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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Patrick Tierney

Vacation rentals (VRs) are growing in popularity and have disrupted the lodging industry. But they are also controversial because they can literally disrupt quiet…

Abstract

Purpose

Vacation rentals (VRs) are growing in popularity and have disrupted the lodging industry. But they are also controversial because they can literally disrupt quiet residential neighborhoods. There is little research on users of VRs.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 10,000 festival attendees in San Francisco determined if they stayed in VR or commercial lodging and their spending. A second survey of 402 respondents who stayed in a VR asked about their motivations for renting a VR and their evaluation of the experience.

Findings

Results showed users of VRs were motivated by low cost, a convenient location and the nature of the neighborhood. VR user groups were more likely to rent high-end properties, than commercial users. But on a per-person per-day basis, VR users spent $183 on lodging, compared with $264 spent by those opting for a CL. Over half of the respondents stated that the availability of VRs increased the likelihood of them attending the event.

Practical implications

Results suggest that VRs help cover housing costs of VR owners and provide a desired, unique and low-priced lodging opportunity, which can encourage attendance at events. But VRs have both positive and negative disruptive impacts, and more regulation is coming in high-profile urban tourist destinations to mitigate negative effects.

Originality/value

This study consists of original research into VRs, which is a rapidly evolving component of hospitality industry.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Víctor Martínez-Molés, Timothy Hyungsoo Jung, Carmen Pérez-Cabañero and Amparo Cervera-Taulet

This study aims to apply theory on consumer learning in virtual experiences to compare how media technologies (i.e. virtual reality [VR] and standard websites) and users…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to apply theory on consumer learning in virtual experiences to compare how media technologies (i.e. virtual reality [VR] and standard websites) and users’ gender influence the ways in which tourists gather pre-purchase information.

Design/methodology/approach

A laboratory experiment with fully immersive VR was conducted to examine consumers’ behavior in gathering pre-purchase information. The sample comprised 128 consumers who had taken a cruise vacation or who were considering purchasing a cruise package in the near future.

Findings

The results generally reveal the central role of the feeling of presence, which, in turn, positively impacts users’ enjoyment and aspects of consumer learning (i.e. brand attitude, product knowledge and purchase intent). In particular, the results suggest that compared with standard websites, VR facilitated the tourists’ learning as consumers, especially among women, who tend to dominate the information-gathering stage of planning family vacations.

Practical implications

The results imply that travel agencies and tourism centers working with cruise vacation companies should incorporate VR to make their offers more attractive, especially to women.

Originality/value

The study was the first to apply theory on consumer learning in the cruise tourism industry, specifically to compare fully immersive VR devices versus standard websites and gauge the effect of gender.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Emil L. Jacobsen, Alex Solberg, Olga Golovina and Jochen Teizer

Accidents resulting from poorly planned or setup work environments are a major concern within the construction industry. While traditional education and training of…

Abstract

Purpose

Accidents resulting from poorly planned or setup work environments are a major concern within the construction industry. While traditional education and training of personnel offer well-known approaches for establishing safe work practices, serious games in virtual reality (VR) are increasingly being used as a complementary approach for active learning experiences. By taking full advantage of data collection and the interactions possible in the virtual environment, the education and training of construction personnel improves by using non-biased feedback and immersion.

Design/methodology/approach

This research presents a framework for the generation and automated assessment of VR data. The proposed approach is tested and evaluated in a virtual work environment consisting of multiple hazards. VR requires expensive hardware, technical knowledge and user acceptance to run the games effectively. An effort has been made to transfer the advantages VR gives to a physical setup. This is done using a light detection and ranging sensing system, which collects similar data and enables the same learning experiences.

Findings

Encouraging results on the participants’ experiences are presented and discussed based on actual needs in the Danish construction industry. An outlook presents future avenues towards enhancing existing learning methods.

Practical implications

The proposed method will help develop active learning environments, which could lead to safer construction work stations in the future, either through VR or physical simulations.

Originality/value

The utilization of run-time data collection and automatic analysis allows for better personalized feedback in the construction safety training. Furthermore, this study investigates the possibility of transferring the benefits of this system to a physical setup that is easier to use on construction sites without investing in a full VR setup.

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Xiaoting Huang, Chun Liu, Chun LIU, Zhenda Wei and Xi Y. Leung

Drawn from flow theory, this study aims to explore children’s flow experiences in virtual reality (VR) by examining the relationships between VR experience length, arousal…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawn from flow theory, this study aims to explore children’s flow experiences in virtual reality (VR) by examining the relationships between VR experience length, arousal and flow experience (time estimation and enjoyment).

