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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

– To propose a framework for sustainable e-learning to guide development of an innovative learning environment in the higher education sector, particularly in Malaysia.

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975

Abstract

Purpose

To propose a framework for sustainable e-learning to guide development of an innovative learning environment in the higher education sector, particularly in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents a literature review based on searching four well-known online databases to identify articles, books and conference proceedings that discuss e-learning and sustainable development.

Findings

Educational sustainability can mean two things: sustainability of education and education for sustainability. Malaysia – an export-led economy driven by industrial and technological progress – has ambitious plans for further economic development as far ahead as 2020. The government aims to strengthen creativity and innovation by improving the education system. Of course, economic plans have resource implications, and one of the most promising ways of delivering an innovative learning environment is through e-learning. This raises the question of how economic and educational development can be sustained, and the role of e-learning in achieving and maintaining sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

Focuses the literature review on academic publications.

Practical implications

Argues that sustainable e-learning can help the higher education sector to boost the supply of innovative and creative graduates and at the same time, to lower costs through more efficient use of resources.

Social implications

Explains that the sustainable approach to e-learning can increase student motivation, engagement with and control over their learning. It achieves this through the use of developing Web technologies that give them personalized access to a broad range of information resources.

Originality/value

Provides insights into the characteristics of sustainable e-learning and identifies gaps in the existing research. Integrates factors relevant to e-learning, technology and sustainable development into a single framework for sustainable e-learning.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Consuelo L. Waight and Barbara L. Stewart

To illustrate how the interdependence among four championing factors, five antecedents, and four moderators affect companies' efforts in valuing the adult learner in e‐learning.

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4774

Abstract

Purpose

To illustrate how the interdependence among four championing factors, five antecedents, and four moderators affect companies' efforts in valuing the adult learner in e‐learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted to identify the championing factors, antecedents, and moderators that can assist teams in designing e‐learning that values the adult learner. A conceptual model was designed based on the identified factors. The paper provides a description of each factor and provides insight on how the championing factors, antecedents, and moderators are interdependent in valuing the adult learner.

Findings

Engagement, learning, and transfer are major outcomes that can be achieved via e‐learning if desirable championing factors, antecedents, and moderators are adhered. Championing factors include leadership, learning culture, technology infrastructure, and finance. Influencing antecedents include needs assessment, learning analysis, work setting analysis, work analysis, content analysis, and task analysis. Moderators include return on investment, learning theory application, technology, and creativity.

Practical implications

The antecedents, moderators, and outcomes discussed reflect a conceptual model that can be used to guide e‐learning teams in their attempts to value adult learners in their e‐learning designs.

Originality/value

While educational theorists and practitioners have provided a body of literature related to valuing adults in school settings, little investigation has been done in corporate contexts. This conceptual model is important to e‐learning teams within corporate settings as it provides an opportunity for critical reflection on how the adult learner can be valued in their e‐learning efforts.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Tahir M. Nisar

Managers now view e‐learning as an important instrument for obtaining skill‐based organisational outcomes. Not all organisations are likely to implement this training…

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3441

Abstract

Managers now view e‐learning as an important instrument for obtaining skill‐based organisational outcomes. Not all organisations are likely to implement this training strategy, however, because there are significant trade‐offs involved in terms of both costs and benefits. This article examines the organisational determinants of e‐learning: larger establishments, organisations which employ educated workforce and well established internal labour markets are more likely to adopt an e‐learning strategy. The influence of many such factors requires that a value‐based analysis is undertaken to help organisations make optimal decisions about the choice of e‐learning.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Andrew Ettinger, Viki Holton and Eddie Blass

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether the future for e‐learning is as bright as it has previously been heralded, or whether it is likely to fade into the

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6569

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether the future for e‐learning is as bright as it has previously been heralded, or whether it is likely to fade into the background over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on 29 research case studies.

