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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Alessandro Sancino, James Rees and Irene Schindele

This book chapter uses structuration theory and aims to study cross-sectoral collaborations for co-creating public value and their implications in terms of the role and

Abstract

This book chapter uses structuration theory and aims to study cross-sectoral collaborations for co-creating public value and their implications in terms of the role and the relationships of the public sector with the private and third sector.

Our research is exploratory and our main research question is: What are the modalities of structuration of cross-sectoral collaborations for co-creating public value? Our analysis is based on a multiple case study analyses conducted in the region of Trentino – South Tyrol (Italy), and it draws on primary and secondary data collected through six extensive semi-structured interviews and documentary analysis on about fifty organizations participating in six cross-sectoral collaborations. We found that the co-creation of public value led public organizations to structure cross-sectoral collaborations involving private and third-sector organizations, but preexistent structures of signification, domination, and legitimation hampered the public sector as a whole to fully democratically meta-govern the modalities of structuration.

The chapter provides insights for practice by highlighting the elements of structuration theory as a useful framework of analysis for decision-making of public managers involved in cross-sectoral collaborations. Research implications deal with using structuration theory and critical approaches at a macrolevel (e.g., the role of the public sector as a whole) within public management studies.

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Elvira Kaneberg

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the management of commercial actors in strategic networks of emergency preparedness management (EPM) in developed countries and how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the management of commercial actors in strategic networks of emergency preparedness management (EPM) in developed countries and how these strategies connect to the emergency response efficiency. This study uses collaboration, strategy, and efficiency to evaluate the private governance of the food, healthcare, and transportation sectors and follows an analysis of these sectors’ management that finds an ambivalent impact on the efficiency of the worldwide supply chain network (SCN) system. This study discusses many strategic networks and nets of commercial standards with different management structures and emphasizes illustrating the EPM context, thereby offering directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical research approach and triangulation methodology was adopted to design the selection, evaluation, and contribution of the observed data and the humanitarian and business literature. An overview of strategic networks’ role in EPM in Sweden comprises several network approaches and considers the strategic value of three SCNs for response efficiency.

Findings

The study finds that strategic networks are relevant for EPM and response efficiency and can be delimited and adapted to developing countries’ demands. However, growing interest in networks’ strategic value for EPM stresses public-private collaboration as a strategic choice to achieve response efficiency. To offer strategic planning that ties demand with supply, public-private actors must collaborate in SCNs.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature on strategic networks, for example, industrial networks, by illustrating their strategic value for developed countries’ SCNs. It also contributes to the business literature, for example, on strategic net management. The work is original because it adopts a practical perspective involving buyers and suppliers in planning, the delimitation of their capability in nets, and the strategic value of SCN collaboration.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Krichelle Medel, Rehana Kousar and Tariq Masood

The increasing risk of natural disasters is challenging humanitarian actors to create resilient disaster management systems. However, the role of the private sector in…

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing risk of natural disasters is challenging humanitarian actors to create resilient disaster management systems. However, the role of the private sector in disaster management operations (DMOs) is not as prominent as the role played by (inter)governmental agencies. This article aims to investigate the relationship of collaboration and resilience in disaster management supply networks (DMSNs).

Design/methodology/approach

Supply network resilience criteria were defined as robustness, flexibility, velocity and visibility based on the literature review. DMSN capabilities were identified characterising each resilience criterion through the development of the Collaboration–Resilience (COLRES) Analysis Framework for DMSNs. This theoretical model was then applied to an empirical case study in the Philippines using semi-structured interviews for data gathering.

Findings

A total of 46 cross-sector collaboration activities were identified across four disaster management phases and linked to the resilience criteria. A causal analysis of each collaboration activity and its outcome was conducted to identify relationships between collaboration types and resilience constructs. Based on these results, patterns were identified, and dependencies between collaboration and resilience were defined. Collective DMSN resilience (DMSNRES) enabled by existing cross-sector collaboration activities was evaluated against a future disaster scenario to identify resilience gaps. These gaps were used to recognise new cross-sector collaboration opportunities, thereby illustrating the continuous process of resilience building.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides new insights on how private sector is involved within a DMOs through collaboration with the government and other NGOs. It augments existing literature on private sector involvement in DMOs where common perception is that the sector is only involved in short-term response and recovery activities. This study finds that the private sector can be operationally involved not just in post-disaster activities, but also in mitigation and preparation phases as well. This then sets a new baseline for further research on private sector involvement within DMOs. As this study provided a novel framework to analyse collaboration activities and its impact to DMSN resilience, future work could be done by applying the model to further cases such as other countries'. DMSNs, or to more specific contexts such as inter-organisational collaborations rather than big sectors. A more detailed assessment method against a future disaster will prove relevance for the model in providing practical insights on how resilience can be built in DMSNs.