Design/methodolog/approach

A within-subject laboratory experiment was conducted using 9D VR and iMEC 12. A total of 47 children participated in this study. Both survey data and physiological data were collected.

Findings

The results revealed that longer VR videos evoked lower arousal, higher respiratory rates and less enjoyment among child participants than shorter videos. This study also verified the mediating effects of respiratory rates measured arousal on time estimations and self-reported arousal in terms of enjoyment.

Originality/value

This study fills a research gap related to children’s flow experiences in VR, as children’s voices remain limited in tourism research. The study findings offer meaningful insights for destination marketers to leverage the growth of parent-child tours and the increasing effects of VR on the tourism industry.

儿童虚拟现实旅游体验探究: 一项基于沉浸理论的心理-生理研究

研究目的

基于沉浸理论,本研究旨在通过检验虚拟现实(VR)的体验长度、兴奋度, 以及沉浸体验(时间估计和乐趣)之间的关系来探讨儿童的VR沉浸体验。

研究设计/方法/途径

运用9D虚拟现实模拟器和iMEC12, 本研究进行了一项被试内实验。一共有47位儿童参与本研究。收集了调研数据和生理学实验数据。

研究发现

研究结果显示与短VR视频相比, 较长的VR视频导致了较低水平的兴奋度, 较高水平的呼吸率,和较少的乐趣。本研究且还证实了呼吸率测量的兴奋度对时间估计的中介作用 和自我报告的兴奋度对乐趣的中介作用。

研究原创性/价值

由于从儿童角度出发的旅游研究有限, 所以本研究填补了儿童VR沉浸体验领域的研究空白。本研究为目的地营销人员提供了有意义的参考, 从而能有效利用亲子旅游和VR对旅游业日益增长的影响。

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Vito Getuli, Pietro Capone, Alessandro Bruttini and Tommaso Sorbi

Health and safety training via immersive virtual reality (VR) in the construction sector is still limited to few early adopters despite the benefits it could provide in…

Abstract

Purpose

Health and safety training via immersive virtual reality (VR) in the construction sector is still limited to few early adopters despite the benefits it could provide in terms of training effectiveness. To foster its adoption, in this work, the authors address the lack of an organized asset of digital contents dedicated to the production of VR site scenarios that emerged as one of the most limiting factors for the implementation of building information modeling (BIM) and VR for construction workers’ safety training. To improve this critically time-consuming process, a dedicated site object library is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of the site object library for the production of BIM-based VR safety training experiences followed a four-step process: definition of the object list and categories from the analysis of heterogeneous knowledge sources – construction sectors’ regulations, case studies and site scenarios’ imagery; definition of the object requirements (e.g. information, graphics, sounds, animations and more); design of an object information sheet as a library implementation support tool; and library implementation and validation via collaborative VR sessions.

Findings

This work provides the definition of a structured library of construction site objects dedicated to the production of VR scenarios for safety training comprising 168 items, implemented and validated.

Originality/value

The research contributes to facilitate and standardize the time-consuming contents’ production and modeling process of site scenarios for VR safety training, addressing the lack of a dedicated site object library. Furthermore, the novel library framework could serve as a base for future extensions dedicated to other applications of VR site simulations (e.g. constructability analysis).

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Satish Rupraoji Billewar, Karuna Jadhav, V.P. Sriram, Dr. A. Arun, Sikandar Mohd Abdul, Kamal Gulati and Dr Narinder Kumar Kumar Bhasin

The COVID-19 virus outbreak began in December 2019 and rapidly spread to every continent on Earth. The analysts have predicted that COVID-19 and other similar pandemics…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 virus outbreak began in December 2019 and rapidly spread to every continent on Earth. The analysts have predicted that COVID-19 and other similar pandemics will continue in the coming decade and badly affect offline businesses. As a result, the offline platform is also shifting to the online platform and online demands are increasing daily. The traditional two-dimensional E-Commerce websites are designed to provide simple, browser-based interfaces to allow users to access available products and services. Whilst virtual representations are an essential consideration in establishing trust, most virtual representation sites fall short in mimicking real-life human representation. This paper aims to focus on three-dimensional (3D) E-Commerce technology that presents how virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) can help deal with limitations and improve E-Commerce operations. It is built as an internet-only tool, a person-centred shopping assistant created following user-centred design principles to be used on various computing platforms, including desktop and mobile devices. The paper shows how VR and AR can offer more precise product information in 3D E-Commerce environments. The virtual store experience is also enhanced by an AR assistant that helps the users by giving them all the required information in audio form or using its avatar.

