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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Rebecca Zuege Kuglitsch

This paper aims to describe a new application of Zotero, a citation management system, for embedded librarianship and assessment. It explores student reception of this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a new application of Zotero, a citation management system, for embedded librarianship and assessment. It explores student reception of this approach and maps Zotero’s capacities to represent citations to learning outcomes and information literacy frames that instruction librarians assess.

Design/methodology/approach

The librarian worked with a course using Zotero group libraries for collaborative work, used Zotero to communicate with students and assess their information literacy skills and surveyed the students to determine their perception of librarian participation via Zotero.

Findings

Using Zotero’s features made it possible to formatively and summatively assess student work quickly, and students were receptive to librarian participation via Zotero.

Practical implications

This suggests that librarians facing difficulty embedding in online courses or those seeking to assess student work may wish to explore Zotero as a sustainable solution to both challenges.

Originality/value

This paper posits a solution to common challenges for online embedded librarianship and suggests a new technique for assessing student information literacy in a context that supports information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Peter Fernandez

The purpose of this paper is to highlight how the open‐source bibliographic management program Zotero harnesses Web 2.0 features to make library resources more accessible…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight how the open‐source bibliographic management program Zotero harnesses Web 2.0 features to make library resources more accessible to casual users without sacrificing advanced features. This reduces the barriers understanding library resources and provides additional functionality when organizing information resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews select aspects of the program to illustrate how it can be used by patrons and information professionals, and why information professionals should be aware of it.

Findings

Zotero has some limitations, but succeeds in meeting the information management needs of a wide variety of users, particularly users who use online resources.

Originality/value

This paper is of interest to information professionals seeking free software that can make managing bibliographic information easier for themselves and their patrons.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Raj Kumar Bhardwaj

The purpose of this paper is to compare four popular academic social networking sites (ASNSs), namely, ResearchGate, Academia.edu, Mendeley and Zotero.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare four popular academic social networking sites (ASNSs), namely, ResearchGate, Academia.edu, Mendeley and Zotero.

Design/methodology/approach

Evaluation method has been used with the help of checklist covering various features of ASNSs. A structured checklist has been prepared to compare four popular ASNSs, comprising 198 dichotomous questions divided into 12 broad categories.

Findings

The study found that performance of ASNSs using the latest features and services is not up to the mark, and none of the site is rated as “Excellent”. The sites lack in incorporation of session filters; output features; privacy settings and text display; and search and browsing fields. Availability of bibilographic features and general features is poor in these sites. Further, altmetrics and analytics features are not incorporated properly. User interface of the sites need to improve to draw researchers to use them. The study report reveals that ResearchGate scored the highest, 61.1 per cent points, and was ranked “above average”, followed by Academia.edu with 48.0 per cent and Mendeley with 43.9 per cent are ranked “average”. However, the Zotero (38.9 per cent) was ranked “below average”.

Practical implications

Accreditation agencies can identify suitable sites in the evaluation of institutions’ research output. Further, students and faculty members can choose the site suiting their needs. Library and information science professionals can use the checklist to impart training to the academic community which can help fostering research and development activities.

Originality/value

The study identifies features that ought to be available in a model ASNS. These features are categorized into 12 broad categories. The findings can also be used by developers of the sites to enhance functionalities. Institutions can choose suitable sites while collaborating with other institutions.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Wen-Feng Hsiao, Te-Min Chang and Erwin Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to propose an automatic metadata extraction and retrieval system to extract bibliographical information from digital academic documents in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an automatic metadata extraction and retrieval system to extract bibliographical information from digital academic documents in portable document formats (PDFs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use PDFBox to extract text and font size information, a rule-based method to identify titles, and an Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to extract the titles and authors. Finally, the extracted titles and authors (possibly incorrect or incomplete) are sent as query strings to digital libraries (e.g. ACM, IEEE, CiteSeerX, SDOS, and Google Scholar) to retrieve the rest of metadata.

Findings

Four experiments are conducted to examine the feasibility of the proposed system. The first experiment compares two different HMM models: multi-state model and one state model (the proposed model). The result shows that one state model can have a comparable performance with multi-state model, but is more suitable to deal with real-world unknown states. The second experiment shows that our proposed model (without the aid of online query) can achieve as good performance as other researcher's model on Cora paper header dataset. In the third experiment the paper examines the performance of our system on a small dataset of 43 real PDF research papers. The result shows that our proposed system (with online query) can perform pretty well on bibliographical data extraction and even outperform the free citation management tool Zotero 3.0. Finally, the paper conducts the fourth experiment with a larger dataset of 103 papers to compare our system with Zotero 4.0. The result shows that our system significantly outperforms Zotero 4.0. The feasibility of the proposed model is thus justified.

