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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Patrick Mapulanga

The purpose of this paper is to look at adequacy or inadequacy of budgets for University of Malawi Libraries (UML) from financial years 2004 to 2009.

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535

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at adequacy or inadequacy of budgets for University of Malawi Libraries (UML) from financial years 2004 to 2009.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design was used to collect quantitative data. University budget estimate from 2003/2004 to 2009/2010 financial years were used.

Findings

The results of the study show that of five constituent colleges of the University of Malawi, four (80 per cent) of their college libraries are inadequately funded below 6 per cent. The average funding as a percentage of the total college funding for the five UML in the six‐year financial period from 2004 to 2010 are as follows: Bunda College Library 2.7 per cent; Chancellor College Library 3.72 per cent; College of Medicine Library 3.52 per cent; Kamuzu College of Nursing Library 6.27 per cent; and the Polytechnic Library 3.43 per cent. Only Kamuzu College of Nursing Library received a minimum average of 6 per cent of the total college funding.

Practical implications

The study recommends that college librarians should lobby for increased budgets for UML. College librarians should also consider income‐generating activities as a means to supplement funding through government subvention.

Originality/value

There is very little researched information on inadequacy or adequacy of budgeting and funding on UML. This research adds some information on UML budgeting and financing.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

MARGARET WAITERS

In 1946 the Fyfe Report on Technical Education first recognised the need for libraries in Further Education colleges in Scotland, and suggested certain specifications for…

Abstract

In 1946 the Fyfe Report on Technical Education first recognised the need for libraries in Further Education colleges in Scotland, and suggested certain specifications for this type of library. Two later reports, on Technical Education in 1956 and on Libraries in Technical Colleges in 1957, progressed from the Fyfe Report and laid down recommendations and guidelines concerning the provision of library services in technical colleges. Since that time, there have been other reports and publications concerning the standards to be followed by these libraries. By the end of the 1960s it was accepted that Further Education colleges should provide a library and should appoint a qualified librarian to administer that library.

Details

Library Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Deborah Goodall

Academic franchising has provided opportunities for many thousands of students who would otherwise have been excluded from higher education. Yet, despite the continued…

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855

Abstract

Academic franchising has provided opportunities for many thousands of students who would otherwise have been excluded from higher education. Yet, despite the continued presence of franchised courses, the approach has been, as far as possible, to make them fit in alongside traditional courses. Reports some of the work carried out by CERLIM at the University of Central Lancashire during the two‐year Library Support for Franchised Courses in Higher Education project, which was part‐funded by the British Library. Notes the differences in provision between college and university libraries and examines the student experience within this context. Identifies weakness in provision and describes the students’ coping strategies. Presents the practical implications of this work as suggestions to library managers for improving practice in the college and university libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Deborah Goodall

Assesses library support for courses franchised from universities tofurther education colleges. The research formed part of a two‐yearBritish Library‐funded project…

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415

Abstract

Assesses library support for courses franchised from universities to further education colleges. The research formed part of a two‐year British Library‐funded project examining library support for franchised courses in higher education. Interviews were held with 17 college librarians in Lancashire and Cumbria to explore the extent to which they are involved with franchised courses and the impact that such courses had on the college libraries. The discussions examined the library′s participation in the validation process and identified areas of dissatisfaction with the franchising process as well as difficulties with, for example, the provision of appropriate information skills work. Considers the impact of franchising in real terms in relation to book and journal stocks and support services, and comments on the perceived role of the franchising university′s library.

Details

Library Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Mary Barbosa-Jerez, Kasia Gonnerman, Benjamin Gottfried and Jason Paul

The purpose of this case study is to demonstrate how a liberal arts college library has reimagined its spaces in response to the changes in higher education, particularly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to demonstrate how a liberal arts college library has reimagined its spaces in response to the changes in higher education, particularly integration of educational technology into research, teaching, and learning; changes in students’ information-seeking behaviors; and an increasingly important role of local special collections as a means to preserve and reinforce unique institutional identity.

Methodology/approach

This case study is built on the first-hand experience, as all contributors directly participated in each phase of the process, from formulating ideas to completion of the current stage.

Findings

Meaningful and high-impact space adjustments do not necessarily entail extensive budgetary investments. They do entail, however, developing comprehensive goals and directions and a level of collaboration among library departments and relevant academic units in order to deliver cohesive services, programming, and a creative, nimble response to the constantly changing needs of the patron.

Practical implications

We believe that these high-impact, cost-conscious improvements provide a useful model for other small academic libraries preparing to reconfigure or renovate their spaces. We offer a model for creating a dynamic, service-centered space on a limited budget.

