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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Nina Geuens, Erik Franck, Peter Vlerick and Peter Van Bogaert

Preventing burnout and promoting psychological well-being in nurses are of great importance. In this study the effect of an online, stand-alone individualized preventive…

Abstract

Purpose

Preventing burnout and promoting psychological well-being in nurses are of great importance. In this study the effect of an online, stand-alone individualized preventive program for nurse burnout based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is described and explained.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method study with an explanatory sequential design was applied. Quantitative data were collected from September 2015 to March 2016 during an intervention study with a pretest-posttest wait-list control group design within a population of hospital nurses in the Dutch speaking part of Belgium. Consecutively, 13 nurses from the intervention group who fully completed the program were interviewed.

Findings

All interviewed participants experienced some sort of effect due to working with the program. Emotional exhaustion remained stable in the intervention group and increased in the control group. However, this difference was not significant. Personal accomplishment decreased significantly within the intervention group when compared to the control group. This might be explained by the self-awareness that was created through the program, which confronted participants with their weaknesses and problems.

Originality/value

This study adds to the understanding of online individual burnout prevention. The results suggest the feasibility of an online program to prevent nurse burnout. This could be optimized by complementing it with organizational interventions, introducing refresher courses, reminders and follow-up. Furthermore, additional attention should be devoted to preparing the implementation in order to minimize attrition rates.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Eyvind Helland, Marit Christensen, Siw Tone Innstrand and Karina Nielsen

This paper explores line managers' proactive work behaviors in organizational interventions and ascertains how their management of their middle-levelness by aligning with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores line managers' proactive work behaviors in organizational interventions and ascertains how their management of their middle-levelness by aligning with the intervention, or not, influences their proactive work behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ findings are based on thematic analysis of 20 semi-structured interviews of university heads of departments responsible for managing organizational interventions.

Findings

The authors found that line managers engaged in a range of proactive work behaviors to implement the organizational intervention (i.e. “driving proactive behaviors”). Furthermore, line managers tended to engage in driving proactive behaviors when they aligned with the organizational intervention, but not to when unconvinced of the intervention's validity.

Practical implications

These findings highlight the importance of senior management and HR investing sufficient time and quality in the preparation phase to ensure all actors have a shared understanding of the organizational interventions' validity.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore line managers' proactive work behaviors to implement an organizational intervention, and how the line managers' management of their middle-levelness influence these proactive work behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Jon Taylor

This paper aims to provide a description of a trauma sensitive intervention for men who have committed sexual offences. The intervention aims to support men to process and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a description of a trauma sensitive intervention for men who have committed sexual offences. The intervention aims to support men to process and make sense of their own experience of trauma before inviting them to acknowledge their role in causing harm to others. The intervention draws on compassion focussed therapy (CFT) as the overarching therapeutic modality.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a service evaluation changes in routine repeat measures completed by service users were analysed prior to joining the intervention and after 12 months of intervention. Service users were encouraged to provide regular feedback relating to their experience of the intervention at regular intervals. This feedback was collated and patterns were identified collaboratively to understand the context for assessed change in the measures.

Findings

Prior to the intervention men reported high levels of shame and limited experiences of guilt (as compassion for others). Early findings indicate that men experience less shame and increased experiences of guilt after 12 months. An increase in insight into risk was also evident. Service user feedback pointed towards a more engaging therapeutic style and highlighted the importance of both a collaborative and trauma sensitive approach.

Originality/value

This is the first evaluative description of forensic CFT for sexual offending. Findings offer insight into potential future directions for forensic interventions with this population.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Francesco Tommasi, Andrea Ceschi, Joshua Weller, Arianna Costantini, Giulia Passaia, Marija Gostimir  and Riccardo Sartori

This paper aims to empirically compare the degree to which two technological interventions, based on the computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically compare the degree to which two technological interventions, based on the computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) and the technology acceptance model (TAM), were associated with a different incidence of financial biases.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quasi-experimental research design. The authors randomly assigned the participants (N = 507) to one of two training conditions or a control group, and in turn, we assessed the incidence of financial biases after the training interventions.

