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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Roha Mariam Kaipa

Multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and essays and short answer questions are the most common assessment protocols instructors use in their classrooms. However, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and essays and short answer questions are the most common assessment protocols instructors use in their classrooms. However, the reliability and validity of these assessment protocols are controversial. The current study employed a survey research design using Qualtrics to determine the faculty and student perspective on using MCQs and essay and short answer questions in their courses as well as their rationale for the preference.

Design/methodology/approach

Eighty-five students and 67 faculty within the social sciences discipline participated in the study.

Findings

65% of the students strongly preferred MCQs over essays and short answer questions. However, faculty did not show a strong preference for one or the other form of assessment (52.30% selected essays and short answer questions, and 47.69% preferred MCQs) in their courses. The study also explores why the students and faculty prefer one form of assessment over the other.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study helped to understand the current assessment practices in a classroom from a faculty and student perspective.

Originality/value

This is one of few studies that evaluated the faculty as well as student perspective on the use of MCQs and essays and short answer questions in the curriculum across the social science discipline.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Shanna Coles, Florence Martin, Drew Polly and Chuang Wang

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into institutions of higher education (IHE) on how to support faculty in the integration of digital technologies. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into institutions of higher education (IHE) on how to support faculty in the integration of digital technologies. The research explores faculty interest in types of digital technology information and training, and the types of support faculty are likely to participate in related to digital technology integration. The association of demographic factors of primary teaching method, and experience teaching online or hybrid is provided.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 247 faculty from 53 institutions in the USA completed an online survey related to information, training and support for digital technology integration. The analysis included exploring the descriptive ratings overall and by demographic variable and conducting the one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) with reported effect sizes and Scheffe post-hoc tests.

Findings

From a list of digital technologies that included the LMS, Collaboration Tools (social media and online meeting tools), Audio-Visual Tools (video creation and podcasts), and Technology Trends (mobile learning, games and adaptive learning), faculty ranked LMS highest in interest for training and information. Faculty who have taught hybrid are most interested in collaboration tools and trend tools. For support type, faculty ranked web resources slightly higher than other types of support.

Practical implications

IHE units involved in faculty development can use the findings to plan faculty support initiatives for future institutional needs.

Originality/value

This paper gathers insight from faculty on their preferences for information, training, and support for integrating digital technologies.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

C. Brian Flynn, Hubert S. Feild and Arthur G. Bedeian

The purpose of this paper is to first identify the work‐ and non‐work‐related criteria US‐based management doctoral students consider important in selecting an initial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first identify the work‐ and non‐work‐related criteria US‐based management doctoral students consider important in selecting an initial academic appointment, and second, to explore whether gender and race/ethnicity are associated with the importance attached to these criteria.

Design/methodology/approach

To address these objectives, the authors developed a 125‐item survey of work‐ and non‐work‐related criteria that management PhD students about to enter the academic labor market for the first time may wish to consider in weighing prospective job opportunities.

Findings

Job and professional considerations were dominant in assessing an initial employment opportunity. Female doctoral students differed from their male counterparts in attaching greater importance to four major themes: family friendliness, research support, clarity of performance and reward criteria, and university and community diversity. Race/ethnicity differences were also found, with Asian doctoral students valuing considerations related to academic prestige and research support more than their White counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

Respondents indicated their race/ethnicity, but not their nationality, or whether they were immigrants or US citizens and, thus, may have confounded the results to some degree.

Practical implications

The authors' results carry important implications for departmental administrators seeking to fill open positions with first‐time faculty candidates, as well as management PhD students interested in whether a department can meet their expectations regarding academic and financial resources necessary for academic success.

