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1 – 10 of 14
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Coralie Haller, Isabelle Hess-Misslin and Jean-Paul Mereaux

Several studies in management science have called for a better understanding of the experience economy approach to develop wine tourism. Few studies, however, have…

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies in management science have called for a better understanding of the experience economy approach to develop wine tourism. Few studies, however, have analysed experiential dimensions in the context of French wine-growing regions. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the difference between what wine tourism providers consider relevant in their market offer and what customers expect from their wine tourism experience. A new categorisation of wine tourists’ expectations based on Pine and Gilmore’s (1998) four realms model and Quadri-Felliti and Fiore’s model (2012) are developed.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology, qualitatively analysing 17 semi-structural interviews with the main wine tourism stakeholders in the Alsace region in north-east France and quantitatively analysing 233 questionnaires on wine tourists’ expectations and behaviours are adopted.

Findings

The study reveals a difference between experiential offers predicated on an educational approach and the explicit expectations of wine tourists (combining aesthetics, conviviality and authenticity, whose central focus is an encounter with the winemaker). Overall, the findings point to a need for greater inclusion of the experiential aspect in the offer designed for wine tourists.

Originality/value

The study identifies a gap between the educational dimension that professionals tend to promote in their offers and the real expectations of wine tourists who express more interest in the aesthetic dimension provided by an attractive visit environment and an enjoyable experience. At the heart of the authentic experience for wine tourists is meeting the winegrower, making authenticity a major factor.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Sylvie Lacoste and Keith Blois

This paper aims to incorporate material derived from four case study analyses of industrial business-to-business relationships. Although there is a substantial amount of…

1979

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to incorporate material derived from four case study analyses of industrial business-to-business relationships. Although there is a substantial amount of literature on the concept of power, there is little academic research studying the “perception” of power – especially that of key customers’ suppliers – relative to that of the buying company. This paper develops a framework, which provides a different set of perceptions regarding the nature of supplier-key customer relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The case studies involve four firms that have been long-term suppliers to a number of global industrial companies and who have set up key account programs to work with them. Three suppliers are in the corrugated cardboard industry (two large and one medium-sized company) and one supplier (a medium-sized company) is in the coding equipment industry.

Findings

The study develops a power framework, which can be used in the analysis of buyer/supplier power and points out the risk that can arise when one or more of the parties involved operates on the basis of perceptions that are incorrect.

Originality/value

The results suggest that the actors’ power perceptions are important constructs, which have so far been neglected in the academic literature, and stress the role of “subjectivity” in the actors’ analysis of power.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Cultural Rhythmics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-823-7

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Jens Blumrodt, Michel Desbordes and Dominique Bodin

The subject of CSR is nowadays widely discussed, as is its relevance to the sport entertainment industry. The objective of this research was to investigate corporate…

3585

Abstract

Purpose

The subject of CSR is nowadays widely discussed, as is its relevance to the sport entertainment industry. The objective of this research was to investigate corporate social responsibility (CSR) actions in the professional European football league and its impact on clubs’ brand image.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of this research discusses some particular points of the world's biggest sport entertainment, which is soccer. Then a definition of the meaning of CSR for this particular sector will be outlined. The CSR values adopted by sport clubs are observed in first division football in France. This approach has been combined with brand theories.

Findings

The specific research protocol evaluates consumers’ perceptions. The method which is developed measures and analyses the impact of CSR commitment on spectators’ brand perception. In linking CSR to brand image, two managerial viewpoints are discussed. CSR is synonymous with a company's social and ethical commitment. Brand theories outline the nature of brand equity. The authors apply these two complementary considerations to professional football clubs and argue that Keller's model of customer‐based brand equity has to be reconsidered for football clubs.

Practical implications

This research highlights that CSR has to become part of management strategies.

Originality/value

The authors draw attention to the argument that the professional sport entertainment industry requires a specific CSR management strategy which goes beyond the local level or the operational level of one single club. These clubs have to perform well in competition. But, as in no other industry, they have also to be “good” brands.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Hanene Oueslati, Martine Deparis and Saloua Bennaghmouch-Maire

The digitalization of an organization implies centralizing the data collected. Nevertheless, the management of customer data in franchise networks is a delicate…

Abstract

Purpose

The digitalization of an organization implies centralizing the data collected. Nevertheless, the management of customer data in franchise networks is a delicate, complicated and little studied issue. The purpose of this paper is to investigate its challenges and the keys to success, by developing a conceptual framework resulting from a qualitative study and a literature review.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was carried out with around 30 franchisors, franchisees and franchise experts in the light of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The results of the qualitative study helped to clarify our theoretical framework and to position ourselves on the side of the founding theories of relationship marketing. A research model was then defined and tested using a quantitative survey administered to a total sample of 192 franchisors and franchisees.

Findings

The results of the various studies show that relationship quality, through inter-organizational commitment, explains the achievement of marketing performance in franchise networks. In addition, the place of relationship quality depends on four essential variables: inter-organizational communication, franchisee autonomy, technical and human resources and contractualization of customer data management.

