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Article

Gary B. Brumback

In a team‐based organization, the performance not only of the teams as a whole but also of their individual members needs to be managed and managed very well if tall…

Abstract

In a team‐based organization, the performance not only of the teams as a whole but also of their individual members needs to be managed and managed very well if tall performance (consistently competent, ethical, and motivated behavior that always produces the best results) is to be reached and sustained. In this article, four principles are first overviewed that underlie a new model of performance management designed by the author. The principles are those of tall performance, accountability, responsible empowerment, and performance management. An overview of the new model is then given. Among the model’s salient features are the way it preserves the “we” without sacrificing the “me”, a non‐traditional way to do performance appraisals, and accountability not only for results but also for behaviors, including ethical conduct.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

This paper aims to examine the influence of shared leadership on team performance in terms of quantity and quality and in addition the moderating effect of task complexity…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of shared leadership on team performance in terms of quantity and quality and in addition the moderating effect of task complexity on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was gathered from 26 teams of students from a major university in Germany who completed a laboratory team decision-making exercise.

Findings

The results suggest that teams sharing leadership showed better team performance and made fewer errors. They achieved higher levels of quality of performance. In addition, if the team members viewed the task as highly complex then the quality of their performance was increased.

Practical implications

Therefore for organizations to optimize team performance shared leadership should be promoted, the SNA should be used to develop interventions and training and influencing perceptions of task complexity should be considered as an important strategy to stimulate shared leadership in teams.

Originality/value

This paper has an original approach by testing for the first time how perceived task complexity moderates the relationship between shared leadership and team performance and by developing an original team task to investigate shared leadership.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article

Marla Hacker

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most…

Abstract

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most often hypothesized to influence team performance. To date, though, we still do not really understand why some teams perform better than other teams. Studies have provided mixed findings and inconclusive results. The study described in this article continues the search for variables that influence project team performance. The findings provide support for an increasingly, albeit controversial, discussion occurring within human resource circles, concerning the impact of top performers on team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Jonas Debrulle, Johan Maes and Elliroma Gardiner

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to understanding the impact of entrepreneurial team composition on new venture performance. Different types of entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to understanding the impact of entrepreneurial team composition on new venture performance. Different types of entrepreneurship motivation among founding team members are defined. Using a relatively recent theory as a framework (i.e. self-determination theory), the authors group these motives into two categories: autonomous and controlled motivation. The business impact of the level of each type of motivation within the team, as well as the impact of having team members with different motivational drivers, is examined. New venture performance is modelled in two different ways: financial performance (i.e. return on assets) and innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The analyses are based on 66 founding teams active in diverse activity sectors. The teams represent a total of 142 business founders. Data was collected through structured interviews, a company questionnaire and a secondary data source (i.e. certified financial statements).

Findings

The results confirm that the level of autonomous motivation within the team contributes to start-up financial performance, whereas the level of controlled motivation hampers innovation performance. No direct effects of diversity of team member motivation on start-up performance were discovered.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to study multiple firm performance effects of the composition of entrepreneurial founding teams in terms of motivation.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Fatima Elyousfi, Amitabh Anand and Audrey Dalmasso

This study examines the effect of various attributes of leadership and teams, modeled as perceived e-leadership and perceived team dynamics on virtual team (VT) performance

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effect of various attributes of leadership and teams, modeled as perceived e-leadership and perceived team dynamics on virtual team (VT) performance in a public organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey instrument, data were collected from 184 participants involved in a virtual workplace from one of the largest Canadian public organizations. This study uses PLS-SEM software and quantitative methods.

Findings

This research identified that perceived team dynamics, which includes team member behavior, collaboration and support, has a significant medium effect on VT member performance. However, perceived e-leadership, which includes leaders' trust, leader communication/co-ordination and leader behavior, has a significant small effect on VT performance.

Originality/value

This study contribute to literature on VTs and VT's performance specially in public organizations. As the existing literature on employee performance has mainly focused on private organizations, and more so on VTs. However, little is known about VTs in public organizations and specifically about their performance.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article

Nandan Prabhu, Badrinarayan Srirangam Ramaprasad, Krishna Prasad and Roopa Modem

This study explores the mediating influences of team reflexivity and workplace spirituality in the shared transformational leadership-team performance relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the mediating influences of team reflexivity and workplace spirituality in the shared transformational leadership-team performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the cross-sectional research design, this study collected data from 130 ongoing teams working in India's information technology (IT) sector. The study collected data on shared transformational leadership by adopting the referent-shift consensus method while collecting data on team performance from managers. Thus, the study explored the relationships among the constructs of this research by using multi-source data.

