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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Ana Beatriz Hernández-Lara, Alexandre Perera-Lluna and Enric Serradell-López

With the growth of digital education, students increasingly interact in a variety of ways. The potential effects of these interactions on their learning process are not…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growth of digital education, students increasingly interact in a variety of ways. The potential effects of these interactions on their learning process are not fully understood and the outcomes may depend on the tool used. This study explores the communication patterns and learning effectiveness developed by students using two basic synchronous and asynchronous communication tools in e-learning environments, specifically business simulation games.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a quasi-experiment research with 478 online business students, 267 of whom used online discussion forums and 211 interacted via an instant messaging app. The application of learning analytics and text mining on natural language processing allows us to explore the student communication patterns with each of tools and their effectiveness in terms of learning.

Findings

The results confirm the complementarity of the communication tools, asynchronous tools being especially the suitable for task-related communication and synchronous ones for speeding up and facilitating student social interactions.

Originality/value

The main value of this research lies in the use of data analytics and text mining to access and analyse the content of student interactions to assess the learning process in greater depth, comparing synchronous and asynchronous learning modes, considering that little is known about the impact of online synchronous interaction or instant messaging, and even less about the different features, content and performance that emerge when these two learner interaction modalities are compared.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

This chapter seeks to identify the challenges faced by virtual teams and offers solutions to meet those challenges. Basic underlining concepts behind virtual teams are…

Abstract

This chapter seeks to identify the challenges faced by virtual teams and offers solutions to meet those challenges. Basic underlining concepts behind virtual teams are provided along with the most popular forms of virtual teams. Organizational, crowdsourcing, and peer production/online communities are the most common forms of virtual teams. Understanding these basic concepts will help HRD and HRM professionals to develop virtual teams that are suitable for middle- and low-skilled workers. The chapter also presents the various types of communication technologies used in virtual along with the pros and cons associated with each type.

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Christos Fidas, Vasilios Kapsalis, Christos Tranoris and Nikolaos Avouris

The purpose of this paper is to present the design of a context‐aware service for synchronous support in web‐based educational systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the design of a context‐aware service for synchronous support in web‐based educational systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed service supports synchronous interaction among tutors and students, based on their current context, thus increasing the communication channels, the reasoning and the exchanging of ideas.

Findings

The proposed service introduced here gives additional value to distance learning educational systems, as it transforms the web from a medium primarily used for asynchronous communication into a synchronous one.

Originality/value

As educational institutes move their content online and open universities support lessons through the internet, services like the proposed one are of general value.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Giorgos Hlapanis, Maria Kordaki and Angelique Dimitrakopoulou

This study investigates: what kind of e‐moderation is more effective in the formation of successful web‐based courses, and the essential characteristics of synchronous

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates: what kind of e‐moderation is more effective in the formation of successful web‐based courses, and the essential characteristics of synchronous communication (SC) that have a positive contribution in the formation of successful courses.

Design/methodology/approach

The previously mentioned issues investigated a five‐month learning experiment that took place in the context of an e‐learning community consisting of 18 e‐courses dedicated for primary and secondary school teachers. About 59 school teachers participated in this community as trainees, 23 professionals as trainers and two professionals as moderators. In terms of methodology this research can be characterized as a case study. Various data (quantitative and qualitative) were collected from both trainers and trainees regarding the teaching and learning which took place within the context of e‐learning community. These data were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed.

Findings

The analysis of the data shows that: the role of SC is crucial for the formation of successful e‐courses. Four categories of language used that constitute effective SC via chat, applied by an e‐moderator, were identified: social, encouragement, learning and negotiation.

Originality/value

This study contributes in the understanding: that SC is crucial in the formation of successful e‐learning courses, and which are the essential characteristics of SC in order to moderate effectively electronically supported courses.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Dorrie DeLuca and Joseph S. Valacich

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of process improvement team member perceptions regarding the effectiveness of asynchronous e‐collaboration.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of process improvement team member perceptions regarding the effectiveness of asynchronous e‐collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

A field‐based, two‐phase canonical action research study was conducted at two different sites. Data were obtained from observations and interviews of all team members. Media synchronicity theory was utilized to hypothesize the interplay of media capabilities, task communication processes, and team functions.

Findings

Eight primarily virtual teams solved complex problems and provided feedback on the effectiveness of various communications media. The results support media synchronicity theory.

Research limitations/implications

Media synchronicity theory provides an alternative explanation for studies both supporting and contradicting media richness theory. The teams in this study were newly formed. Further investigation of established teams and other contexts is warranted.

Practical implications

For complex problem‐solving tasks performed by newly formed teams, communications media with low synchronicity (e.g. listserv, e‐mail, bulletin board) may be appropriate for conveyance of information; whereas media with high synchronicity (e.g. face‐to‐face, telephone) may be more desirable for convergence on shared meaning.

Originality/value

As geographic, temporal, and cost constraints move organizations toward virtual team work for increasingly complex tasks, research is warranted on effective utilization of available communication technology for solving business problems without face‐to‐face communication. This research paper examines the issue through an emerging theoretical lens, media synchronicity theory, and suggests a new proposition.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Jing Wen and Masoud Gheisari

The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry exists in a dynamic environment and requires several stakeholders to communicate regularly. However, evidence…

Abstract

Purpose

The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry exists in a dynamic environment and requires several stakeholders to communicate regularly. However, evidence indicates current communication practices fail to meet the requirements of increasingly complex projects. With the advent of Industry 4.0, a trend is noted to create a digital communication environment between stakeholders. Identified as a central technology in Industry 4.0, virtual reality (VR) has the potential to supplement current communication and facilitate the digitization of the AEC industry. This paper aims to explore how VR has been applied and future research directions for communication purpose.

