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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Micael Dahlén, Henrik Sjödin, Helge Thorbjørnsen, Håvard Hansen, Johanna Linander and Camilla Thunell

This paper aims to investigate how marketing leakage to undesired audiences, a common phenomenon in today's globally connected world of consumers, impacts on the target

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how marketing leakage to undesired audiences, a common phenomenon in today's globally connected world of consumers, impacts on the target audience, and how marketers can mitigate the negative effects of leaked marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct three studies in line with research on the third-person effect (TPE). The studies feature experimental designs with participants from neighbouring countries.

Findings

The first study finds that people in the intended target audience expect and overestimate a (negative) reaction in the undesired audience to marketing leakage, and this impacts negatively on their own reactions. The second study replicates and extends the findings, showing that explicit information that marketing has leaked to an undesired audience impacts negatively on both the attitudes and behaviors of the intended, target audience. The third study tests potential strategies to mitigate the negative effects of leaked marketing and finds that the most important thing is to inform the intended target audience that the undesired audience has accepted the marketer's actions.

Research limitations/implications

Extending the TPE to marketing, this is, to the authors' knowledge, a first investigation of the previously neglected phenomenon of marketing leakage and the impact of undesired audiences on marketing effectiveness. It hopes to stimulate further research on consequences of marketing leakage and enrich research on international advertising and crisis management.

Originality/value

This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first inquiry into how and why marketing leakage to undesired audiences impacts on the intended target audience, and how negative effects can be mitigated. The original use of a third-person approach in this setting helps explain marketing effectiveness and assess managerial strategies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Charles Graham, Ffion Young and Ammarah Marjan

The audience for in-app mobile advertising is comparable in size and viewing rate to that for TV but divides its attention across a highly fragmented selection of apps…

Abstract

Purpose

The audience for in-app mobile advertising is comparable in size and viewing rate to that for TV but divides its attention across a highly fragmented selection of apps, each competing for advertiser revenue. In market, the assumption is that this audience is deeply segmented, allowing individuals to be contextually targeted on the apps that define their interests and needs. But that assumption is not supported by the Laws of Double Jeopardy and Duplication of Viewing which closely predict usage in most mass media. The purpose of this study is to benchmark in-app audiences against these laws to better understand market structure.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected nearly 3,000 h of screen time data from a panel of Generation Z respondents and tested the predictive validity of two models against observed interactions with 23 popular apps in six categories over a week.

Findings

Results show that contrary to industry assumptions, audience for in-app advertising is not segmented. Engagement on individual apps and audience sharing rates between apps and app formats is predicted well.

Research limitations/implications

Optimising in-app advertising for short-term activation only limits its potential for brand building. These findings encourage advertisers to schedule online campaigns for brand reach as well as sales lift, by advancing current understanding of audience behaviour.

Originality/value

Many authors have called for consistency in metrics to compare on- and off-line media performance. This study bridges that gap, demonstrating how reach and frequency measures could inform digital scheduling.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Pavleen Soni and Jyoti Vohra

This paper aims to identify the nature of themes/appeals used in food commercials shown on children’s networks in India. Marketers use various themes/appeals in TV…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the nature of themes/appeals used in food commercials shown on children’s networks in India. Marketers use various themes/appeals in TV advertisements to influence food consumption habits of children. Children are also found to focus on these appeals while selecting foods rather than using nutritional value as a criteria to select foods.

Design/methodology/approach

For the present study, a content analysis of 114 discrete food commercials broadcast on children’s networks was done. These were further analysed to collect data on themes/appeals used in them. SPSS 19.0 was used to record the data and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis.

Findings

A majority of food advertisements which were broadcast during children’s programmes included confectionery, ice creams and dairy products, baked products and ready-to-cook food items. Grazing was found to be the most frequently used appeal in these food advertisements. This was followed by taste/flavour/smell/texture, fun/happiness, being “cool”, adult approval/disapproval, family ties and so on. However, a majority of these advertisements did not feature any health-related message.

Practical implications

The study highlights the need for strategic actions by all stakeholders interested in protecting well-being of children. Taking account of the promotional tactics used by food marketers, parents as well as governmental agencies must strongly take steps to check these practices.

Originality/value

As no such study has already been conducted in India (to the best of researcher’s knowledge), this study potentially helps in abridging gaps in literature.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Timo Dietrich, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Lisa Schuster and Jason P. Connor

Social marketing benchmark criteria were used to understand the extent to which single-substance alcohol education programmes targeting adolescents in middle and high…

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1241

Abstract

Purpose

Social marketing benchmark criteria were used to understand the extent to which single-substance alcohol education programmes targeting adolescents in middle and high school settings sought to change behaviour, utilised theory, included audience research and applied the market segmentation process. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review retrieved a total of 1,495 identified articles; 565 duplicates were removed. The remaining 930 articles were then screened. Articles detailing formative research or programmes targeting multiple substances, parents, families and/or communities, as well as elementary schools and universities were excluded. A total of 31 articles, encompassing 16 qualifying programmes, were selected for detailed evaluation.