Originality/value

This study focuses on a topic that has received very little attention, particularly in franchise networks. It uses a mixed-methods design that has enabled the identification of key variables contributing to the achievement of marketing and sales performance in a data management context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2013

Juan Antonio Carrasco, Cristián Bustos and Beatriz Cid-Aguayo

Purpose — In the context of the study of the role of social networks in travel behavior, this chapter adds to that body of knowledge by presenting a new data collection…

Abstract

Purpose — In the context of the study of the role of social networks in travel behavior, this chapter adds to that body of knowledge by presenting a new data collection effort, which collects a wide array of information about the social, urban, and temporal context where social activity-travel behavior occurs.

Methodology/approach — The study was developed in Concepción, Chile, involving 240 respondents from four different urban contexts and their personal networks. The analysis concentrates on the challenges and opportunities of different techniques to build personal networks as a way of studying the social dimension of travel behavior. Although most of the current methods to study personal networks rely on emotional closeness, this approach may not be sufficient, since these “elicited” people may not include daily contacts that could be relevant to study social activities. Tackling this issue, the data instrument also collects those daily “revealed” people, on a two-day time use diary and a social activities listing. With this information, the chapter presents a comparative analysis between these “elicited” and “revealed” personal networks.

Findings — Overall, the results illustrate the dependence of the name generator technique on what is observed in terms of social activity-travel behavior, specifically on aspects such as personal network size, average distance, and frequencies of interaction. In addition, the comparison between the different methods to construct the personal networks, illustrates how name generators provide the opportunity to further understand transport related questions, such as the role of income and access to amenities on spatial and temporal patterns of social interactions, and their effect on social capital.

Details

Transport Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78-190288-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Franc¸oise Chevalier

Quality circles are a sign of the times, and their success provokes legitimate irritation for those confronted with their development. They often spark off controversy and…

720

Abstract

Quality circles are a sign of the times, and their success provokes legitimate irritation for those confronted with their development. They often spark off controversy and generate subjective points of view that denote a downright unwillingness to regard them fairly. What is the bottom line? Should quality circles be discontinued? Are they a means of zeroing in on total quality and, if so, how can the circles become fully integrated and contribute to instituting total quality? These issues are examined.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Sylvie M. Lacoste

The paper aims to investigate how business-to-business key accounts deal with the consequent tension between cooperation and competition, and how they can resolve that…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate how business-to-business key accounts deal with the consequent tension between cooperation and competition, and how they can resolve that relational paradox, using framework contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper argues that the role played by framework contracts can be ambivalent: as a tool to define cooperation with suppliers while simultaneously organising competition within suppliers, but by formalising such ambivalence, it does help to ease the tensions that may arise. To clarify such a conceptual and counter-intuitive ambivalence, the paper uses a case study that shows how framework contracts are used to solve the inherent tensions between cooperation with “preferred suppliers” and their price competition with invited “challengers”, in a competitive bidding situation.

Findings

This study is a first step in an investigation of the role of framework contracts in a customer-supplier relationship, aiming to explain their use as they highlight the “coopetitive” nature of the relationship, turning it into something tangible and psychologically acceptable.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the complexity of vertical “coopetition” and the research method adopted, the findings may not be generally applicable.

Practical implications

This research offers an enlarged perspective for suppliers as well as customers to think over their own relationships (in an industrial setting).

Originality/value

Little research has been conducted to date on vertical coopetition and the role and effects of framework contracts in the context of such complex customer-supplier relationships. This case study offers insights for practising managers and academics into the effective use of framework contracts.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Abstract

Details

Improving Flood Management, Prediction and Monitoring
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-552-4

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Wilfred H. Knol, Kristina Lauche, Roel L.J. Schouteten and Jannes Slomp

Building on the routine dynamics literature, this paper aims to expand our philosophical, practical and infrastructural understanding of implementing lean production. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the routine dynamics literature, this paper aims to expand our philosophical, practical and infrastructural understanding of implementing lean production. The authors provide a process view on the interplay between lean operating routines and continuous improvement (CI) routines and the roles of different actors in initiating and establishing these routines.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from interviews, observations and document analysis, retrospective comparative analyses of three embedded case studies on lean implementations provide a process understanding of enacting and patterning lean operating and CI routines in manufacturing SMEs.

Findings

Incorporating the “who” and “how” next to the “what” of practices and routines helps explain that rather than being implemented in isolation or even in conjunction with each other, sustainable lean practices and routines come about through team leader and employee enactment of the CI practices and routines. Neglecting these patterns aligned with unsustainable implementations.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed process model provides a valuable way to integrate variance and process streams of literature to better understand lean production implementations.

Practical implications

The process model helps manufacturing managers, policy makers, consultants and educators to reconsider their approach to implementing lean production or teaching how to do so.

Originality/value

Nuancing the existing lean implementation literature, the proposed process model shows that CI routines do not stem from implementing lean operating routines. Rather, the model highlights the importance of active engagement of actors at multiple organizational levels and strong connections between and across levels to change routines and work practices for implementing lean production.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 42 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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