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Article

Rajesh Chandrashekaran and Rajneesh Suri

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers evaluate identical price offers in retail versus e‐tail environments. Within that context, it seeks to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers evaluate identical price offers in retail versus e‐tail environments. Within that context, it seeks to examine the likelihood of shoppers to continue searching for a better price within the same channel and their intentions to transit to another channel.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 120 subjects provided information on gender and price knowledge and evaluated an advertised offer for a camera in one of two settings (retail or e‐tail). The offers in the two settings were identical in all respects. Then, subjects indicated the likelihood of finding a better price within the medium versus if they made a transition to a different medium.

Findings

Analysis reveals that consumers' evaluations and search behaviors are influenced by characteristics of the medium (retail versus e‐tail), but this effect is moderated by both gender and price knowledge. Females prefer a brick and mortar environment and are likely to seek information at such retailers, even when similar products are available online. However, males evaluate online offers better than identical store offers, and are less inclined to engage in channel transition. Finally, evaluations of online offers are positively related to price knowledge, whereas a reverse pattern of results is obtained for retail offers.

Originality/value

The findings shed light on how consumers evaluate identical online versus retail price offers, and their associated search intentions. These findings have practical implications for merchants who adopt a dual presence.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article

Murat Hakan Altıntaş, Serkan Kılıç and Can Efecan Akhan

There is an increased interest in e-tailing research in the literature, along with the development of new technologies and e-tailing platforms based on consumer and…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an increased interest in e-tailing research in the literature, along with the development of new technologies and e-tailing platforms based on consumer and industry perspective. The purpose of this paper is to examine the periodic changes within the content of e-tailing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The data set of this study includes academic papers cited in the Web of Science, which was published between 2000 and 2017. In this context, a co-word analysis was conducted using SciMat software based on the keywords, including “online retailing,” “e-tailing,” “e-store,” “online store,” “e-tail” and “online retail,” found in the titles of published academic articles.

Findings

In this study, three different periods of the e-tailing study field were examined, major and emerging themes for each period were determined with a comparative bibliometric analysis. In this regard, consumer acceptance, choice and satisfaction were found as the major themes in the conceptualization of e-tailing research.

Originality/value

Understanding the transition from traditional marketing channels to online channels is an essential factor for retailers as well as consumers’ use and the acceptance of new technologies. This study contributes to the effective execution of the e-tailing systems.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Rohit Titiyal, Sujoy Bhattacharya and Jitesh J. Thakkar

The purpose of this paper is to apply a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) framework to evaluate distribution strategies for an e-tailer. An application of MCDM method…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) framework to evaluate distribution strategies for an e-tailer. An application of MCDM method, the hybrid DANP–VIseKriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR) model, is used for e-tailers’ distribution strategy evaluation. The choice of distribution strategies under various dimensions is evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a hybrid MCDM model to solve the decision-making framework, which combines Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL), DEMATEL-based analytic network process and VIKOR method. Data were collected from the experts (e-tail manager, logistics manager, operations manager and distribution center (DC) manager) using two questionnaires, first for the influential relationship among the criteria and dimensions and second for a performance rating of each alternative (distribution strategies) against each criterion.

Findings

DANP with VIKOR method prioritizes the distribution strategies in the following order: DC shipment, drop shipment, click and collect, store shipment and click and reserve. Performance gap was calculated based on the VIKOR method to provide distribution strategies to an e-tailer under different situations. The authors infer that in developing country, product characteristics and transportation have a major influence on deciding the distribution strategy.

Practical implications

Decision-making framework will provide e-tail mangers a knowledge-based understanding to select the distribution strategy under the different situations related to the performance, product, e-tailer and external characteristics for smooth order fulfillment process. The insights developed by this research provide a framework for rational decision making in distribution strategy selection in e-business.

Originality/value

This is the first kind of a study which offers a decision framework for e-tail managers on how to choose distribution strategies under different situations which are related to the performance, product, e-tailer and external characteristics.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article

Anjala S. Krishen, Sheen Kachen, Michael Kraussman and Zeenath Haniff

This study aims to explore consumers’ motivations in the adoption of either print or digital forms of media, given the fluctuation of trends and attitudes in magazine…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore consumers’ motivations in the adoption of either print or digital forms of media, given the fluctuation of trends and attitudes in magazine consumption in the USA. This paper utilizes cognitive lock-in and the power law of practice to further the understanding of digital adoption through an interdisciplinary lens.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, initially, five focus group sessions, including 53 qualifying non-student participants randomly placed into groups of 10 or 11, were held. Next, a 2 × 2 between-subjects quasi-experiment, using 163 undergraduate students at a large public university, was conducted.