Findings

Participants who took part in the TAM-based group reported lower financial biases than those in the CSCL-based training group and the control group.

Research limitations/implications

Literature suggests that two educational approaches, i.e. the CSCL and the TAM, can implement individuals’ financial decision-making. These educational approaches involve technology to support individuals in reducing the incidence of cognitive biases. This study contributes by advancing empirical evidence on technological supports for interventions to improve financial decision-making.

Practical implications

Suboptimal decision-making may lead to adverse consequences both at the individual and social levels. This paper contributes to the literature on debiasing interventions by offering initial evidence on technological-based interventions in the domain of financial decision-making. The authors discuss the application of this evidence in lifelong training.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence on how different technological interventions are associate with a lower incidence of financial biases.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Kjersti Berge Evensen, Vibeke Hervik Bull and Linda Ness

Prisoners have poorer oral health than the general population. Good oral health is essential for both social and physical well-being. For prisoners, poor oral health is…

Abstract

Purpose

Prisoners have poorer oral health than the general population. Good oral health is essential for both social and physical well-being. For prisoners, poor oral health is also related to drug use after release, whereas good oral health is related to successful reintegration into society. The purpose of this study was twofold: to examine the effect of an intervention based on motivational interviewing (MI) on prisoners’ oral health-related behavior and to assess if the intervention is a good fit for this population.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 16 prisoners in a Norwegian prison were offered a brief MI-based intervention focusing on changing their oral health-related behavior. An oral examination was also performed and the prisoners received a small package containing oral hygiene aids. Two weeks later, a second oral examination and a semi-structured interview were conducted to explore the effect of the intervention and examine the prisoners’ responses to the intervention. Qualitative data analyzes were guided by thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that the intervention had positive effects on both the prisoners’ motivation to use oral health-related behavior and their performance of oral health-related behavior. The findings also indicate that the intervention was well adapted to the target population.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that explore the effect of an intervention in improving prisoners’ oral health and bridges a knowledge gap in the literature. The findings may increase the understanding of how dental services should be organized and offered to provide dental health care to this vulnerable group.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Fouad Jamaani

This paper uniquely aims to triangulate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, government financial intervention (GFI) policies and power distance (PD) culture on returns…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uniquely aims to triangulate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, government financial intervention (GFI) policies and power distance (PD) culture on returns of equity indices during the COVID-19 epidemic in the world's equity markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs panel data regression analysis using 1,937 observations from 19 developed and 42 developing countries. The data employed contain daily registered COVID-19 cases, global equity market index prices, financial intervention policies introduced by governments and Hofstede's cultural dimension measure of PD.

Findings

The authors find that investors certainly react negatively to the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported, that GFI policies indeed reinforce investors' expectations of policymakers' dedication to stabilize the economy during the COVID-19 pandemic and that equity investors in high PD cultures overreact to GFI news, resulting in more positive stock returns. The authors discover a difference between developed and developing countries in terms of the effect of GFI policies and PD on equity returns.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest that investors react negatively to the daily registered COVID-19 cases. The authors find that financial intervention policies introduced by governments reinforce investors' outlooks of policymakers' commitment to stabilize local stock markets during the coronavirus pandemic. The results confirm that equity market investors in PD cultures overreact to financial intervention news, thus resulting in more positive stock returns.

Practical implications

The paper provides three original contributions. First, it helps us to understand the single effect of the COVID-19 and financial intervention policies introduced by governments on returns of the global equity market. Second, it examines the possibility of a two-way joint effect between the COVID-19 and financial intervention policies introduced by governments and the COVID-19 and differences in countries characterized by a PD culture concerning stock market returns. Third, it investigates the possibility of a three-way interaction effect between the COVID-19 contagion, financial intervention policies introduced by governments and culture on returns of equity markets.

