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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Hira Rani, Syed Mir Muhammad Shah, Waheed Ali Umrani, Jawad Syed and Gul Afshan

Utilizing affective event theory (AET), this paper aims to understand the affective reasoning behind choosing to speak up for or against abusive supervision. For this…

Abstract

Purpose

Utilizing affective event theory (AET), this paper aims to understand the affective reasoning behind choosing to speak up for or against abusive supervision. For this purpose, the authors examine the underlying mechanism of employee state paranoia in the relationship between abusive supervision and promotive and prohibitive voice of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 307 microfinance bank employees were collected using supervisor–subordinate nested design and time-lag approach. The analysis was performed through partial least square (PLS) structural equation modeling using Smart PLS software.

Findings

The results support the direct relationship of abusive supervision with promotive and prohibitive voice. They also support the mediating relation of paranoia arousal between abusive supervision and promotive voice. However, the results do not support the mediating relationship of paranoia arousal between abusive supervision and prohibitive voice.

Originality/value

In light of the literature drawn from AET and empirical data, this study forwards robust recommendations for theory and practice and may assist future researchers interested in the role of employee paranoia arousal.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Upasna A. Agarwal, James Avey and Keke Wu

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via psychological safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a three-wave time-lagged design and data were collected from 388 full-time employees in India.

Findings

The results show that psychological safety mediated the impact abusive supervision had on knowledge hiding. Further, this impact was weakened by higher self-esteem as employees with higher self-esteem were less affected by the impact of abusive supervision on psychological safety and knowledge hiding; but this impact was amplified by more co-rumination as employees who co-ruminated more were also more affected by abusive supervision in psychological safety and knowledge hiding.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional design and the use of self-reported questionnaires are a few limitations of this study.

Originality/value

This study took a purposeful deviation from the traditional path of organizational justice to the study of abusive supervision and psychological safety and endeavored an alternate route, one of resource conservation. Further, employees have diverse reasons that heighten or dampen their inclination to hide knowledge from others in the workplace. The study examines co-rumination and self-esteem as possible boundary conditions.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Johannes F. W. Arendt, Erica L. Bettac, Josef H. Gammel and John F. Rauthmann

This chapter provides an overview of research on dispositional supervisor characteristics as well as specific individual-level antecedents, correlates, boundary conditions…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of research on dispositional supervisor characteristics as well as specific individual-level antecedents, correlates, boundary conditions and processes of supervisors who display hostile verbal and nonverbal behaviours towards their followers (i.e., abusive supervision). More specifically, empirical research findings on the relationships between specific supervisor characteristics and subordinate-rated perceptions of abusive supervisor behaviours are summarized and critically discussed. To better understand what contributes to abusive supervision, the moderating role of follower characteristics and the greater organizational context are taken into account as well. The chapter closes with an integrated process model of abusive supervision, an outlook and suggestions for future research.

Details

Destructive Leadership and Management Hypocrisy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-180-5

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Arslan Ayub, Tahira Ajmal, Shahid Iqbal, Sidra Ghazanfar, Mahwish Anwaar and Mustafa Ishaq

Despite burgeoning interest in knowledge hiding (KH), there are still significant gaps in the understanding of the boundary conditions under which KH is more or less…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite burgeoning interest in knowledge hiding (KH), there are still significant gaps in the understanding of the boundary conditions under which KH is more or less likely to occur. To address this research gap, the researchers examined abusive supervision as an interpersonal antecedent of KH. In addition, this paper aims to investigate the moderating roles of negative reciprocity beliefs (NRB) and moral disengagement (MD) in the relationship between abusive supervision and KH.

Design/methodology/approach

Two-wave data using a non-experimental face-to-face method was collected from 257 service employees in Pakistan, which supported the hypothesized model. Considering minimum sample size requirements (i.e. n = 208) in partial least squares structural equation modeling, the researchers analyzed a two-stage approach to test the measurement model and the structural model.

Findings

The study found that abusive supervision was positively related to evasive hiding and playing dumb but not associated with rationalized hiding. Further, the results confirm the moderating roles of NRB and MD. The positive relationships between abusive supervision and evasive hiding and playing dumb are intensified at high levels of NRB and MD.

Originality/value

Given the complicated nature of KH, this is one of the few efforts that outstretch the boundary conditions of KH.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Rayees Farooq and Almaas Sultana

The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding. The study also examines the mediating role of distrust in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding. The study also examines the mediating role of distrust in the relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding.

Design/methodology/approach

The procedure used in the study is a systematic literature review covering abusive supervision, knowledge hiding, distrust from 1994 to 2021. The studies were explored using the keyword search such as, “abusive supervision,” “knowledge hiding” and “distrust” from the selected databases including Emerald, ScienceDirect, EbscoHost and Google Scholar.

Findings

The study found that abusive supervision is positively related to knowledge hiding and distrust mediates the relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding. The study also proposes procrastination as one of the dimensions of knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

The study is an attempt to uncover a series of relationships between abusive supervision, knowledge hiding and distrust, which may enhance academic discussion and also offer clarity to the conceptualization of these two fields.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Changyu Wang, Jiaojiao Feng and Xinze Li

Previous research suggests that abusive supervision has a positive effect on subordinates’ behaviors of knowledge hiding. However, the authors argue that this effect…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research suggests that abusive supervision has a positive effect on subordinates’ behaviors of knowledge hiding. However, the authors argue that this effect depends on the level of team abusive supervision differentiation. Drawing on the conservation of resources (COR) theory and social comparison theory, this study tries to explain how the level of team abusive supervision differentiation, in conjunction with individuals' own experiences of abusive supervision, influences the focal subordinate's knowledge hiding from their colleagues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper addresses a sample of 412 employees nested in 73 groups and tests an original model using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results show that abusive supervision would indirectly promote subordinates' knowledge hiding toward coworkers via emotional exhaustion, and team abusive supervision differentiation has a positive moderating effect on the above indirect relationship.

