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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2021

Tahira Sadaf, Rakhshanda Kousar, Zia Mohy Ul Din, Qaisar Abbas, Muhammad Sohail Amjad Makhdum and Javaria Nasir

This study aims to analyze access of cotton growers to Sustainable Livelihoods Assets Pakistani Punjab.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze access of cotton growers to Sustainable Livelihoods Assets Pakistani Punjab.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the department for international development (DFID’s) sustainable livelihoods framework (DFID) (1999). Where data collection was done by using a well-structured questionnaire from 200 randomly selected cotton growers of the district Muzaffargarh. There are five livelihood assets (human assets, natural assets, financial assets, physical assets and social assets) in the SLF, this study has used three different indicators/proxies for each asset except natural assets, where four indicators were used to capture the salient features of the respondents’ access to that assets. Each indicator was given a weight by using the entropy technique to keep the consistency of the quantification. Livelihood assets indices were calculated in case of each livelihood asset for conducting Livelihood Assets Pentagon Analysis. Value of livelihood index ranged from 0–4.

Findings

Livelihoods Assets Pentagon analysis shows that cotton growers do not have proper access to all five livelihood assets. The asset with the highest capacity were social assets (sustainable livelihood index value = 0.3994), followed by natural assets (0.3294), financial assets (0.2511), human assets (0.2143) and physical assets (0.0897).

Originality/value

This study uses the SLF developed by DFID for analyzing factors affecting access to livelihoods assets of cotton growers in Pakistani Punjab. Sustainable agriculture and sustainable rural livelihoods lead to sustainable livelihoods where environment quality is taken into consideration. The study contains significant and new information.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Bob Alexander, Catherine Chan‐Halbrendt and Wilmar Salim

The purpose of this paper is to build on recent analysis of sustainable vulnerability reduction of the Government of Indonesia tsunami rehabilitation and reconstruction…

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5117

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build on recent analysis of sustainable vulnerability reduction of the Government of Indonesia tsunami rehabilitation and reconstruction plan by applying a sustainable livelihood framework for disaster risk management (DRM) for improvement in understanding potential livelihood strategies for the specific context of vulnerable people previously involved in fisheries livelihoods in Aceh.

Design/methodology/approach

Brief discussion of the preliminary findings of the work of Salim reveals the recommendation of further examination within a sustainable livelihoods DRM framework. Thus, after development and exposition of this framework, interviews and secondary research allow brief description of the context in which livelihood strategies might be implemented.

Findings

By combining the preliminary assessment of resource provisions with discussion of the institutional and vulnerability context of fisheries activities, preliminary recommendations of important considerations in developing appropriate vulnerability‐reducing livelihood strategies are listed under the categories of resource provisions.

Originality/value

This paper should be valuable to researchers interested in further development of applicable DRM models and to government and non‐government agencies interested in the effectiveness of assistance in achieving long‐term sustainable livelihood and sustainable development goals.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Gabriel C.M. Laeis and Stefanie Lemke

This paper aims to investigate whether the sustainable livelihoods approach (SLA) enables an analysis of the complex interrelations and interdependencies between social…

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3129

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether the sustainable livelihoods approach (SLA) enables an analysis of the complex interrelations and interdependencies between social entrepreneurs (SEs), destination communities’ livelihood assets and related transforming structures and processes. SEs in tourism are regarded as drivers for linking destination communities with enterprises, aiming to create economic benefits and livelihoods.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through participatory action research at a tourism lodge and its foundation, which facilitated agricultural training, and by conducting in-depth interviews with ten key stakeholders. The sustainable livelihoods framework (SLF) served as the theoretical framework.

Findings

The SLA enables an analysis of interrelations and interdependencies between various stakeholders and to visualise the way SEs forge the impacts tourism has on livelihoods. The agricultural project did not reach its full potential because of, amongst other factors, competing aims between the profit and non-profit business, resulting in the lack of a clear vision and strategy. Additional challenges were dependency on external funding and a lack of reciprocal communication between the stakeholders involved.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on one case study, and findings cannot be generalised. Future studies should develop the SLF further, possibly through adaptation and integration of other tools.

Practical implications

The SLF enables researchers to integrate local knowledge and participatory research methods, thus facilitating engagement and learning between different stakeholders.

Originality/value

Through empirical research, this paper adds valuable insights into the applicability of the SLF in the context of social entrepreneurship in tourism.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2012

Corinne Gregoire

The purpose of this paper is to begin charting the discussion of sustainable livelihoods (SLs) towards the Caribbean. Its aim is to put this debate within a Caribbean…

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283

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to begin charting the discussion of sustainable livelihoods (SLs) towards the Caribbean. Its aim is to put this debate within a Caribbean context and start the process of building the theory that can be adequately applied to Caribbean economies. The end point of this paper, which should be the starting point of the discourse, would be the development of a working definition of the concept based on what constitutes life in the Caribbean. This paper begins the discourse on the development of a Caribbean specific definition of SLs. Many authors and organizations have defined the concept; however, some believe that the existing definitions are too theoretical. Given this, the Caribbean must find a common ground upon which this concept can become useful, as it is based on developing islands with many peculiarities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds the definition by first, summarizing the Caribbean reality; second, by considering the reflections on the concept both internationally and regionally and finally, concluding with the definition of the concept.