Findings

The majority of alcohol education programmes were developed on the basis of theory and achieved short- and medium-term behavioural effects. Importantly, most programmes were universal and did not apply the full market segmentation process. Limited audience research in the form of student involvement in programme design was identified.

Research limitations/implications

This systematic literature review focused on single-substance alcohol education programmes targeted at middle and high school student populations, retrieving studies back to the year 2000.

Originality/value

The results of this systematic literature review indicate that application of the social marketing benchmark criteria of market segmentation and audience research may represent an avenue for further extending alcohol education programme effectiveness in middle and high school settings.

Details

Health Education, vol. 116 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Abstract

Details

Advocacy and Organizational Engagement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-437-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Markus Brauer, Anissa Dumesnil and Mitchell Robert Campbell

Despite more than half a century of academic research, relatively few methods have been shown to reliably improve intergroup relations in the real world. This paper aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite more than half a century of academic research, relatively few methods have been shown to reliably improve intergroup relations in the real world. This paper aims to use a social marketing approach to design a pro-diversity intervention in a university setting.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted extensive qualitative, quantitative and observational background research to identify elements that would increase the effectiveness of the intervention. Focus groups and surveys allowed us to identify a target audience, target behaviors and the relevant barriers and benefits.

Findings

The background research suggested increasing inclusive behavior would have a greater impact than reducing discriminatory behavior. Based on this research, this paper determined an optimal target audience was students who had relatively positive attitudes toward diversity but engaged in few inclusive behaviors. This paper used relevant theories from the behavioral sciences to design an intervention that promoted a small set of inclusive behaviors and that addressed the relevant barriers and benefits. The intervention took the form of a single page of targeted messages that instructors can add to their course syllabi. The page communicates injunctive and descriptive norms, highlights the benefits of behaving inclusively and provides concrete behavioral advice.

Originality/value

The research applies the social marketing approach to a novel domain. This approach represents a new way to advance diversity, equity and inclusion through promoting inclusive and reducing discriminatory behavior.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Yuvay Jeanine Meyers and Allison Janeice Morgan

With African American Millennials being the most intense users of the internet in the USA, based on length of time and frequency, this is a group that should be of…

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1908

Abstract

Purpose

With African American Millennials being the most intense users of the internet in the USA, based on length of time and frequency, this is a group that should be of particular interest to advertisers investing in online campaigns. The current marketing literature states that minorities respond more favorably to media and imagery that is targeted to them. However, this generalization has not been extended to make sure that this new generation and new medium follow the previous findings. The purpose of this paper is to examine how advertising performance is affected by the use of targeted marketing to African American Millennial consumers online.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the McGuire's Distinctiveness Theory as a framework, this study investigates the role of race in online advertising to determine if having a targeted vehicle (a race‐specific website) and or targeted imagery (featuring a race‐specific model) has an influence on an individuals' perception of a product, perception of an advertisement, and intent to purchase a product.

Findings

The findings provide interesting insight into the differences present between previously accepted generalizations and what is found when using a new medium with a new generation. Having a racially targeted media vehicle (website) did not have a significant effect on the resulting marketing outcomes (attitude towards the ad, attitude towards the product and purchase intent) but having targeted imagery (ethnic models) did. This shows that extending the current literature regarding targeted marketing to include the medium of internet and include this new consumer group of Millennials may not be a sound strategy.

Originality/value

The accepted practice of using Black models to target African American consumers is still valid in the online environment, even when the audience is a member of the newer generation. However, according to the findings of this study, media buying practices should be examined in order to identify where targets can be reached beyond racially targeted websites. As this study suggests, the location being racially targeted is not as significant a predictor of success as having advertising images that mirror the self‐identification of the audience.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

David S. Waller and Michael J. Polonsky

Implicit in the traditional model of communication is the assumption that an individual or organization sends a single message to one receiver, or class of receivers…

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2248

Abstract

Implicit in the traditional model of communication is the assumption that an individual or organization sends a single message to one receiver, or class of receivers. However, in practice there are often multiple senders, targeted receivers and even messages. This paper proposes expanding the traditional model of communication to include these additional facets and thus make the model more representative of business communication.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Abstract

Details

Malleable, Digital, and Posthuman
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-621-7

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