Findings

The importance of time and commitment are drawn out, suggesting that a slower pace of development may not necessarily be a bad thing. Organisations need to focus on what really matters – creating an environment that truly values learning, which for many may involved a substantial culture change. The importance of communication, promotion and marketing are presented, with the commitment from the top giving e‐learning the necessary status it needs in order for it to be taken seriously throughout the company. Selection of technology is also important as this can be a limiting factor to further e‐learning development.

Practical implications

Broader considerations for discussion as to whether an organisation is truly committed to an e‐learning future or not.

Originality/value

This article concludes the series by focussing on what the research tells us for the future development of e‐learning.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Manuela Sarmento

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the contribution of e‐learning in the improvement of quality and productivity in hotels.

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1106

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the contribution of e‐learning in the improvement of quality and productivity in hotels.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on an inquiry answered by 34 hotels that are using e‐learning. For this purpose, a survey on five, four and three star hotels, located throughout Portugal, was conducted between January and March 2009.

Findings

The research reveals that hotels consider that e‐learning increases productivity and production volume. On the other hand, e‐learning contributes significantly to employees' motivation. The paper also concludes that managers' opinions about e‐learning strategies are dependent on the hotel category and head‐office nationality.

Originality/value

e‐Learning is based on information and communication technology and supports the educational process. Owing to the important results achieved, e‐learning is continuously gaining relevance in hotels, and in educational institutions. As such, analysing the contribution of e‐learning for quality improvement in hotels brings originality to the research whilst adding value to the body of knowledge in the industry.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Jianhua Zhao, David McConnell and Yinjian Jiang

This paper aims to first, examine teachers' conception of e‐learning and second, is to reveal how e‐learning is applied in teaching and learning in the field of Chinese…

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1736

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to first, examine teachers' conception of e‐learning and second, is to reveal how e‐learning is applied in teaching and learning in the field of Chinese higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Various issues are reviewed in the instruction part, i.e. e‐learning applications in China, research and practices of e‐learning. The methodology applied in this study is phenomenography. Twenty‐four Chinese participants were interviewed in‐depth based on a protocol developed in the planning stage. The interviews are analysed from a grounded theory perspective and a set of conceptual categories are proposed.

Findings

Five categories, i.e. the centrality of the lecture, online cooperation learning, network learning, student learning, and infrastructure and access are identified in terms of the phenomenographic study. The findings demonstrate that the traditional teaching methods that dominate in China are unlikely to present conditions for mainstreaming e‐learning in the near future.

Practical implications

Traditional Chinese teaching culture still dominates in higher education, and teachers' conceptions do influence their teaching behaviours. Therefore, a training programme could be developed based on the categories of teachers' conceptions of e‐learning.

Originality/value

This study helps us to understand how Chinese teachers understand e‐learning and how they utilise e‐learning in their teaching and learning.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Shraddha Anilkumar and Shalini Ramdas Lihitkar

The purpose of this paper is to know the personalized online student support system provided by e-learning centers, to find out academic advice as Student Support Services…

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770

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to know the personalized online student support system provided by e-learning centers, to find out academic advice as Student Support Services provided by institution running e-learning programs; to find out career counseling as Student Support Services provided by institution running e-learning programs; to find out technical support as Student Support Services provided by institution running e-learning programs; to find out registration assistance as Student Support Services provided by institution running e-learning programs; to find out methods used for paying fee for e-learning programs for LIS education; and to find out financial aid available for students for e-learning programs in LIS education.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is exploratory in nature. In the study, the attempt was made to explore the Student Support Services provided by e-learning institution. It focuses on the various online Student Support Services. Data collection was made through following methods: through Web pages of related departments; by contacting the departments and by sending questionnaires.

