evaluate the sampled tweets’ sentiment scores to explain the social implication of cryptocurrency.

Practical implications

The finding is necessary to explain the recent phenomenon of cryptocurrency. The positive sentiment may describe the increase in investment in the decentralised finance market. Meanwhile, the anticipation emotion may illustrate the public’s reaction to the bubble prices of cryptocurrencies.

Social implications

Previous studies find that the social signals, e.g. word-of-mouth, netizens’ opinions, among others, affect the cryptocurrencies’ movement prices. This paper helps explain the social implications of such dynamic of pricing via sentiment analysis.

Originality/value

This study contributes to theoretically explain the implications of the cryptocurrency phenomenon under the emotion theory. Specifically, this study shows how supervised machine learning can measure the emotion theory from data tweets to explain the implications of cryptocurrencies.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Nan (Tina) Wang

One challenge facing the digitalized workplace is communication control, especially emotion regulation in which individuals try to manage their emotional experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

One challenge facing the digitalized workplace is communication control, especially emotion regulation in which individuals try to manage their emotional experiences and/or expressions during organizational communication. Extant research largely focused on the facilitating role of a few media features (e.g. fewer symbol sets). This study seeks to provide a deeper understanding of media features that individuals, as receivers of negative emotions expressed by communication partners, could leverage to support regulating negative emotional communication in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used qualitative research methods to identify media features that support regulating negative emotional communication at work. Data were collected using interviews and was analyzed using directed content analysis in which media features discussed in media synchronicity theory (MST) were used as the initial coding schema but the researcher was open to media features that do not fit with MST.

Findings

In addition to media features (and capabilities) discussed in MST, this study identified five additional media features (i.e. message broadcasting, message blocking, receiving specification, recipient specification and compartmentalization) and two underlying media capabilities (i.e. transmission control capability and participant control capability) that may support regulating negative emotional communication. Two major mechanisms (i.e. reducing or eliminating emotion regulation workload, and providing prerequisites or removing obstacles for emotion regulation) via which media features support emotion regulation were also identified.

Originality/value

This paper provides a more comprehensive understanding regarding communication media features that may support emotion regulation in particular and communication control in general. Findings of this study contribute to several literatures and may also transfer to other similar contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Laurel Aynne Cook, M. Paula Fitzgerald and Raika Sadeghein

One shift in the retail landscape is the workload transfer from the retailer to the consumer. This study aims to explore consumer perceived effort and the consequences of…

Abstract

Purpose

One shift in the retail landscape is the workload transfer from the retailer to the consumer. This study aims to explore consumer perceived effort and the consequences of this workload transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

Two scenario-based experiments were conducted. Partial least squares modeling was implemented on the experimental survey data to explore how different dimensions of effort (i.e. mental, physical and emotional) and surface acting contribute to perceptions of effort and value.

Findings

Surface acting increases consumer effort perceptions. Consumers’ value perceptions decline as perceived effort increases. Effort perceptions attenuate when consumers have a choice. The paper also brings attention to the shortcomings in the current conceptualization of surface acting and perceived effort, and reconceptualizes effort as a formative construct.

Practical implications

This paper cautions marketers about the potential negative implications of shadow work. Service marketers should provide a choice between face-to-face (F2F) and self-service technologies whenever possible. In addition, marketers should develop and implement strategies for reducing consumer surface acting.

Originality/value

This study includes an extended conceptualization and new operationalization of consumer surface acting, revised thinking about measuring consumer effort and a unique approach to accounting for effort perceptions of traditional F2F service vs SST.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Il-Kyoung Kwon and Sang-Yong Lee

The focus in ICT development has shifted from performance to maximization of tangibility. In particular, the interests in emotion-based services increase and more…

Abstract

Purpose

The focus in ICT development has shifted from performance to maximization of tangibility. In particular, the interests in emotion-based services increase and more attention is paid to improving the quality of service and maximizing tangibility. Hence, it is necessary to model human emotions and utilize inferred emotions for services in order to enhance the quality of emotion-based personalized services. To this end, this study aims to model personalized emotional space by means of V-A emotion model and to suggest a fuzzy-based emotion inference method.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes advantage of V-A emotion model, AHP and fuzzy integral technique to implement an emotion inference based on the quantitative evaluation and systematic expression of human emotions. By means of AHP, the personalized V-A emotion model was established. Fuzzy measure and Choquet integral methods were applied for emotion inference based on the inputs of valence and arousal (V-A) values, with the results evaluated in an experiment.

