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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Christy Groves

A large, predominantly undergraduate university in Tennessee partnered with a local magnet school aiming to assist high school seniors with their college-level research…

Abstract

Purpose

A large, predominantly undergraduate university in Tennessee partnered with a local magnet school aiming to assist high school seniors with their college-level research assignment. The partnership began as a pilot, but quickly expanded to include other high schools as a result of initial successes. This paper aims to describe the development of the partnership and its importance in fulfilling a key component of college preparedness for gifted high school students.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes how the Library partnership commenced as a service to a local high school that required its students to access college-level research materials. The paper details how both the Library and the high school recognized the impact of collaborating to expose these students to the information literacy skills needed for college readiness.

Findings

The paper presents the challenges encountered when attempting to provide college-level information literacy instruction to large groups of students visiting a college campus. It concludes with best practices and lessons learned, as well as plans for formal assessment and future initiatives.

Originality/value

The author has presented at Library Instruction West, July 2018. A review of the professional literature demonstrates that other academic libraries have partnered with local schools for a variety of library-related initiatives. Therefore, the concept of partnerships between the Library and local high schools is not unique. However, this paper aims to describe challenges encountered, best practices, lessons learned and suggestions for future directions, including formal assessment, all of which could be adapted by other academic libraries as applicable.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Jody Nelson, Joan Morrison and Lindsey Whitson

This paper aims to describe the MacEwan University Library’s successful pilot of a fully blended information literacy (IL) instruction program for first-year English…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the MacEwan University Library’s successful pilot of a fully blended information literacy (IL) instruction program for first-year English courses. Development, implementation and assessment of the pilot prior to full implementation are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The new sustainable blended model for the English Library Instruction Program reduced duplication of content and effort, incorporated online and in-person instruction and promoted self-directed learning opportunities through a new Learning Commons. This model places essential instruction online while maintaining personal relationships for students with the English Librarian and the Library through multiple points of interaction. Face-to-face instruction efforts were concentrated on developing critical thinking skills through a hands-on source evaluation activity and on providing point-of-need support. Librarians worked closely with English faculty to encourage early voluntary adoption of the new model for the Fall 2013 pilot.

Findings

The voluntary early-adopter model worked well for garnering and maintaining support from the English department: the authors had 42 per cent of English sessions piloting the new model for Fall 2013, surpassing the initial target of 25 per cent. Students scored well on an assessment of their ability to identify scholarly sources. Librarian preparation time has been greatly reduced.

Originality/value

Many academic libraries are looking to asynchronous online tutorials as a more sustainable model for delivering IL instruction. This case study demonstrates that it is possible to move some instruction online while maintaining the personal relationships librarians have forged with students and faculty.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Melissa Beuoy and Katherine Boss

The purpose of this paper was to develop a rubric based on the ACRL framework to analyze departmental syllabi for opportunities to scaffold information literacy instruction

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to develop a rubric based on the ACRL framework to analyze departmental syllabi for opportunities to scaffold information literacy instruction. The rubric provided a replicable method of gathering and analyzing data using course syllabi to enable instruction librarians to strategically embed information literacy instruction within a disciplinary curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined 231 syllabi from three departments at a large American university. The authors developed and normed a rubric based on ACRL’s 2015 Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and coded the syllabi for the presence of these six themes using a three-indicator scale: not present, implied or explicitly stated. Cohen’s kappa calculations for interrater reliability was 0.92, which indicates that the raters had a high level of agreement and that the rubric could be a reliable instrument to replicate this sort of study.

Findings

The analysis revealed numerous opportunities for targeted, curriculum-integrated instruction in each department at the undergraduate and graduate levels. It also offered disciplinary insights on the Framework within and across each program. Thesedata can be used to inform conversations with program administrators about scaffolding information literacy interventions across a curriculum.

Originality/value

This study contributes a new instrument with which to analyze syllabi for information literacy outcomes to develop curricular maps and conduct strategic instructional outreach. The data demonstrated that the rubric is reliable and could be used to replicate this study in a variety of programs or institutions. Authors have presented at Library Instruction West, July 2018.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Joan Petit and Sara Thompson

Abstract

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Meghan Wanucha Smith

This paper describes the development of a culture of assessment in an academic library’s information literacy program offered through its Research and Instructional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the development of a culture of assessment in an academic library’s information literacy program offered through its Research and Instructional Services department.

Design/methodology/approach

Incorporating components from change management, adult learning and organizational authority approaches offers opportunities for those without managerial duties to encourage others to incorporate student learning assessment into their work. Over a three-year period, instruction assessment was refreshed and renewed in an information literacy program and individual sessions through workshops, new assessment techniques and reflective activities.

Findings

Approaching cultural change through small, incremental activities can be a useful method for encouraging buy-in and engagement from library workers. Efforts at one academic library resulted in increased rates of assessment in instruction sessions and self-reported willingness to use assessment techniques in the future.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to the analysis and building of an assessment culture within a single academic library department.