Research limitations/implications

For academic implication, the system is unique in two folds: first, the system only uses Cora header set for HMM training, without using other tagged datasets or gazetteers resources, which means the system is light and scalable. Second, the system is workable and can be applied to extracting metadata of real-world PDF files. The extracted bibliographical data can then be imported into citation software such as endnote or refworks to increase researchers’ productivity.

Practical implications

For practical implication, the system can outperform the existing tool, Zotero v4.0. This provides practitioners good chances to develop similar products in real applications; though it might require some knowledge about HMM implementation.

Originality/value

The HMM implementation is not novel. What is innovative is that it actually combines two HMM models. The main model is adapted from Freitag and Mccallum (1999) and the authors add word features of the Nymble HMM (Bikel et al, 1997) to it. The system is workable even without manually tagging the datasets before training the model (the authors just use cora dataset to train and test on real-world PDF papers), as this is significantly different from what other works have done so far. The experimental results have shown sufficient evidence about the feasibility of our proposed method in this aspect.

Details

Program, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Jenny Emanuel

As the number of citation management tools including Refworks and EndNote increased in recent years, academic libraries struggle to remain on top of new developments and…

Abstract

Purpose

As the number of citation management tools including Refworks and EndNote increased in recent years, academic libraries struggle to remain on top of new developments and support all of the tools used by their users. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A librarian at the University of Illinois surveyed graduate students and faculty about which tools they use, reasons for tool adoption, features that influence adoption, and support they expect from their library.

Findings

The results highlight that many users still use older tools including EndNote and RefWorks, but do have interests for and reasons to use new tools including Zotero and Mendeley and may not need as much library support as librarians believe.

Originality/value

This is the first research paper on citation management use and can influence what products libraries use and the support they offer.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Karen Markey, Chris Leeder and Soo Young Rieh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of students' library‐research difficulties, especially difficulties rooted in technology, to describe how the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of students' library‐research difficulties, especially difficulties rooted in technology, to describe how the BiblioBouts information literacy game helps students overcome these difficulties, and to discuss how BiblioBouts has evolved in order to reduce students' difficulties with the technology of the library‐research process.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was multi‐modal involving quantitative instruments such as questionnaires and logs of students' game‐play activity and qualitative involving game diaries that students voluntarily completed after time they played the game, focus group interviews with students who played and did not play the game, and personal interviews with instructors before and after their students played the game.

Findings

The technology underlying the library research process is difficult to use. BiblioBouts helps students overcome their difficulties. BiblioBouts continues to evolve to enable students to reduce their difficulties with this technology.

Research limitations/implications

Playing BiblioBouts gives students exposure to searching library databases but game play per se does not focus on searching.

Practical implications

Students benefit from playing BiblioBouts. They gain first‐hand experience and practice with library‐research technologies such as the library portal for database selection, library databases for quality information, and Zotero for citation management. They are exposed to more sources than they would have found on their own and a logical, methodical process for evaluating the sources they find.

Social implications

Online social gaming has been enlisted to transform library research from a solitary activity into a collaborative activity where students document their research activities and share in the research trail that individual game players leave behind.

Originality/value

The research underlines gaming's effectiveness for teaching incoming undergraduate students information literacy skills and concepts.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Nicholas Lonergan

The purpose of this study was to determine faculty preferences and attitudes regarding reference management software (RMS) to improve the library’s support and training programs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine faculty preferences and attitudes regarding reference management software (RMS) to improve the library’s support and training programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A short, online survey was emailed to approximately 272 faculty.

Findings

Survey results indicated that multiple RMS were in use, with faculty preferring Zotero over the library-supported RefWorks. More than 40 per cent did not use any RMS.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively short length of the survey precluded a more detailed investigation of faculty attitudes. The 20 per cent response rate, although typical of surveys of this type, may over-represent those faculty who have strong attitudes toward RMS. These findings support the necessity of doing more research to establish the parameters of the RMS environment among faculty, with implications for support, instruction and outreach at the institutional level.