Findings

This study has shown that shared transformational leadership induces workplace spirituality and team reflexivity among team members. This research's results show that workplace spirituality mediates the shared transformational leadership-team performance and shared transformational leadership-team reflexivity relationships. This research has also demonstrated that team reflexivity mediates the shared transformational leadership-team performance relationship.

Practical implications

Necessity to facilitate relational job design changes, knowledge sharing, intellectual stimulation is the primary managerial implication of this study. This study also articulates the need to pay attention to create organizational conditions for the emergence of workplace spirituality.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has positioned shared transformational leadership and workplace spirituality as the antecedents of team reflexivity. This research has shown the value and limitation of team reflexivity in ongoing teams.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article

Yang Cui and Guilan Yu

In the field of innovation, individual innovative performance also has an important impact on team and organizational innovative performance, thus it is necessary to…

Abstract

Purpose

In the field of innovation, individual innovative performance also has an important impact on team and organizational innovative performance, thus it is necessary to identify factors that increase individual innovative performance. One key to unlock individual innovative performance is empowering leadership. Drawing on the Ability-Motivation-Opportunity (AMO) theoretical framework, this study investigates the cross-level influence of team-directed empowering leadership on subordinates' innovative performance and verifies the mediating role of creative self-efficacy (A), intrinsic motivation (M), team knowledge sharing (O) and the moderating effect of feedback seeking climate.

Design/methodology/approach

With a sample of 102 teams and 722 employees, this study uses Mplus7.4 software to carry out cross-level model analysis based on MSEM multilevel mediation test methodology.

Findings

The results from cross-level analysis indicate that: (1) Team-directed empowering leadership has a significant positive impact on subordinates' innovative performance. (2) Team-directed empowering leadership enhances subordinates' innovative performance through the improvement of creative self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation and team knowledge sharing. (3) Based on the feedback perspective, feedback seeking climate moderates the relationship between team-directed empowering leadership and creative self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation and team knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

This study introduced the AMO theory into the research on cross-level mediating mechanism between team-directed empowering leadership and subordinates' innovative performance, which broadens the theoretical research perspective. Considering the difference between empowering leadership and laissez-faire leadership and the guiding role of feedback, this study selects feedback seeking climate as a moderator in view of feedback, which riches the contingency factors on the cross-level effect of team-directed empowering leadership.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Jiyeong Han, Jeewhan Yoon, Woojae Choi and Gyehoon Hong

This study aims to investigate the relationship between shared leadership and team performance at the team level. Drawing on conservation of resources (COR) theory, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between shared leadership and team performance at the team level. Drawing on conservation of resources (COR) theory, the authors examine whether shared leadership is associated with team performance through team positive psychological capital (PsyCap). This study further examines whether task-oriented and relationship-oriented shared leadership affect team performance differently.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi-source survey data were obtained from 92 team leaders and 319 employees. An aggregation approach was used to analyze the data at the team level.

Findings

A high level of shared leadership positively influences team performance through the mediation of team PsyCap. Moreover, relationship-oriented shared leadership is positively associated with team performance through team PsyCap, while task-oriented shared leadership is negatively associated with team performance without the mediating effect of team PsyCap.

Practical implications

By focusing on the negative effects of task-oriented shared leadership and the positive effects of relationship-oriented shared leadership and team PsyCap on team performance, this study suggests new ways to manage team performance effectively and extends shared leadership literature.

Originality/value

This study applied COR theory to analyze the effect of shared leadership mediated by team PsyCap on team performance. It contributes to shared leadership literature by shedding light on the negative effects of task-oriented shared leadership and on the positive aspects of relationship-oriented shared leadership.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Nattaya Chamtitigul and Weining Li

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of team learning processes (information acquisition, information processing and information storage and retrieval) on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of team learning processes (information acquisition, information processing and information storage and retrieval) on team performance in software development projects and to assess the effect of ethical leadership and its influence on these processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined 354 software development project teams in Thailand. A quantitative study was conducted through a Web-based survey, with structural equation modelling used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results of this study revealed that ethical leadership is positively correlated with the team learning processes of information acquisition, information processing and information storage and retrieval. However, only information processing and information storage and retrieval are positively related to team performance. The results indicate that ethical leadership has a positive direct effect on team performance. The results also show that the positive relationship between ethical leadership and team performance is partially mediated by team learning processes, namely, information processing and information storage and retrieval.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the importance of ethical leadership and guides managers towards considering the characteristics of both ethical leadership and team learning processes for enhancing team performance in software development projects.

Originality/value

This is the first study to the best of authors’ knowledge to examine the role of team learning processes in mediating the relationship between ethical leadership and team performance, particularly concerning software development projects. The present research contributes to the literature on team performance management, emphasising the manner in which ethical leadership can result in team learning and team performance. The findings of this study can be used to encourage organisations to develop ethical leadership behaviours and team learning processes in software development projects.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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