Findings

Student Support Services provided by institutions – academic advice: it was observed from Table I that the data were significant (p < 0.05) and that high percentage (60.9 per cent) of universities/institutes provide support systems like academic advice to the students opting LIS courses through e-programs; career counseling: it was observed from Table II that the data were significant (p < 0.05) and that high percentage (60.9 per cent) of universities/institutes provide support systems like career counseling to the students opting LIS courses through e-programs; technical support: it was observed from Table III that 100 per cent universities/institutes provide technical support to the students opting LIS courses through e-programs; and registration assistance: it was observed from Table IV that 100 per cent universities/institutes provide registration assistance support to the students opting LIS courses through e-programs. *Mode of payment of fees for e-learning programs for LIS education: it was apparent from the information (Table V) that mode of payment of fees such as credit card, check and purchase order or money order is available for majority of e-learning courses. *Financial aid available for students for e-learning programs in LIS education: it may be concluded on the basis of the study results (Table VI) that for significantly (p < 0.05) high percentage of LIS courses, the financial aid is not available.

Research limitations/implications

The research work, especially Student Support Services, was limited to only 23 institutions which are running courses in LIS education by e-learning technology.

Practical implications

The present study shows that there is a need to strengthen more Student Support Services. The successful implementation of such a system would need efforts by the concerned management of the institutions and substantial support from the apex statutory organizations. The stakeholders have strongly reinforced the necessity of support strategies which need to start from the time the student enrolls to completion of course. Feedback from students, teachers and researchers should be taken for improving the services. It is useful for those who are running e-learning courses.

Social implications

Students who are taken and studying online courses would be aware of Student Support Services.

Originality/value

This research work is valuable and original, and no prior research has been identified for Student Support Services for e-learning programs in LIS.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Kevin Young

Looks at the findings of a major e‐learning benchmark study conducted in July/August 2001 amongst senior level executives within UK plc across…

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3798

Abstract

Looks at the findings of a major e‐learning benchmark study conducted in July/August 2001 amongst senior level executives within UK plc across industry/manufacturing/retail, financial services, government, education and IT/telecoms sectors. Compares the findings with a similar piece of research carried out in 2000 to establish how e‐learning has developed. Seeks to establish any changes occurring in training and development and to determine the dynamics influencing the strategies and policies of those responsible for employee development. Examines current training and HR issues, training priorities, areas in which training is provided, the most popular types of training delivery, the status of e‐learning, awareness and understanding of e‐learning, current usage, reasons for implementing e‐learning (or for choosing otherwise), benefits anticipated and already experienced by early e‐learning adopters, return on investment and expectations for the future.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Gordon Suddaby and John Milne

The paper aims to discusses two complementary initiatives focussed on developing and implementing e‐learning guidelines to support good pedagogy in e‐learning practice.

Downloads
1428

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to discusses two complementary initiatives focussed on developing and implementing e‐learning guidelines to support good pedagogy in e‐learning practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The first initiative is the development of a coherent set of open access e‐learning guidelines for the New Zealand tertiary sector. The second project, arising from the e‐learning guidelines project, will implement selected guidelines in 18 tertiary institutions and evaluate the implementation processes and the outcomes.

Findings

The guidelines provide a framework for good pedagogical practice that supports quality e‐learning activity and engages staff in critically reflecting on e‐learning practice. The paper describes how e‐learning quality guidelines contribute to enhanced pedagogical quality, greater collaboration, and an approach that is focused on the learner.

Practical implications

Institutions need to provide motivation, support and resources to successfully implement e‐learning guidelines.

Originality/value

The paper describes an innovative approach to collaborating on improving e‐learning quality and coherence across a national tertiary education system.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Lars Unneberg

The aim of this paper is to discuss the key issues of deployment for large enterprises keen to adopt new web‐based learning techniques.

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2244

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to discuss the key issues of deployment for large enterprises keen to adopt new web‐based learning techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper complements the writer's own expertise with external research and reference to large enterprise scale e‐training deployments recently implemented for global companies, including PepsiCo.

Findings

The paper finds that big business is waking up to the efficiency and cost benefits of wide‐scale e‐learning deployment.

Originality/value

This paper launches the debate for enterprise wide e‐learning architectures in large companies.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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