Originality/value

The authors' findings are valuable to researchers, investors and policymakers. Culture and finance scholars can now observe the role of Brown et al.'s (1988) uncertain-information hypothesis with reference to the effect of the COVID-19 and financial interventions policies introduced by governments on returns of equity markets. This is because the authors' findings underline that since investors' uncertainty declines with daily registered numbers of COVID-19 cases, the introduction of GFI policies function as a neutralizing device to re-establish investors' expectations to equilibrium. Consequently, stock market returns follow a random walk that is free from the negative effect of the COVID-19. The authors' work is likely to advise equity investors and portfolio managers about the extent to which major exogenous economic events such the outbreak of global diseases, financial interventions policies introduced by governments and differences in countries' PD culture can individually and jointly influence the return of the world's equity markets. Investors and portfolio managers can employ the authors' results as a guideline to adjust their investment strategy based on their investment decision strategy during global pandemics. Policymakers aiming to introduce financial intervention policies to stabilize their stock market returns during global pandemics can benefit from our results. They can observe the full effect of such policies during the current COVID-19, and subsequently be better prepared to choose the most effective form of financial intervention policies when the next pandemic strikes, hopefully never.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Nicola Walker and Rachel Dobbing

Closing the treatment gap in depression is vital to prevent people from losing their jobs. Delivering group-based interventions at work could reach more employees than…

Abstract

Purpose

Closing the treatment gap in depression is vital to prevent people from losing their jobs. Delivering group-based interventions at work could reach more employees than delivering 1:1 interventions in a clinical setting. This study aims to redesign a Treatment Programme to make it more acceptable and accessible for employees with depression.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods exploratory sequential design with a high level of stakeholder consultation was used to redesign an interdisciplinary Work-focussed Relational Group CBT Treatment Programme for moderate-severe depression. Qualitative data from focus groups and quantitative data from a small feasibility study were integrated to develop the new Training (and Staff Support) Programme (TSSP), which was fully specified and manualised in line with the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) for future delivery.

Findings

Focus groups identified a need for improved acceptability and accessibility of the tertiary preventative Work-focussed Relational Group CBT Treatment Programme. This programme was, therefore, simplified for delivery by peer facilitators at the worksite as an intervention for all employees rather than an indicated/targeted intervention for only those with symptoms/risk of depression. The TSSP comprised a compulsory trauma-informed educational/experiential workshop over four days plus optional open-ended, peer-led base groups set up and run by volunteer peer facilitators.

Research limitations/implications

The focus groups comprised a convenience sample who knew the researchers as a colleague or therapist, so there is a risk of selection or relationship bias. They were not involved in the data analysis which undermines the element of co-production and increases the risk of analytic or confirmation bias.

Practical implications

Delivering the new intervention in a group format will require peer facilitators to acquire skills in co-facilitation using a structured-directive leadership style and an awareness of the potential side effects of group-based interventions.

Social implications

The worksite TSSP provides a democratic learning space and empowers employees to stay at work by self-managing their symptoms and by challenging the interpersonal dynamics and organisational structures that might precipitate and perpetuate depression.

Originality/value

This intervention is fully specified and manualised with an explicit programme theory, unlike most universal worksite-based CBT programmes.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Jan Pringle, Ruth Jepson, Alison Dawson, Louise McCabe and Alison Bowes

One limitation of research that assesses the effectiveness of physical activity interventions for people with dementia is that most do not describe the intervention in…

Abstract

Purpose

One limitation of research that assesses the effectiveness of physical activity interventions for people with dementia is that most do not describe the intervention in sufficient detail to ascertain a theoretical basis or mechanism of action that determines the effective components. This paper aims to identify studies which evaluate the mechanisms of action of physical activity interventions for people with dementia, to further inform effective intervention development.

Design/methodology/approach

Papers were screened for evidence of evaluation of specific forms of physical activity, using pre-defined inclusion criteria. Analysis was conducted to ascertain if mechanisms of action were corroborated by data within and between studies.