Originality/value

In that detailed information about what PhD students in general and management doctoral students in particular want in an initial academic appointment is limited, the paper fills a longstanding gap in the research literature.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Lindsey Reno

While library acquisition models are moving steadily away from ownership to access only, film vendors are following suit, but some streaming video purchase models become…

Abstract

While library acquisition models are moving steadily away from ownership to access only, film vendors are following suit, but some streaming video purchase models become so expensive over time that one questions the motivation behind this choice. The following study was done to explore the motivations behind this choice, through a survey of academic librarians. The results showed that academic librarians are purchasing or subscribing to something that they perceive to be the preferred format for faculty and students. At the same time, respondents acknowledge the problems with streaming video purchase models, but this choice is being made despite attitudes that streaming video purchasing models are unsustainable.

Details

Technical Services in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-829-3

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Jo Henry

The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast four academic liaison programs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast four academic liaison programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Areas addressed include liaison subject specialization, communication methods, duties, and program evaluation.

Findings

This paper found similarities in areas of orientation meetings, library guides, and information literacy classes. Unique concepts among the four libraries studied include physical classroom embedment, use of specialized class web pages, faculty literacy classes, and concentrated faculty information literacy assistance.

Originality/value

The results presented provide insight into current academic library liaison practices and the faculty‐liaison relationship.

Details

Library Review, vol. 61 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

H.R. Sujatha and H. Shivananda Murthy

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of electronic information sources (EIS) and the need for end‐user training in the Fisheries Sciences institutions of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of electronic information sources (EIS) and the need for end‐user training in the Fisheries Sciences institutions of South India.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper was conducted using a questionnaire‐based survey method along with the observations and informal interviews among the users of the seven Fisheries Sciences institutions of South India. The response rate received was 79 per cent. The sample respondents chosen for the study consists of 183 teachers/scientists, 71 research scholars and 81 postgraduate students. The data collected were tabulated and analyzed by using SPSS statistical software. The analysis of data covers the computer literacy level, use of different electronic sources, and frequency of its use, and the areas of training needed by the users of Fisheries Sciences institutions.

Findings

It is observed that the respondent's perceived ability to use the computer is quite high and that there is significant use of EIS mainly for research purposes. Though the majority felt that their level of computer literacy was average or above average, they expressed a need for training in the use of the EIS. The respondents preferred workshops, hands‐on training, on‐screen presentations and the need‐based support to self‐help guides/hand‐outs and training by central/state government.

Originality/value

The findings of the paper have provided useful insights for the library management to take appropriate steps and plan strategies in a systematic manner so as to enable the users to achieve a higher skill which in turn would facilitate the better provision and utilization of the EIS. The paper can also be of use for other subject areas.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Nicholas Lonergan

The purpose of this study was to determine faculty preferences and attitudes regarding reference management software (RMS) to improve the library’s support and training programs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine faculty preferences and attitudes regarding reference management software (RMS) to improve the library’s support and training programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A short, online survey was emailed to approximately 272 faculty.

Findings

Survey results indicated that multiple RMS were in use, with faculty preferring Zotero over the library-supported RefWorks. More than 40 per cent did not use any RMS.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively short length of the survey precluded a more detailed investigation of faculty attitudes. The 20 per cent response rate, although typical of surveys of this type, may over-represent those faculty who have strong attitudes toward RMS. These findings support the necessity of doing more research to establish the parameters of the RMS environment among faculty, with implications for support, instruction and outreach at the institutional level.

Practical implications

Surveys should be conducted to establish local faculty RMS usage and preferences, as they may differ from both published findings and local expectations. Because it is unlikely that faculty will overwhelmingly use one RMS, libraries should plan to support multiple RMS.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to investigate the issue of RMS faculty preferences in a liberal arts setting.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Xiangmin Liu and Liang Zhang

This study investigates the relationship among preference for full-time employment, primacy of part-time employment, and work-related outcomes in a nationally…