Findings

Presently, the literature from the Caribbean region is still being developed. It is similar to that compiled internationally, particularly that of the Department for International Development (DFID), as DFID ' s methodology is most frequently used. However, emphasis has been placed on poverty, conservation and management of natural resources, governance, entitlements and capabilities and individual level development.

Originality/value

The concept highlights some Caribbean peculiarities and applies them to sustainable livelihoods. This definition can be applied to the determination of an index to access the quality of Caribbean livelihoods. It can be used by development practitioners in the determination of sustainable livelihood patterns.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Astrid von Kotze

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the adequacy of UNESCO policy in the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. People working in the informal economy…

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1053

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the adequacy of UNESCO policy in the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. People working in the informal economy in the Global South are looked at as a starting point.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines UNESCO/UNEVOC documents, the UNIFEM report on the “Progress of the World's Women”, development literature, and case scenarios from Southern Africa.

Findings

There is a mismatch between policy and the reality on the ground. Changes in policy and provision are necessary if a social justice agenda is to be met.

Practical implications

The approach to TVET planning and provision should shift in three ways: from an emphasis on the formal to the informal economy; from work defined as employment to work as livelihood activities; and from sustainable development to sustainable livelihoods. The paper argues that five conditions should be met so that TVET can begin to include workers from the informal economy.

Originality/value

The paper defines “work” more inclusively, focuses on education and learning in the informal economy, and challenges notions of sustainable development in favour of sustainable livelihoods.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Joseph Ikechukwu Uduji and Elda Nduka Okolo-Obasi

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the multinational oil companies’ (MOCs’) corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives in Nigeria. Its special focus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the multinational oil companies’ (MOCs’) corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives in Nigeria. Its special focus is to investigate the impact of Global Memorandum of Understandings (GMOUs) on rural young people involved in non-timber forest products (NTFPs) for sustainable livelihood in Niger Delta, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected from primary sources, using participatory rural appraisal technique of semi-structured interview questionnaire. The use of participatory research techniques in collecting CSR impact data especially as it concerns the rural young people is because it involves the people being studied, and their views on all the issues are paramount. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data. Inferential statistical tool – estimation of logit model was used to test the two research hypothesis.

Findings

The results indicate that GMoUs have not given adequate attention to young people as a special target sub-group who live in rural areas and depend mostly on NTFPs. Results also show that a number of factors hindering rural young people from the use and development of NTFPs include a policy vacuum, non-destructive harvesting, and destruction of natural habitats, bushfires, population growths and high demands.

Research limitations/implications

The semi-structured interview questionnaire was directly administered by the researchers with the help of research assistants. The use of local research assistants was because of the inability of the researchers to speak the different local languages and dialects of the many ethnic groups of Ijaws, Ogonis, Ikweres, Etches, Ekpeyes, Ogbas, Engennes, Obolos, Isokos, Nembes, Okirikas, Kalabaris, Urhobos, Iteskiris, Igbos, Ika-Igbos, Ndonis, Orons, Ibenos, Yorubas, Ibibios, Anangs, Efiks, Bekwarras, Binis, Eshans, Etsakos, Owans, Itigidis, Epies, Akokoedos, Yakkurs, etc., in the sampled rural communities.

Practical implications

An appropriate GMoU-intervention framework for sustainable promotion of NTFPs, domestication of NFTPs, improving harvesting and processing techniques are necessary to facilitate good security, reduction of poverty and improved livelihoods, particularly for the economically-marginalized and forest-dependent rural young people is imperative.

Social implications

Sustainable livelihoods of the forest-dependent rural young people in sub-Saharan Africa would require some focussed CSR interventions on the NTFPs for sustainable livelihood. Facilities pertaining to storage, grading, processing and value addition through the convergence of existing schemes and programmes should be promoted and created. MOCs are in a position to empower the rural young people with information about the market, policy and products to enable the rural people strategizing and accessing returns from NTFPs in sub-Saharan Africa.

Originality/value

This research adds to the literature on multinational enterprises’ CSR initiatives in developing countries and rationale for demands for social projects by host communities. It concludes that business has an obligation to help in solving problems of sustainable livelihood.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2011

Corinne Gregoire

Developing and maintaining a pattern of sustainable livelihood (SL) is dependent upon the use to which we put our resources, particularly, our natural resources. SL is…