Findings

The findings show that although the digital medium is considered less expensive, more convenient and more environmentally friendly, the print medium is regarded as more familiar, personal and visual. Further, whether the media type is a book or a magazine, consumers report higher perceived value, hedonic value and attitude toward print versus digital media.

Practical implications

The potential to digitally attract and lock-in consumers in the media industry has immense implications. Individuals consume media because of fashion marketing, personal space and advertisements, among other reasons.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to existing research by uncovering qualitative and quantitative insights into media consumption through a multilayered analysis of focus group participants and a quantitative experiment. The findings indicate that both the power law of practice theory and cognitive lock-in are plausible explanations for the choice of print over digital media format.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Sajad Rezaei, Muslim Amin and Wan Khairuzzaman Wan Ismail

Prior studies mostly investigate initial shopping intention in developed countries. The purpose of this paper is to sketch and determine the impact of perceived usefulness…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies mostly investigate initial shopping intention in developed countries. The purpose of this paper is to sketch and determine the impact of perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PEOU), perceived value (PV), trust (TRT), perceived risk (PR), privacy concern (PC), internet literacy (IL), satisfaction (SAT) on online repatronage intention (ORI) among Malaysian experienced online shoppers.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 219 valid questionnaires were collected via an online survey among experienced online shoppers across young and old students aged 18-31. Subsequently, the two-step structural equation modelling (SEM) technique was employed to empirically examine the proposed integrative theoretical research framework and model fit with maximum likelihood estimation.

Findings

The statistical analyses support the relationships between PU, PV, TRT and SAT with ORI while the relationships between PEOU, PR, PC and IL with ORI were rejected in which all the factors affecting ORI occur similarly across the study sample. The behaviour of experienced online shoppers was found to be different from findings of previous literature that examined initial adoption and intention. Due to the lack of distinction in the literature concerning experienced and inexperienced shoppers, our results show inconsistencies with prior research in examining ORI.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests that future research consider multicultural analysis, atmosphere design, developing internet methodology and the role of flow experience in determining ORI. The research limitations and implications are also discussed.

Practical implications

By realizing the differences between inexperienced shoppers and experienced shoppers, online retailers should segment these groups more effectively and should implement a different marketing strategy to target the right segment, right shoppers along with the right marketing tactic. The antecedents of future intention of online shopping are influenced by various variables because the human behaviour is sophisticated in nature. Thus, academicians and practitioners should realize the implications of examining their target population/market based on an assessment of different antecedents.

Originality/value

This study is among the few attempts to examine attitudes and behaviour of Malaysian experienced online shoppers who have formed relevant experiences and skills in online shopping. Additionally, the paper empirically examine and distinct user perception of online retail attributes (including PU, PEOU, PV and PR), pre-purchase user attitudes (including TRT, PC, IL) and post-purchase users attitudes (including SAT) in forming ORI simultaneously.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

David M. Hardesty and Tracy A. Suter

The focus and intended contribution of this research are to understand better how retailers should strategically present external reference price information varying in…

Abstract

Purpose

The focus and intended contribution of this research are to understand better how retailers should strategically present external reference price information varying in the context from which it originates (online vs bricks and mortar).

Design/methodology/approach

A two reference price environment (online e‐tail, bricks‐and‐mortar retail) × two external reference price ($252.99, low; $379.99, high) between subjects experimental design with a single control condition was employed.

Findings

Results from an experimental study provide empirical support, suggesting that consumers expect to pay less in online e‐tail settings than bricks‐and‐mortar retail settings. Additionally, results suggest that bricks‐and‐mortar retail external reference prices influence consumer e‐tail price expectations, price fairness, and satisfaction perceptions more than online e‐tail external reference prices when reference prices are high. When external reference prices are low, both online e‐tail and bricks‐and‐mortar retail external reference prices are equally effective.

Research limitations/implications

Price setters should use bricks‐and‐mortar external reference prices when the external reference price is high, as consumers are impacted positively by these reference prices.

Practical implications

The research results suggest a time to use bricks‐and‐mortar external reference prices and suggest that online external reference prices have similar impact regardless of the size of the external reference price.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its kind to evaluate the impact of the context of the reference price on consumer evaluations.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article

Riccardo Mangiaracina, Gino Marchet, Sara Perotti and Angela Tumino

Given the importance of logistics operations in business-to-consumer (B2C) e-commerce and growing interest in the related environmental effects, the purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the importance of logistics operations in business-to-consumer (B2C) e-commerce and growing interest in the related environmental effects, the purpose of this paper is to offer an up-to-date literature review on the topic of B2C e-commerce environmental sustainability, specifically from a logistics perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis focussed on a set of 56 papers published from 2001 to 2014 in 38 peer-reviewed international journals. The papers were analyzed and categorized according to the main features of the paper, the research method(s) adopted and the themes tackled.