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship among preference for full-time employment, primacy of part-time employment, and work-related outcomes in a nationally representative sample of part-time college instructors. Results based on multilevel cross-classified random effects models indicate that part-time faculty who prefer full-time positions report working on average more hours per week and express greater work-related dissatisfaction than those who choose reduced work hours. Individuals whose part-time jobs are their primary jobs have less job satisfaction but work longer hours than those who treat part-time work as secondary. Finally, those who prefer full-time employment report more negative job satisfaction when the primacy of their part-time jobs is high.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-380-4

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Rami M. Ayoubi and Bayan Ustwani

The main purpose of this paper is to find whether a correlation exists between students’ natural preferences or what is known as psychological type as determined by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to find whether a correlation exists between students’ natural preferences or what is known as psychological type as determined by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI); the extent of their enthusiasm measured by their level of “like” to the subject, and students’ grade point average (GPA).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 89 students who took the MBTI inventory in five selected faculties at Damascus University in Syria. In order to rate the subjects’ like or dislike level, the students were asked to complete a form prepared for this purpose. The students’ GPAs were also included in the analysis.

Findings

Using paired sample t-test, the results indicate a statistically significant correlation between type of student and his/her faculty of study, type of student and overall study subject like, and type of student and his/her GPA. There was, however, a statistically significant correlation between various personality dichotomies of the type (Extraversion-Introversion, Sensing-Intuition, Thinking-Feeling, Judging-Perceiving) and faculty, individual subjects like, and GPA. The study also indicates a statistically significant correlation between study like and GPA, and faculty and GPA. The most critical conclusion from the study is that Sensing-Intuition dichotomy of the MBTI inventory has the strongest correlation to distribution of students among faculties, the subject's like or dislike, and the GPA. In addition, the higher the level of like for a subject, the higher the GPA is.

Research limitations/implications

The study results were based on a sample of students from a specific subject area of study. To validate the results of the study, future research is highly needed on a larger sample of students from different subject disciplines.

Practical implications

Empirically, this study provides decision makers of the higher education sector with relevant information regarding the intended future attempts to reform the university admission policy with regards to the career path.

Originality/value

The usefulness of MBTI inventory has not been assessed in the Arab countries before. This study is therefore considered as one of the initial studies in this field.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Stella Korobili and Irene Tilikidou

To provide reliable data for the development of efficient information literacy education in a department of a higher educational institute in Thessaloniki, Greece. It…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide reliable data for the development of efficient information literacy education in a department of a higher educational institute in Thessaloniki, Greece. It requires in‐depth understanding of the current situation as well as future expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research objectives were set. One was to record the use of resources by students and their perceptions, as well as the expectations of faculty regarding information literacy skills. The other was to examine the preferences of students and faculty regarding information literacy education. Two surveys were conducted among both students (cluster sampling) and faculty (census) by the utilization of relative structured questionnaire.

Findings

The project reveals that the percentage of students who use the e‐resources of the library is relatively low, and that the few students who attended the bibliographic instruction seminar use the e‐resources more for the completion of their assignments. Also faculty were found to do very little in class to motivate students to use library sources for completing long research papers. With reference to students' and faculty's preferences concerning future information literacy education, it was indicated that the greatest percentage prefer instruction at user's request, and a course integrated into the curriculum. Focusing on a course integrated in the curriculum, it is suggested that it is provided at the first or second semester of their studies, to be developed on the basis of librarian/faculty cooperation and supported by demonstration of resources and/or hands‐on workshops.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to fill the gaps left in understanding faculty attitudes toward information literacy. Also duplicating this survey in other departments of Technological Educational Institution could provide a picture of the kind of information literacy education a Greek institution should apply.

Practical implications

This research implies the need for developing a course integrated into the curriculum tailored to the interests of the students, designed to develop critical thinking skills. It is suggested that this course should be provided at an appropriate time that would allow students to acknowledge its relevance to course content. A multimedia product is suggested as a handbook to this course.

Originality/value

This research tries to fill a gap in the published literature which does not offer any surveys in Greek academic institutions about perceptions and practices of faculty and students regarding information literacy programs.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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