Abstract

Developing and maintaining a pattern of sustainable livelihood (SL) is dependent upon the use to which we put our resources, particularly, our natural resources. SL is dependent upon five principal components; namely the vulnerability context, livelihood assets, transforming structures and processes, livelihood strategies and livelihood outcomes. DFID (1999), DFID, FAO, IFAD, UNDP, WFP (2001) liveli hood assets also have many components one of which is natural assets/capital. Once the environment is shocked the natural assets are directly affected and all other types of assets and principal components become inoperable. The livelihood outcomes of the Caribbean people, poor and otherwise, are therefore linked to these natural as sets. The objective of this study is to possibly shape and create ways of developing and maintaining patterns that can lead to SLs. It should focus on the available natural resources, access to and optimal use of, which can transit into the best livelihood outcomes specifically for the poor. Basically, the outcome should be a body of knowledge that can contribute to SLs within the Caribbean. This is done with the use of two case studies of Caribbean islands, namely St. Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) and Grenada. This paper is divided into four sections. Section one provides the background for the paper and briefly introduces the concept of SL. Section two outlines the SL approach. Section three provides an application of the SL approach in SVG and Grenada from two varying standpoints. Section four makes concluding remarks on the types and the sustainability of the livelihood strategies and outcomes.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Donald Flywell Malanga and Memory John Banda

This study aims to assess the impact of mobile phones on the livelihoods of women microenterprises in two selected districts of Malawi.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the impact of mobile phones on the livelihoods of women microenterprises in two selected districts of Malawi.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted an interpretive qualitative approach. The authors conducted six focus group discussions with 33 women microenterprise owners in two selected districts of Malawi. This study was guided by the sustainable livelihood approach as an analytical framework.

Findings

The findings confirmed that to some extent use of mobile phones by women microenterprises helped them realise their livelihood outcomes. These included improved access to information, improved communication, improved marketing, reduced transport costs and improved efficiency and productivity. However, optimum benefits were highly curtailed by a number of factors such as poor information and communication technologies (ICT) infrastructure, security issues, high cost of talk time and data bundle, lack of ICT literacy, low education and sociocultural factors.

Originality/value

The findings provide evidence on the role of mobile phone technology play in promoting the value for women participating in business activities in disadvantaged communities. Policymakers and other stakeholders can use the findings as a basis for prioritising the improvement of mobile technology infrastructure in rural communities tailor-made to women microenterprises.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Thu Trang Thi Ngo, Hong Quan Nguyen, Timothy Gorman, Quang Ngo Xuan, Phuong Lan Thi Ngo and Ann Vanreusel

Drought and salinity intrusion aggravated by climate change threaten agricultural livelihoods in Viet Nan's Mekong Delta. In response, authorities have built water…

Abstract

Purpose

Drought and salinity intrusion aggravated by climate change threaten agricultural livelihoods in Viet Nan's Mekong Delta. In response, authorities have built water management infrastructure for irrigation and salinity protection. This study assessed the impact of one such project, the Ba Lai dam in Ben Tre province, on the livelihoods of aquaculture farmers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework to assess the impact of the Ba Lai dam on the livelihood capitals of 18 farming households in four communes, located both upstream and downstream of the dam.

Findings

The authors find that, apart from some positive effects, the dam has also brought negative environmental consequences, such as increased water pollution. The authors also find that farmers have responded to the changes by adapting their livelihood practices.

Research limitations/implications

The samples were relatively small, encompassing four communes in Ben Tre province. On the other hand, this case study is instructive to the many ongoing infrastructure projects in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta.

Social implications

The project have caused an increase in water-related social conflict.

Originality/value

The case of the Ba Lai dam provides a cautionary example for infrastructure-based water management plans, both in Viet Nam and more broadly. The study suggests the need to strengthen community participation and prioritize impacts of farmers' capital assets when constructing water management infrastructure for climate change adaptation.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Azwindini Isaac Ramaano

This study evaluates prospects of using ecotourism industry to advance community livelihoods in Musina Municipality, Limpopo, South Africa.

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1149

Abstract

Purpose

This study evaluates prospects of using ecotourism industry to advance community livelihoods in Musina Municipality, Limpopo, South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Using questionnaire surveys, interviews primarily, supplemented by focus group discussions and interviews, primary data has been collected reflective of the potentiality of ecotouristic activities in Musina Municipality. To a lesser extent, field observations contribute to these primary sources. Extra insights are obtained through documentary reviews (secondary sources). Data is analyzed using quantitative statistical techniques supplemented by qualitative approaches.

Findings

The study confirmed substantial ecotourism potential of the Musina Municipality and that this potential is manifest irrespective of geographic and demographic factors. However, the study reports a low current ecotourism impact in the Musina Municipality with consequential minimal benefits accruing to the enhancement of the standard of living in the local community. An inference is made that the key gap area impeding the realization of ecotourism potential in the Musina Municipality is the absence of a well-articulated tourism strategy linked to the sustainable economic development of the communities involved. Several fruitful initiatives for ecotourism consonant with local factor endowments are proposed.

Originality/value

Although, taken in topical isolation, matters of community livelihoods and sustainable development have been increasingly coming to the forefront of research on tourism, few studies have taken a holistic approach predicated on the integration of community livelihood and sustainable development roles of various forms of ecotourism in community development within many rural areas. This study represents the first case study employing an integrated approach to analyze ecotouristic potential of rural Musina Municipality, one of the driest areas in the far North of Limpopo Province, South Africa, characterized by low standard of living juxtaposed with high touristic potential.

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