Practical implications

Human resource management (HRM) practices should be used to reduce abusive supervision both at individual and team level and minimize employees' emotional exhaustion, thereby affecting knowledge hiding from coworkers.

Originality/value

Results show that whether a subordinate's experience of abusive supervision leads to knowledge hiding via emotional exhaustion depends on the level of team abusive supervision differentiation. This finding adds to the literature about abusive supervision and knowledge hiding.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

James B. Avey, Upasna Agarwal and Jadvir K. Gill

The purpose of this research was to understand the mediating role of employee positive psychological capital on the negative relationship between abusive supervision and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to understand the mediating role of employee positive psychological capital on the negative relationship between abusive supervision and employee outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design consisted of a multi-wave study with a heterogeneous sample of working adults in the United States. Study variables included the independent variable of abusive supervision, the mediating variable of positive psychological capital and the dependent variables of psychological well-being, job satisfaction and general health.

Findings

Results from 293 working adults in the United States suggest employee positive psychological capital is an explanatory mechanism as a mediator in the relationship between abusive supervision and outcomes. In other words, abusive supervisors reduce employee psychological capital leading to sub-optimal outcomes.

Practical implications

Results of this study suggest several practical implications, however one is primary. In sum, we found the deleterious effects of abusive supervisors occur through positive psychological capital. While it is often difficult to immediately terminate manager employment for abusive supervision, results here suggest firms can use psychological capital interventions to buffer the negative impact of abusive supervisors.

Originality/value

It is well understood that abusive supervision has a negative impact on employees. However, the underlying mechanisms of how and why this occurs is not well understood. While much research has speculated on why this happens prior to this study, few explanatory mechanisms have been subjected to empirical tests.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

I-An Wang, Szu-Yin Lin, Yeong-Shyang Chen and Shou-Tsung Wu

The purpose of the study is to empirically test and explore the influences of abusive supervision on subordinates' job satisfaction and mental health. Specifically, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to empirically test and explore the influences of abusive supervision on subordinates' job satisfaction and mental health. Specifically, the authors focus on the mediation effects of emotional labor and compare the discrepancies between surface acting and deep acting.

Design/methodology/approach

Time-lagged data were obtained from 239 employees in the hospitality industry in Taiwan. The hypothesized model was tested using structural equation modeling with Mplus 7.4.

Findings

Results showed that abusive supervision is not only negatively related to employees' job satisfaction and mental health but also positively associated with employee surface acting and negatively associated with deep acting. For mediating effects, surface acting mediates the relationships between abusive supervision and employee job satisfaction, while deep acting mediates the relationship between abusive supervision and mental health.

Practical implications

Abusive supervision is detrimental; it should be reduced in the workplace. Also, frontline employees can be provided with training programs to improve their deep acting strategies, which lead to better job satisfaction and mental health.

Originality/value

This research is among the first to examine the link between abusive supervision and both employee job satisfaction and mental health in the hospitality industry and extends the authors’ knowledge by demonstrating the mediating effects of surface acting and deep acting.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Pang Kiam Lim, Kian Yeik Koay and Wei Ying Chong

Cyberloafing (employees' non-work-related online activities at work) has become a common workplace problem for many organizations. Research investigating the underlying…

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Abstract

Purpose

Cyberloafing (employees' non-work-related online activities at work) has become a common workplace problem for many organizations. Research investigating the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions under which abusive supervision influences cyberloafing remains largely underdeveloped. Drawing from social exchange theory and conservation of resources theory, we developed a moderated-mediation model in which emotional exhaustion was theorized as a unique mechanism underlining why employees are more likely to engage in cyberloafing under the supervision of abusive leaders. In addition, we proposed that organizational commitment to be a relevant boundary condition to influence such a relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

We collected 255 data from employees working in public listed companies in Malaysia and used partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to analyze the data.

Findings

The results showed that the influence of abusive supervision on cyberloafing through emotional exhaustion is only significant when organizational commitment is low.

Originality/value

This study constructed a moderated-mediation model by introducing the potential mediating effect of emotional exhaustion and the moderating effect of organizational commitment to reveal the mechanism through which abusive supervision related to cyberloafing.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Fizza Rizvi and Akbar Azam

The purpose of this research is to investigate if employees possessing good political skill face less abusive behavior from their supervisors. Moreover, the gender of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate if employees possessing good political skill face less abusive behavior from their supervisors. Moreover, the gender of the subordinate has been tested as a moderator between political skill and abusive supervision. Cultural and social factors prevailing in the research settings of Pakistan provide an ideal situation to test the relationship between political skill and abusive supervision.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 178 employees representing different sectors of Pakistani industry. To test the relationship between political skill and abusive supervision, simple linear regression was run and moderation was tested using PROCESS macro.

Findings

From the analysis, the major findings prove that political skill lessens abusive supervision. Moreover, due to the cultural settings, male subordinates use political skill more proficiently to avoid abusive supervision as compared to female subordinates.

Practical implications

The study suggests that in order to maintain harmony in the work environment, employees must learn political skill to avoid abusive supervision. Moreover, females must be given more chances to utilize their political skill to get positive outcomes.

Originality/value

This study fills up a significant gap in the literature, as there is scarce literature available that investigates the relationship between political skill and abusive supervision, specifically in Pakistan.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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