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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1967

The Minister of Social Security, in exercise of the powers conferred by sections 38(3), 39, 40(4), 41, 42, 50 and 54 of the National Insurance (Industrial Injuries) Act…

Abstract

The Minister of Social Security, in exercise of the powers conferred by sections 38(3), 39, 40(4), 41, 42, 50 and 54 of the National Insurance (Industrial Injuries) Act 1965, and section 75(2) of the National Insurance Act 1965, as amended by sections 8 and 9 of the National Insurance Act 1966, and of all other powers enabling her in that behalf and for the purpose only of consolidating the regulations hereby revoked, after consultation with the Council on Tribunals, hereby makes the following regulations:—

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1969

M.R. Denning, L.J. Salmon and L.J. Winn

March 13, 1969 Trade union — Amalgamation — Pending appeals — Provision for appeal from executive decision to expel member — Rules providing for appeal to be heard at…

Abstract

March 13, 1969 Trade union — Amalgamation — Pending appeals — Provision for appeal from executive decision to expel member — Rules providing for appeal to be heard at specified time — Expelled member setting down notice of appeal — Union amalgamating with another union before appeal heard — New rules for amalgamated unions not covering pending appeals — Expelled member's appeal not heard at specified date — Attempt by new executive to provide for later hearing of pending appeals — Validity — Whether expulsion should be set aside.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1967

The Minister of Social Security, in exercise of the powers conferred by sections 38(3), 39, 40(4), 41, 42, 50 and 54 of the National Insurance (Industrial Injuries) Act…

Abstract

The Minister of Social Security, in exercise of the powers conferred by sections 38(3), 39, 40(4), 41, 42, 50 and 54 of the National Insurance (Industrial Injuries) Act 1965(a), and section 75(2) of the National Insurance Act 1965(b), as amended by sections 8 and 9 of the National Insurance Act 1966(c), and of all other powers enabling her in that behalf and for the purpose only of consolidating the regulations hereby revoked, hereby makes the following regulations:—

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Belinda Schwehr

Rights of appeal against decisions of the new Tribunal are not found in the 1993 Education Act. The statute which creates such a right appears to give a choice of appeal

Abstract

Rights of appeal against decisions of the new Tribunal are not found in the 1993 Education Act. The statute which creates such a right appears to give a choice of appeal route, and does not refer at all to the distinct legal procedure of judicial review. But recent cases have effectively limited rights of appeal from the Tribunal, to an appeal to the High Court on a point of law only, via a particular procedure, and precluded the alternative routes. However, even the way in which the cases are still being indexed and written about, in journals and digests, may perpetuate confusion among practitioners. The writer has heard, anecdotally, that Tribunals themselves are often insisting on being made parties to appeals, and, indeed, SENTs continue to appear in the books as respondents to appeals. The implications for local authority legal and education officers, and for advice workers, particularly as to time limits and legal aid, are considered in this article.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Doreen D. Wu

This paper aims to present the issue of glocalization in transnational advertising and to investigate various patterns of global‐local fusion in the discursive…

2874

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the issue of glocalization in transnational advertising and to investigate various patterns of global‐local fusion in the discursive construction of automobile advertisements in People's Republic of China.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 110 web ads is collected between 2004 and 2005, representing product branding from the local enterprises, the joint‐venture enterprises, and the foreign enterprises in the automobile industry in People's Republic of China. A tripartite framework is developed to examine the patterns of global‐local fusion in the ads along three dimensions: value appeals, language appeals, and visual appeals.

Findings

The paper finds that the global appeals tend to be used more frequently in the value dimension while the local appeals tend to be used more frequently in the language dimension, while there is not much difference in the frequency of distribution in the global versus the local appeals in the visual dimension. Furthermore, a large number of the multinational advertisers tend to hybridize both the global and the local elements and there are three possible patterns as representing the scenarios of the global and local fusion in the discourse of Chinese advertising: weak globalization but strong localization, strong globalization but weak localization, and a balanced correspondence between the global and local elements.

Originality/value

The paper has developed a tripartite framework for systematically examining the phenomenon of global‐local hybridity in the discourse of Chinese advertising and calls for attention to the process as well as products of glocalization in the other forms of transnational corporate practice.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

William McCluskey

Currently, within the UK there are in operation three quite distinct rating appeal systems, one each for England and Wales, for Scotland and for Northern Ireland. In each…