Findings

The authors identified 26 studies with a measured mechanism of action; these related to the effects of physical activity on either neurological structure or endocrinal markers, including hormones. Physical activity had potential to reduce hippocampal atrophy, increase neural recruitment, activate the noradrenergic system and improve anti-inflammatory responses. While individual studies were hampered by small sample sizes, the body of evidence indicated that physical activity may have potential to delay cognitive decline.

Practical implications

Mechanisms of action in relation to dementia and physical activity are likely to be multifaceted, and physical activity may be protective against progression in the early stages of cognitive decline. Physical activity may be of greatest benefit if incorporated into on-going lifestyle, rather than engaged in for short periods, and combined with social interaction.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in its focus on the mechanisms of action of physical activity interventions for people with dementia.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Markus Brauer, Anissa Dumesnil and Mitchell Robert Campbell

Despite more than half a century of academic research, relatively few methods have been shown to reliably improve intergroup relations in the real world. This paper aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite more than half a century of academic research, relatively few methods have been shown to reliably improve intergroup relations in the real world. This paper aims to use a social marketing approach to design a pro-diversity intervention in a university setting.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted extensive qualitative, quantitative and observational background research to identify elements that would increase the effectiveness of the intervention. Focus groups and surveys allowed us to identify a target audience, target behaviors and the relevant barriers and benefits.

Findings

The background research suggested increasing inclusive behavior would have a greater impact than reducing discriminatory behavior. Based on this research, this paper determined an optimal target audience was students who had relatively positive attitudes toward diversity but engaged in few inclusive behaviors. This paper used relevant theories from the behavioral sciences to design an intervention that promoted a small set of inclusive behaviors and that addressed the relevant barriers and benefits. The intervention took the form of a single page of targeted messages that instructors can add to their course syllabi. The page communicates injunctive and descriptive norms, highlights the benefits of behaving inclusively and provides concrete behavioral advice.

Originality/value

The research applies the social marketing approach to a novel domain. This approach represents a new way to advance diversity, equity and inclusion through promoting inclusive and reducing discriminatory behavior.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Vinita Berry and Chavi Bhargava Sharma

This study aims to highlight the need for an interdisciplinary intervention approach to bring noteworthy changes in children with an autism spectrum disorder. It proposes…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to highlight the need for an interdisciplinary intervention approach to bring noteworthy changes in children with an autism spectrum disorder. It proposes to study how holistic individualized therapeutic plans can promote functionality even in the adolescent age. This study aims to channelize the restricted abilities in a positive manner and make it, a strength for the child. Social-emotional development along with academic goals is also proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an exploratory study where participant observation was the main tool. Unstructured interviews with the therapists were conducted and the background history was taken. Documents and assessments related to the case were referred.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insight into the impact of an interdisciplinary intervention on autism spectrum disorder. It suggests that speech therapy, occupational therapy, special education and counseling taken up as a holistic approach and modified as per the needs and competence of the child prove to be effective. It also becomes evident that intervention can help the child to become functional and meaningful even if the intervention is started a little late in life. Consistency and intensity of interventions along with compassion play a very positive role in the life of children with autism.

Research limitations/implications

As the approach taken describes one case in depth, there is less probability of generalization of results. Therefore, it suggests a wide scope of testing the proposed propositions further.

Practical implications

This paper includes implications for the children with autism spectrum disorder, who: are not able to get early intervention for some reason and the ones who have special restricted abilities. It also is an inspiration for the service providers to develop comprehensive and interdisciplinary plans of intervention.

Social implications

This will help parents who somehow miss providing interventions at an early age to be hopeful and to seek help. The results are encouraging so as to make children with autism spectrum disorder more functional and acceptable in their lives.

Originality/value

This paper worked on the identified needs of children with autism but found that their restricted abilities that are commonly found can be used and channelized positively to become a strength. There is a scope and hope to guide these children toward a functional life where they can connect with others around them and are accepted and included in society. Individualized and interdisciplinary interventions prove to make these children happier and confident.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

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