Originality/value

Changing organizational culture is a complex undertaking, particularly for those without supervisory duties. This paper applies approaches of change leadership and assessment from existing literature to an instruction program through the lens of “coordinator syndrome.” Librarians from institutions where assessment is dispersed throughout an organization or where assessment has been seen in a negative light may find a similar incremental approach useful in their own context.

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Krista M. Reynolds, Lindsay Michelle Roberts and Janet Hauck

This paper aims to provide an overview of Keller’s ARCS (attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction) model of motivational design and explores how three instruction

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of Keller’s ARCS (attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction) model of motivational design and explores how three instruction librarians at different institutions have integrated the model into their teaching practices to improve student motivation during information literacy (IL) sessions.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies describe how instruction librarians began to incorporate the ARCS model into library instruction. Three librarians used self-reflective practice and a range of assessment techniques to evaluate and improve teaching practice.

Findings

ARCS is valuable for improving student engagement during IL instruction. The authors suggest best practices for learning about and integrating the model and propose instructional strategies that align with it.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in literature on practical applications of motivational design in library instruction and suggests best practices for teaching and assessment using the ARCS model.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Tessa Withorn, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Jillian Eslami, Anthony Andora, Maggie Clarke, Nicole Patch, Karla Salinas Guajardo and Syann Lunsford

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2018.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 422 sources, and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and anyone interested as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Julia A. Glassman and Douglas M. Worsham

This paper aims to outline the ongoing development, implementation and evaluation of a digital research notebook designed to support hybrid and online approaches to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the ongoing development, implementation and evaluation of a digital research notebook designed to support hybrid and online approaches to information literacy development in one-shot, course-integrated and full course instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the authors’ collaborative creation of the research notebook and its evolution from a collection of online modules to a student-centered online learning tool focused on supporting the reflective research and writing process. A small random sampling of notebooks was used for assessment of student learning and the notebook’s effectiveness.

Findings

Hybrid approaches to library instruction that leverage direct assessment of student work as well as opportunities for students to reflect on their research process facilitate both student learning and increased understanding for library staff of how students experience the research and writing process.

Practical implications

The development of instructional tools to extend the “one-shot” model can lead to a variety of instructional innovations and open up opportunities to explore and develop new approaches. Including opportunities for students to reflect and provide feedback on their experience of the research and writing process offers important insights often missed by purely quantitative assessment methods.

Social implications

Use of the research notebook opened up more time during face to face instruction time for deeper learning, critical information literacy and discussions of social justice issues related to information production and access.

Originality/value

The paper presents an innovative, adaptable and scalable approach to addressing common challenges faced by information literacy instruction programs.

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Richard Hayman and Erika E Smith

The purpose of this article is to discuss approaches to sustainable decision-making for integrating emerging educational technologies in library instruction while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to discuss approaches to sustainable decision-making for integrating emerging educational technologies in library instruction while supporting evidence-based practice (EBP).

Design/methodology/approach

This article highlights recent trends in emerging educational technologies and EBP and details a model for supporting evidence informed decision-making. This viewpoint article draws on an analysis of recent literature, as well as experience from professional practice.

Findings

Authors discuss the need for sustainable decision-making that addresses a perceived lack of evidence surrounding emerging technologies, a dilemma that many library educators and practitioner-researchers will have faced in their own library instruction. To support the evidence-informed selection and integration of emerging educational technologies, a two-pronged model is presented, beginning with an articulation of pedagogical aims, alignment of technological affordances to these aims and support of this alignment via hard evidence available in the research literature, as well as soft evidence found in the environmental scan.

Originality/value

This article provides an outline and synthesis of key issues of relevance to library practitioners working within a challenging and ever-changing landscape of technologies available for learning and instruction. The proposed approach aims to create a sustainable model for addressing problems of evidence and will benefit academic librarians considering emerging educational technologies in their own pedagogy, as well as those who support the pedagogy of others.

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Kevin Patrick Seeber

This paper aims to present academic librarians with a framework for teaching and assessing information literacy in response to advancements in online discovery…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present academic librarians with a framework for teaching and assessing information literacy in response to advancements in online discovery. Advancements in online discovery require academic librarians to develop new means of teaching and assessing information literacy, with an emphasis on having students use critical thinking to evaluate sources.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper analyzes how the threshold concept “format as a process” could be incorporated into information literacy instruction sessions which address Web-scale discovery services and other online search tools. General guidelines for applying this concept are included, along with potential classroom activities and assessments.

Findings

Format as a process provides a valuable framework for evaluating information, though librarians need to be mindful of how they present the concept to students. Instruction must be focused on fostering critical thinking skills, rather than how to perform tasks, and assessment must be qualitative in nature.

Practical implications

These changes in online searching mean that information literacy programs will need to alter their approach to instruction and move beyond the “one shot” paradigm. Critical evaluation is a sustainable, lifelong skill which will continue to serve students after graduation, but developing that ability requires academic librarians to fulfill new roles in the classroom and on campus.

Originality/value

The literature surrounding instruction of Web-scale discovery is still limited, and does not incorporate the threshold concepts provided in Association of College and Research Libraries Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education. This paper concentrates on one such concept, as well as discusses how future concepts could be addressed.

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