348

Abstract

Currently, within the UK there are in operation three quite distinct rating appeal systems, one each for England and Wales, for Scotland and for Northern Ireland. In each, there are particular rules pertaining to such matters as the rights of a ratepayer to appeal, time limits to instigate appeals and the forums or mechanisms for dealing with appeals. Quinquennial revaluations are now the “norm” for Scotland, England and Wales and potentially for Northern Ireland, with the result that appeals against assessments are increasing across all three jurisdictions. In recognition of the fact that as rating valuers now represent clients across the breadth of the UK, this necessitates a working knowledge of each of the appeal processes. Focuses attention, therefore, on those procedural matters relevant to rating appeals in Northern Ireland.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1976

RON BARNES

In the public dialogue on industrial democracy there has been an undue concentration on certain restricted aspects. Two, in particular, have dominated the debate: how and…

Abstract

In the public dialogue on industrial democracy there has been an undue concentration on certain restricted aspects. Two, in particular, have dominated the debate: how and by whom top policy decisions are to be made; and who is to own the business or how are its benefits to be shared out. This is to neglect certain other basic concepts seen to be critical to the running of a healthy social democracy. One of the important corner‐stones of social democracy is the right of appeal by the citizen against a decision or a judgment made by some person in authority ever that citizen. Speaking in very broad terms, this right of appeal, considered essential in social democracy, has never been transferred to or conceded in industrial democracy in any country. Indeed it is rarely, if ever, raised as an issue. It is the absence of this right of appeal which results in an undue number of strikes — often the only alternative. Right of appeal is a democratic method; instant strike is the primitive use of power. At the forefront of this matter stands Glacier Metal. This article describes the appeals procedure in that company. To avoid any misunderstanding it has to be made clear that what is involved is right of appeal against some order or command made by a manager to one of his subordinates, to which the subordinate might object or feel the order to be in some way unjust or improper.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 8 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2007

Lu Zheng, Joseph E. Phelps, Yorgo Pasadeos and Shuhua Zhou

This study compares the informativeness and the appeals used in magazine advertising in China with those used in France and in the United States. It provides international…

Abstract

This study compares the informativeness and the appeals used in magazine advertising in China with those used in France and in the United States. It provides international marketers with a snapshot of current magazine advertising tactics and provides scholars with an assessment of how consistently expectations based on seminal cross-cultural research predict the informativeness and the appeals used in magazine advertising in each country. Surprisingly, the expectations based on the literature were most often inconsistent with the observations. These findings should serve as a reminder to international marketing scholars that the seminal cross-cultural works, as useful as they are in providing cultural insights, were never intended to apply equally to all subgroups (e.g., the Little Emperors) within a culture.

Details

Cross-Cultural Buyer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-485-0

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2022

Lina Xu and Michael R. Hyman

Responding to a recent editorial call for sustainable development (Truong and Saunders, 2021), this study aims to explore the persuasiveness of climate-change-related appeals.

Abstract

Purpose

Responding to a recent editorial call for sustainable development (Truong and Saunders, 2021), this study aims to explore the persuasiveness of climate-change-related appeals.

Design/methodology/approach

Three scenario-based experiments were conducted to test the effect of climate-change-related appeals on persuasion, the underlying mechanism causing that effect and associated boundary conditions. Statistical results were based on analysis of variance, mediation and moderation analysis.

Findings

Adaptation-oriented appeals are more persuasive than mitigation-oriented appeals. Specifically, adaptation (versus mitigation) appeals activate a self-regulation process that encourages people to think about the future, making them more likely to address climate change. This effect is salient when consumers’ environmental concerns are low.

Practical implications

To boost message persuasiveness, marketers and public policymakers could construct abstract and long-horizon climate-change-related appeals and provide prompts or interventions to promote people’s elaborations about potential outcomes.

Social implications

To boost message persuasiveness, marketers and public policymakers could construct abstract and long-horizon climate-change-related appeals and provide prompts or interventions to promote people’s elaborations about potential outcomes.

Originality/value

Revealing mitigation and adaptation climate-change-related appeals yield diverse effects.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 February 2012

David Caruso

The power of the executive to refer cases involving criminal conviction back to an appellate court is a mechanism for guarding against miscarriages of justice and…

Abstract

The power of the executive to refer cases involving criminal conviction back to an appellate court is a mechanism for guarding against miscarriages of justice and regulating the inherent fallibility of the criminal justice system. These cases typically come before the executive by way of a petition that claims a person has been wrongfully convicted. In Australia, however, there are few guidelines and little information as to the criteria and standards by which the executive decides whether to refer a petitioned case. The test the petitioner must meet is not clear. This chapter therefore has two purposes. The first is to examine the types of petitions most likely to be referred to the appellate court by the executive. These cases are shown to fall into particular categories. The second is to argue that, from these categories, inferences may be drawn about the test the executive uses in deciding whether to refer a petition. These inferences follow from the common principles and links between the cases in each category. The chapter identifies the test the petition should meet to have optimal chance of referral.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-622-5

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