Originality/value

The overwhelming majority of the literature related to library spaces focuses on large universities, and the treatment of space topics in small undergraduate colleges, and liberal arts colleges in particular, is strikingly negligent. This case study of a small liberal arts college will help fill the void by adding to the rare voices commenting on library spaces in liberal arts colleges.

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anna Marie Johnson, Amber Willenborg, Christopher Heckman, Joshua Whitacre, Latisha Reynolds, Elizabeth Alison Sterner, Lindsay Harmon, Syann Lunsford and Sarah Drerup

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications…

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4915

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2017 in over 200 journals, magazines, books and other sources.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description for all 590 sources.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

A. Miller

The purpose of this case study is to illustrate how a university library collaborated with a specific college to preserve scholarship with a sustainable approach. The…

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1538

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to illustrate how a university library collaborated with a specific college to preserve scholarship with a sustainable approach. The practical process described is recommended for increasing content submissions in a newly established institutional repository. Of the eight colleges at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), the Honors College was selected as a case study for a librarycollege collaboration on content curation for the institutional repository that is maintained by MTSU’s Walker Library.

Design/methodology/approach

Concept of shared and divided responsibilities for the upload, maintenance and sustainability of institutional repository submissions based on a particular case study and aided with literature on data management, digital publishing, library publishing and preservation research.

Findings

The partner approach, the sharing and division of responsibilities, is instrumental to the growth and sustainability of a library publishing program and for the preservation of university scholarship.

Practical implications

The (college) partner approach not only educates campus units about a new resource (e.g. institutional repository), but also encourages campus units to rethink other current and outdated practices that need to adapt to technological changes that support the unit and its students. This approach will help the library with campus outreach after an institutional repository is implemented and offers guidance on a collaborative approach to repository submission growth.

Originality/value

This paper suggests a (college) partner approach that mutually benefits the College and its students, departments and the library that maintains the institutional repository on behalf of the university. During the implementation process of this case study, an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)/accessibility compliance issue of repository items surfaced and allowed for a new course of action to be taken campus wide which adds to the originality of this case study.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Lynne Porat and Snunith Shoham

The recent establishment of academic colleges in Israel not only has affected the make‐up of Israeli higher education, it also has affected university libraries

Abstract

The recent establishment of academic colleges in Israel not only has affected the make‐up of Israeli higher education, it also has affected university libraries, particularly the interlibrary loan (ILL) departments. This article describes a study that characterised the ILL borrowing practices of Israeli college libraries in general and, in particular, those of libraries that send the majority of their requests to universities. It also identified the disciplines of college library ILL requests and determined that there is a connection to the disciplines prevalent in their own collections. In addition, it identified the Israeli university libraries that received increased requests between 1997 and 2001, assessed the effects on them and identified changes implemented in interlibrary loan departments in order to deal with the increased demand.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Zahid Ashraf Wani and Ansaar Hussain Ganaie

This paper aims to highlight the damage suffered by the prominent libraries of Kashmir during September 2014 floods. The work provide an insight about the response and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the damage suffered by the prominent libraries of Kashmir during September 2014 floods. The work provide an insight about the response and recovery measures being taken during and after the floods respectively in ten prominent libraries of Jammu & Kashmir [six Academic libraries (S.P. College Library, Women’s College Library, Govt. Degree College Library – Bemina, Amar Singh College Library, Gandhi Memorial College Library and College of Education Library); three Special libraries (J&K Academy of Art, Culture & Languages Library – Srinagar, Govt. Medical College Library – Srinagar and J&K High Court Library) and one Public library (Sri Pratap Singh library)].

Design/methodology/approach

A variety of data collection tools and techniques such as interview, questionnaire, observation, etc., were used to collect the data. The collected data have been tabulated and analyzed to derive meaningful conclusions and findings as per the set objectives of the study.

Findings

The results reveal that although libraries in Kashmir are prone to disasters like floods; yet, none of the library seems to be prepared to bear or cope such a disaster. The findings provide a gloomy picture of libraries when it comes to the measures being taken by these libraries during and after the floods to protect their resources. The paper highlights the inefficiency and incapability of libraries (in terms of disaster management) by finding that most of the libraries are without a disaster response and recovery plan as well as a disaster response and recovery team. The study recommends that some tangible measures if taken can save precious resources hosted in libraries.

Practical implications

The current study can help the stakeholders to chalk out scientific and systematic policy and plans for library and information centers that can be executed with minimum of fuss and anarchy.

Originality/value

The study offers working knowledge to library professional on ground for effective management of assets and resources in pre- and post-disaster scenario.

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Robert Detmering, Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Samantha McClellan and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all…

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4848

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

It introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2014.

Findings

It provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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