Design/methodology/approach

Implementation of VR and AR in E-Commerce will increase customer satisfaction. Sub hypothesis – to study the implementation of VR in E-Commerce. To study the implementation of AR in E-Commerce. To study the inclusion of E-Commerce sites in an open-world game. To study the customer satisfaction of users using VR stores.

Findings

The scope of work is concentrated on the urban Indian market especially targeting the country’s youth who are already or ready to indulge in VR such as video games, cinema and other activities (Mattsson and Barkman, 2019). This demography is more open to learning and using VR. The primary segment of E-Commerce that we are concentrating upon is fashion. Here, the regular user needs to have more immersed knowledge about the product rather than just the written information like how would they look in a dress or will the size available on the website fit me or not.

Originality/value

A perfect system does not exist in the world. A terrible disease has landed on the planet. Very soon, it will be impossible to escape from this current situation. The effects of this plague have been felt in every sector of the world. The researchers also claim that physical stores will continue to exist. There will never be anything that replaces the ability to hold and use products or have personal face-to-face interactions with retail professionals. For the time being, brick-and-mortar retail is having a difficult time, but immersive technology is starting to be used to enhance the in-store experience. The good news is that this should help retailers increase their chances of survival. However, the melody of 3D E-Commerce is it would help out the in-store experience.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Michele Simoni, Annarita Sorrentino, Daniele Leone and Andrea Caporuscio

This study aims to provide an exploratory analysis of the role of virtual reality (VR) in the cruise context as a contribution to the limited literature on this topic. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide an exploratory analysis of the role of virtual reality (VR) in the cruise context as a contribution to the limited literature on this topic. In particular, the research investigates immersive VR as a critical touchpoint at the pre-purchase stage of the customer journey.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the research aims, the authors use a case study approach by analysing the “immersive configurator” (essentially a virtual catalogue) implemented by the Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC).

Findings

Three innovative functions emerged from the study of the MSC’s virtual catalogue. First, it improves the customer experience and engagement through its interactivity. Second, it allows customization of the prospective cruise experience by selecting and changing types of ship, the level of service, the position of the cabin and much more. Third, it becomes a new digital marketing system endowed with large amounts of data.

Research limitations/implications

This study advances the current state of knowledge by presenting an empirical case study on the role of immersive VR at the pre-purchase stage of the customer journey. Second, it offers interesting implications for managers who want to take advantage of the opportunities offered by VR.

Originality/value

The present study analyses the pre-purchase stage in tourism marketing focused on the use of VR in the tourist experience at the time of service delivery. Second, it enriches the tourism literature by integrating supply-side and demand-side perspectives. Third, from a methodological point of view, this paper offers an in-depth qualitative study in a context where scholars have mostly applied quantitative methods.

通过虚拟现实来提高预购体验:洞悉游轮产业摘要

研究目的

以邮轮产业为背景, 鉴于少量的相关文献, 本研究对虚拟现实提供了初步研究。 本论文以侵入式虚拟现实作为顾客购买前关键体验点进行了探索。

研究设计/方法/途径

为实现研究目的, 本论文运用了案例研究发来分析地中海航运公司MSC目前使用的“侵入式配置程序” (尤其作为虚拟目录)。

研究结果

通过对MSC虚拟目录的研究, 我们发现了其三大创新功能。第一, 可有效的通过互动来提高顾客体验和参与。第二, 可允许对预期的游轮体验通过选择游轮种类, 服务等级, 船舱的位置等, 来进行量身定制。第三, 基于大量数据积累, 可作为数字营销系统。

理论贡献

通过实证案例研究, 本论文对侵入式虚拟现实在顾客预购体验中的研究文献进行了有效推进。其二, 本研究为期望运用虚拟现实的从业人员提供了新颖的实践知识。

研究原创性/价值

本研究在聚焦在虚拟现实技术运用在旅游营销中的前期游客体验。第二, 本研究整合了供给和需求两方面的视角。第三, 从研究方法的角度, 本研究在普遍运用定量研究的领域提供了深入的定性研究。

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Mirza Rayana Sanzana, Mostafa Osama Mostafa Abdulrazic, Jing Ying Wong, Kher Hui Ng and Shams Ghazy

This paper presents an educational virtual reality (VR) game and experiments with different methods of including it into the teaching process. The purpose of this research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents an educational virtual reality (VR) game and experiments with different methods of including it into the teaching process. The purpose of this research study is to discover if immersive VR games can be used as an effective pedagogical tool if blended with traditional lectures by assisting learning gain, memory and knowledge retention while increasing edutainment value.