Practical implications

Surveys should be conducted to establish local faculty RMS usage and preferences, as they may differ from both published findings and local expectations. Because it is unlikely that faculty will overwhelmingly use one RMS, libraries should plan to support multiple RMS.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to investigate the issue of RMS faculty preferences in a liberal arts setting.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

William Marino

The purpose of this paper is to explore a general set of criteria that can be used by librarians and information professionals for the evaluation of citation management tools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a general set of criteria that can be used by librarians and information professionals for the evaluation of citation management tools.

Design/methodology/approach

Collection development practices found in the library world are combined with software selection criteria from the corporate sector and applied to the citation management environment. A discussion of these practices identifies general criteria, or best practices, that can be used in the evaluation of various types of citation management tools.

Findings

Eight criteria are discussed. Key questions are raised that can assist librarians and information professionals in the evaluation process. Additional resources that may assist with evaluation efforts are highlighted, where applicable.

Originality/value

Existing attempts to evaluate citation management tools have employed an approach centering on the features and functionality of a limited set of tools. While effective, these studies neglect new developments in the citation management environment, run the risk of missing other criteria that may be important to both users and libraries, and have short life‐cycles due to the mutable nature of software updates. This study explores the larger environment in which these tools operate, and develops a macro‐assessment of the field, not tied to update schedules or specific software options.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

H. Stephen McMinn

This study aims to review the current level of service and support provided for the bibliographic management applications, EndNote and RefWorks providing research…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to review the current level of service and support provided for the bibliographic management applications, EndNote and RefWorks providing research libraries with a baseline for benchmarking their support of these tools.

Design/methodology/approach

The 111 web sites of the Association for Research Libraries (ARL) academic libraries were systematically reviewed in 2009 for any information provided on the support for bibliographic management applications. This information was recorded and examined by type of library, US publicly supported college or university, US private college or university, or Canadian college or university.

Findings

The majority of ARL libraries provide support for one or more of these applications with the largest percentage, 42 percent, providing support for both applications. The US privately supported colleges and universities were more likely to have licensed an application and to provide support for both applications. A large percentage of libraries provide instruction on the supported application and instructional materials. The libraries supporting RefWorks were more likely to use the instructional materials provided by RefWorks where more libraries produced supporting materials for EndNote in‐house.

Practical implications

Examples of extemporary libraries supporting EndNote, RefWorks and both applications are provided along with other information to aid in the design and or development of support for bibliographic management applications.

Originality/value

This is the first large academic library study examining the overall support provided for these important and widely supported applications designed to work with library resources to aid in the research process.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Betânia Mafra Kaizer, Carlos Eduardo Sanches Silva, Anderson Paulo de Pavia and Thaís Zerbini

The main purpose of this work is a bibliometric and descriptive review of the literature on instruction planning of training offered in the e-learning modality in work…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this work is a bibliometric and descriptive review of the literature on instruction planning of training offered in the e-learning modality in work corporations to identify methodologies and experiences that will serve as a model for professionals working in planning e-learning training in the corporate context.

Design/methodology/approach

The timeline from 2010 to 2020 was adopted. Data were extracted from five databases and were compiled in the software Zotero. Based on defined criteria, 260 productions were identified. The interrelation and metric presentation of the data from these studies were done in the software VosViewer. Subsequently, were selected only free access papers, resulting in 64 publications. From these, we chose 6 empirical studies for a descriptive analysis based on specific criteria.

Findings

The range of hardware and software platforms has stimulated the use of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) and artificial intelligence (AI) resources in corporative training. The use of management tools, such as Voice of Customer (VOC) and Quality Function Deployment (QFD), can support those responsible for instructional planning. The literature presented important elements that should be considered for the proper planning of an e-Learning training: learner: feedback, control of self-learning process, classification of cultural profiles in the case of courses in which participants are geographically distant and training management: content and delivery mode of instruction.

Originality/value

We selected 6 empirical studies that presented models, systems or experiences on training planning to support decisions in this area. This article contributes to the area of T&D showing an updated context of practices for the implementation of training systems that have been adopted in several countries. We present quantitative indicators of scientific production using two additional software to support the bibliometric review: Zotero and VosViewer. This article used five databases and a research equation to systematically present the current panorama of research on training planning from the perspective of the areas of management and organizational psychology.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

1 – 10 of 173