Findings

Thayer's emotion model structures 12 human emotions in reference to V-A values. This structure, however, may differ depending on individuals, and thus a method to measure and express it appropriately is necessary. This study evaluates the relative weight of 12 emotions based on AHP and regularizes them to compose the personalized V-A emotional space by drafting the V-A model. In addition, fuzzy integral-based emotion inference has been tested in reference to the V-A values on the established V-A emotion space.

Originality/value

Fuzzy integral-based emotion inference has been tested in reference to the V-A values on the established personalized emotion space.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Suzanne Hazelton

Highlights the power of positive emotions in helping to build individual and organizational success.

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6241

Abstract

Purpose

Highlights the power of positive emotions in helping to build individual and organizational success.

Design/methodology/approach

Explores the meaning of positive emotions, how they can be promoted at individual and organizational level and the benefits they can bring to the individual and organization.

Findings

Advances the view that positive emotions can benefit physical health, mental well-being and the ability to flourish, creativity, resilience, the mood of others, positive memories and relationships.

Practical implications

Argues that the positive emotions of the workforce can improve the organizational culture and improve organizational performance.

Social implications

Demonstrates that around three positive emotions are needed to balance out each negative emotion and shows that positive emotions can be stimulated through having new experiences and through acts of kindness and gratitude.

Originality/value

Extends psychological thinking on positive emotions to the workforce and workplace.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Alan R. Peslak

To explore the relationships between emotions and overall team processes and task performance.

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4911

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the relationships between emotions and overall team processes and task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The work begins with a literature review of the major studies performed on emotions and their affects on teams. This study then specifically surveys a group of information technology student teams at various stages of a term‐long project to determine their level of feelings in 15 separate emotions at each stage. Also measured are effects of emotions on attitudes towards team processes. Regression analysis was used to measure the significance of several hypotheses.

Findings

Overall findings specifically measured the five hypotheses. It was found that team emotions at the start of the project are more positive than negative. Negative emotions grow more than positive over the life of the project. Emotions show increased intensity over the life of the project. Initial emotions did not significantly affect overall team processes. Final emotions somewhat affected overall team processes.

Research limitations/applications

The small sample size does limit generalizations but the work can serve as a framework for more extensive and industry situated studies.

Practical implications

The work suggests issues related to the impact and evolution of emotions on team projects. Practitioners can begin to focus on efforts that can improve emotions and potentially overall team success.

Originality/value

There is little work done on the evolution of emotions and their effects on team processes. The paper begins the dialogue on an important aspect of team dynamics.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Rahman Ullah

This study aims to examine how and when task and process conflicts relate to relationship conflict by detailing the mediating role of negative emotions and the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how and when task and process conflicts relate to relationship conflict by detailing the mediating role of negative emotions and the moderating effect of emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 462 employees working in different organizations in Pakistan.

Findings

The results revealed that individuals engaged in task and process conflicts are more likely to feel negative emotions toward others and consequently are more likely to engage in relationship conflict in the workplace. This mediated relationship of task and process conflicts with relationship conflict via negative emotions is lower when employees are more emotionally intelligent.

Practical implications

This study pinpointed a key mechanism, negative emotions, by which task and process conflicts lead to relationship conflict. Emotionally intelligent individuals are better at regulating their negative emotions; therefore, emotional intelligence training can be an effective tool for minimizing employees’ negative emotions during task and process conflicts, which can help reduce relationship conflict.

Originality/value

By examining the mediating role of negative emotions and the moderating effect of emotional intelligence, this study adds to the previous research by detailing how and when task and process conflicts lead to relationship conflict.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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