Design/methodology/approach

This research design comprises three different methods of learning: lecture-based involving lecture slides, infographics, and a video, game-based involving an immersive VR game of oil rig exploration, and the combination of lecture and game-based. Participants of each method filled up a questionnaire before and after participation to measure the learning gain, memory, and knowledge retention.

Findings

From the predominant findings of the study, the combined method demonstrated a significant increase in learning gain, memory, and knowledge retention and maybe a potentially suitable pedagogical tool.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include findings based on one VR game with a specific educational topic, additionally, it is suspected that having different participants for each of the three methods may have slightly affected the results, albeit to a limited extent.

Practical implications

Findings of this study will provide evidence that VR games can be used alongside traditional lectures to aid in the learning process. Educators can choose to include VR games into their curriculums to improve the educational delivery process.

Originality/value

This research contributes to ways of incorporating VR games into educational curriculums through findings of this study highlighting the combination of VR games with lectures.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Meredith Thompson, Cigdem Uz-Bilgin, M. Shane Tutwiler, Melat Anteneh, Josephine Camille Meija, Annie Wang, Philip Tan, Richard Eberhardt, Dan Roy, Judy Perry and Eric Klopfer

This study isolates the effect of immersion on players’ learning in a virtual reality (VR)-based game about cellular biology by comparing two versions of the game with the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study isolates the effect of immersion on players’ learning in a virtual reality (VR)-based game about cellular biology by comparing two versions of the game with the same level of interactivityand different levels of immersion. The authors identify immersion and additional interactivity as two key affordances of VR as a learning tool. A number of research studies compare VR with two-dimensional or minimally interactive media; this study focuses on the effect of immersion as a result of the head mounted display (HMD).

Design/methodology/approach

In the game, players diagnose a cell by exploring a virtual cell and search for clues that indicate one of five possible types of cystic fibrosis. Fifty-one adults completed all aspects of the study. Players took pre and post assessments and drew pictures of cells and translation before and after the game. Players were randomly assigned to play the game with the HMD (stereoscopic view) or without the headset (non-stereoscopic view). Players were interviewed about their drawings and experiences at the end of the session.

Findings

Players in both groups improved in their knowledge of the cell environment and the process of translation. Players who experienced the immersive stereoscopic view had a more positive learning effect in the content assessment, and stronger improvement in their mental models of the process of translation between pre- and post-drawings compared to players who played the two-dimensional game.

Originality/value

This study suggests that immersion alone has a positive effect on conceptual understanding, especially in helping learners understand spatial environments and processes. These findings set the stage for a new wave of research on learning in immersive environments; research that moves beyond determining whether immersive media correlate with more learning, toward a focus on the types of learning outcomes that are best supported by immersive media.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 122 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Maha Hosny Elgewely, Wafaa Nadim, Ahmad ElKassed, Mohamed Yehiah, Mostafa Alaa Talaat and Slim Abdennadher

This research proposes a virtual reality (VR) platform for construction detailing that provides experiential learning in a zero-risk environment. It builds on integrating…

Abstract

Purpose

This research proposes a virtual reality (VR) platform for construction detailing that provides experiential learning in a zero-risk environment. It builds on integrating VR technology as a medium and building information modeling (BIM) as a repository of information and a learning tool.

Design/methodology/approach

This work discusses the proposed environment curricular unit prototype design, implementation and validation. The validation of the VR environment was conducted in three phases, namely, piloting, testing (system usability and immersion) and learning gain validation, each of which has its aim and outcomes and has been assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively.

Findings

After considering the feedback, the VR environment prototype is then validated on the level of learning outcomes, providing the evidence that it would enhance students' engagement, motivation and achievement accordingly. The results indicated 30% learning progress after experiencing the VR environment vs. 13.8% for paper-based studying.

Originality/value

In reference to building construction education, construction site visits provide students with real-life practical experience which are considered an extension for classroom. Nevertheless, it is challenging to integrate construction site visits regularly during the academic semester with respect to the class specific needs. The research at hand adopts integrating VR and BIM in AEC (Architecture, Engineering and Construction) education by proposing a system that can work as a mainstream complementary construction detailing learning method for architecture students. The proposed VR system facilitates a virtual construction site that meets the learning needs where students can explore and build in a real scale environment.

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