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Perceived job insecurity climate in uncertain times: implications for work-related health among leaders versus non-leaders

Mats Glambek (Department of Leadership and Organizational Behaviour, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway)
Mads Nordmo Arnestad (Department of Leadership and Organizational Behaviour, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway)
Stig Berge Matthiesen (Department of Leadership and Organizational Behaviour, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway)

Journal of Managerial Psychology

ISSN: 0268-3946

Article publication date: 19 September 2023

Issue publication date: 17 October 2023

274

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have demonstrated that perceived job insecurity climate denotes an individual-level stressor. The present study reiterated this notion and investigated whether leadership responsibility moderated the association between perceived job insecurity climate and work-related strain about one year into the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of full-time workers (N = 1,399) in the USA was recruited, comprising 663 leaders and 763 non-leaders. Employing a cross-sectional design, the authors hypothesized that perceived job insecurity climate would be associated with work-related strain (i.e. burnout, absenteeism and presenteeism) and that these associations were stronger for employees with leadership responsibilities compared to non-leaders.

Findings

Findings revealed main effects of perceived job insecurity climate on burnout but not on absenteeism or presenteeism. Furthermore, leadership responsibility moderated the associations between perceived job insecurity climate and two out of three burnout measures in the hypothesized direction. The findings also revealed interaction effects regarding absenteeism and presenteeism, indicating that these associations are only positive and significant for employees with leadership responsibilities.

Practical implications

Perceptions of widespread job insecurity engender strain among leaders while simultaneously implying a heightened need for effective leadership. Organizations and practitioners should take the present findings into consideration when implementing preventive and restorative measures to address leaders' health and organizational competitiveness when job insecurity increases.

Originality/value

This study found that, as an individual stressor, perceived job insecurity climate is more detrimental to employees with leadership responsibility than to non-leaders.

Keywords

Citation

Glambek, M., Arnestad, M.N. and Matthiesen, S.B. (2023), "Perceived job insecurity climate in uncertain times: implications for work-related health among leaders versus non-leaders", Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 38 No. 7, pp. 541-557. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMP-10-2021-0542

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2023, Emerald Publishing Limited

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