Design/methodology/approach

This research follows a systematic literature assessment methodology to summarize the results of 41 research articles in the last 15 years and outlines the applications of VR in facilitating communication in the AEC domain.

Findings

Relevant VR applications are mainly found in building inspection, facility management, safety training, construction education and design and review. Communication tools and affordance are provided or built in several forms: text-based tools, voice chat tool, visual sharing affordance and avatars. Objective and subjective communication assessments are observed from those publications.

Originality/value

This review contributes to identifying the recent employment areas and future research directions of VR to facilitate communication in the AEC domain. The outcome can be a practical resource to guide both industry professionals and researchers to recognize the potentials of VR and will ultimately facilitate the creation of digital construction environments.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Gary Packham, Paul Jones, Brychan Thomas and Christopher Miller

The on‐line tutor or e‐moderator faces a diversity of new challenges, including instructional design, organisation, direct instruction and facilitating discourse. This…

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1413

Abstract

Purpose

The on‐line tutor or e‐moderator faces a diversity of new challenges, including instructional design, organisation, direct instruction and facilitating discourse. This study aims to contrast the views of students and tutors regarding what factors constitute effective e‐moderation in order to identify key attributes of an on‐line tutor.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was adopted. The research utilised a semi‐structured interview technique to collect data contrasting and comparing the views of 35 students and 35 tutors on the constituents of effective e‐moderation.

Findings

The paper finds that from a student perspective the quality of feedback, student support and module management were key attributes of an effective e‐moderator. In contrast tutors argued that motivating students, including the provision of constructive feedback and developing an engaging on‐line persona were critical to successful e‐moderation. Comparison revealed that students and tutors have a broadly similar view to what constitutes effective on‐line moderation and any disparities related to how these groups tended to interact with the learning environment. Students were concerned primarily with how moderation enabled them to engage with the learning environment whereas tutors tended to discuss effective moderation in terms of factors that facilitated the learning process.

Originality/value

The study recognises the key attributes of an effective e‐moderator that should inform course design and tutor training.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Jung Ran Park and Houda El Mimouni

The purpose of this study is to examine how tweeters drawn from three different languages and cultural boundaries manage the lack of contextual cues through an analysis of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how tweeters drawn from three different languages and cultural boundaries manage the lack of contextual cues through an analysis of Arabic, English and Korean tweets.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study is drawn from a corpus of tweets (n = 1,200) streamed using Python through Twitter API. Using the language information, the authors limited the number of tweets to 400 randomly selected tweets from each language, totaling 1,200 tweets. Final coding taxonomy was derived through interactive processes preceded by literature and a preliminary analysis based on a small subset (n = 150) by isolating nonverbal communication devices and emoticons.

Findings

The results of the study present that there is great commonality across these tweets in terms of strategies and creativity in compensating for the constraints imposed by the tweet platform. The language-specific characteristics are also shown in the form of different usage of devices.

Research limitations/implications

Emoticon usage indicates that the communication mode influences online social interaction; the restriction of 140 maximum characters seems to engender a frequent usage of emoticons across tweets regardless of language differences. The results of the study bring forth implications into the design of social media technologies that reflect affective aspects of communication and language-/culture-specific traits and characteristics.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there are no qualitative studies examining paralinguistic nonverbal communication cues in the Twitter platform across language boundaries.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 69 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Pietro A. Sasso and Tyler Phelps

Online courses and self-directed and asynchronous learning may not be the best for everyone. Individuals possess a number of different learning styles and life…

Abstract

Online courses and self-directed and asynchronous learning may not be the best for everyone. Individuals possess a number of different learning styles and life circumstances when they enter higher education. Technology is but one answer to addressing these diverse needs and providing choices to students. Technology should be employed in a way that does not replace this system of choice but enhances it and provides individuals with other opportunities for achieving educational goals. The ideal for higher education lies somewhere in-between the purely digital and purely traditional modes of educational delivery. Lost in this capitulation of higher education to the enrollments of distance education is student success. This chapter will explore challenges to distance education student retention and persistence, disseminate the theoretical construct of the Dynamic Student Development Metatheodel, and apply specific student success strategies to distance education. These strategies include intrusive advising and asynchronous advising techniques. This chapter will conclude with how these advising techniques and strategies can facilitate increased student persistence through engagement with academic advisors using asynchronous approaches that move beyond the traditional temporal, didactic strategies employed by most higher education institutions.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Thomas R. Kochtanek and Karen K. Hein

The introduction of Web‐based course instruction into an existing degree programme offers the opportunity to re‐examine models supporting learning and the transfer of…

Abstract

The introduction of Web‐based course instruction into an existing degree programme offers the opportunity to re‐examine models supporting learning and the transfer of knowledge among students enrolled in such courses. By removing the barriers of time and place, instructors can create and sustain student learning communities supported by interactive communication tools grounded in asynchronous learning models. The instructor’s role moves to that of a facilitator who seeks to stimulate interactions between students and between students and the instructor, in the pursuit of improved learning and knowledge base construction.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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