Findings

There is a growing interest in sustainability issues. In the last 14 years, the focus has progressively shifted from the mere identification of the wide-ranging environmental effects of e-commerce to the need for a quantitative evaluation of their impact, although much remains to be done in this regard. Some industries, such as books and grocery, have largely been addressed, however, promising sectors in the e-commerce field, such as clothing and consumer electronics, have only been considered to a certain degree. Moreover, despite the emerging role of multichannel strategies, the environmental implications of the related logistics activities have not yet been studied in detail.

Originality/value

B2C e-commerce has grown in popularity, and its environmental implications are currently of key interest. This paper contributes to the understanding of the existing body of knowledge on this topic, presenting an up-to-date classification of articles and highlighting themes for further research activities. From a managerial perspective, this paper helps supply chain managers develop a clear understanding of both the logistics areas with the most impact on environmental sustainability and the KPIs used to quantify the environmental implications of e-commerce logistics operations comprehensively and effectively.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

Lukas P. Forbes, Scott W. Kelley and K. Douglas Hoffman

The authors propose focusing on e‐commerce service failure and recovery through the presentation of failure and recovery strategies employed by e‐commerce service firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors propose focusing on e‐commerce service failure and recovery through the presentation of failure and recovery strategies employed by e‐commerce service firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ the critical incident technique using 377 customer responses to present ten e‐tail failures and 11 e‐tail recovery strategies used by e‐commerce service firms. The authors also present data on post‐recovery satisfaction levels and propensity to switch behavior.

Findings

Findings indicate that: e‐tail customers experience different types of service failure relative to traditional retail settings; e‐tail firms employ a different series of recovery strategies relative to traditional retail settings; and post‐recovery switching by e‐tail customers can be high even with satisfying experiences.

Originality/value

This paper strengthens the existing failure and recovery literature by presenting data on the largest growing sector of the service industry. These findings will have value to traditional firms looking to expand to e‐commerce channels in addition to e‐commerce firms currently experiencing customer dissatisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Lukas P. Forbes

This paper aims to focus on non‐internet‐based self‐service technologies through the presentation of failure and recovery strategies employed by service firms using…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on non‐internet‐based self‐service technologies through the presentation of failure and recovery strategies employed by service firms using self‐service forms of interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs the critical incident technique using 508 customer responses to present nine failures and nine recovery strategies used by self‐service technology firms. It presents data on post‐recovery satisfaction levels and propensity to switch behavior. The paper also compares findings in the non‐internet self‐service technology context to findings from e‐tail and bricks and mortar settings.

Findings

Findings indicate that: non‐internet self‐service technology customers experience different types of service failure relative to traditional retail and e‐tail settings; non‐internet self‐service technology firms employ a different series of recovery strategies relative to traditional retail and e‐tail settings; and post‐recovery switching by customers can be high even with satisfying experiences.

Originality/value

This paper strengthens the existing failure and recovery literature by presenting data on the largest growing sector of the service industry, self‐service technologies, and the largest sector within self‐service technologies (non‐internet purchases). These findings will have value to traditional firms looking to expand to their channels in addition to firms currently experiencing customer dissatisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Charles F. Hofacker

The purpose of this paper is to reveal how mental models inherited from offline retailing have impeded both the theory and practice of online retailing, and to suggest…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal how mental models inherited from offline retailing have impeded both the theory and practice of online retailing, and to suggest fruitful areas of research in online retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

The mental models of physical retail suggest physical constraints of various sorts, and yet for the most part, the constraints acting upon the e‐tailer are instead logical, symbolic and cognitive.

Findings

Researchers in e‐tailing could benefit from pursuing a set of interesting issues including assortment, customer‐to‐customer value creation, site design and structure, and the importance of network topology.

Research limitations/implications

There are many new topics in retailing that can be explored by marketers, as long as we are willing to jettison some of our cherished terminology and ways of thinking. In effect, online, the retailing mix becomes human‐centric, rather than focusing on physical components.

Practical implications

The skill sets needed to set up an e‐tailing presence are substantially different than those required for offline retailing.

Originality/value

The paper takes an unconventional view of the retailing literature, literature that goes back to the foundation of marketing as an academic discipline.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Keywords

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