Practical implications

This research proposed a novel DMSN collaboration-resilience (COLRES) model (Figure 11) to analyse existing processes in preparation for specific disasters. Practitioners may be able to use this model with the goal of identifying resilience gaps to fill and continuously improve their processes. The model also provides practitioners the lens to improve processes with the perspective on collaboration to complement government and NGO efforts and expertise with those of the private sector. For the private sector perspective, this research provides new insights on how they can be more involved with the community to provide more sustainable and long-term contributions to the society.

Social implications

With disasters becoming more complex and frequent by the day and as humanitarian actors focus on improving their expertise, the need for every piece of the society to contribute to disaster risk reduction is continuously intensified. This research shows that each sector of the society can take part in disaster management operations to reduce unpredictability, lives impacted and increase speed of response and recovery. Each sector of the society can be of great contribution not only during post-disaster response and recovery but also during pre-disaster mitigation and preparedness phase. As such, this research echoes the call for everyone to be involved in disaster risk reduction and mitigation as a way of life.

Originality/value

This research ultimately finds that cross-sector collaboration builds resilience in DMSNs through capacity building, redundancy sourcing, information reliability and logistics responsiveness. This study shows that the private sector is able to go beyond existing short-term partnerships by participating in the 46 collaboration activities identified across four disaster management phases in order to build resilience in DMSNs.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Janine Stiles and Paul Williams

This chapter compares the literature on public and private sector collaboration and considers the implications for success in collaborative relationships between the…

Abstract

This chapter compares the literature on public and private sector collaboration and considers the implications for success in collaborative relationships between the sectors. It highlights key comparative drivers of intent for both types of organization, explores the relationship between them, and proposes a framework for primary investigation based on the relationship between the key areas of competitive positioning and level of risk. A case study analysis of two complex strategic partnership initiatives in Wales,1 both involving collaboration between local health boards, local authorities, health trusts and other statutory, voluntary and private sector stakeholders is then used to illustrate the complexity of successfully managing relationships in this context.

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Julinda Hoxha

This chapter examines factors that maximize collaboration among various stakeholders with the purpose of health policy making in Turkey. The field research reveals that…

Abstract

This chapter examines factors that maximize collaboration among various stakeholders with the purpose of health policy making in Turkey. The field research reveals that policy networks have been formed in the sub-areas of public health, healthcare construction, and health tourism in the years between 2011 and 2015. Content analysis of 24 semi-structured interviews with policy and professional experts is conducted to assess Network Collaborative Capacity, built upon three dimensions, namely, structural, relational, and institutional. The findings reveal that networks differ in their capacity to collaborate as well as their impact on policy making resulting in three distinct models of network policy making. In the cases under investigation, network impact takes the form of (a) policy innovation through expertise sharing and evidence-based policy making associated with particularly high levels of relational capacity; (b) policy effectiveness through contract enforcement within a clear legal framework associated with particularly high levels of institutional capacity; and (c) policy coherence through organizational-knowledge-sharing and actor coordination. Findings also suggest that institutionalization in the form of network embeddedness in the surrounding political and economic environment is crucial for maintaining a collaborative momentum as well as achieving policy effectiveness at the stage of policy implementation. Based on these findings, further studies should focus on the institutionalization of policy networks, particularly in those middle-income countries such as Turkey that aim and often fail to address various policy challenges through short-lived practices of multi-stakeholder action. Finally, this study emphasizes the importance of incorporating neo-institutional approaches to network analysis.

Details

Network Policy Making within the Turkish Health Sector: Becoming Collaborative
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-095-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Giulia Nardelli, Jesper Ole Jensen and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

The purpose of this article is to investigate how facilities management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate how facilities management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public collaborative innovation within the context of FM. The driving motivation is to inform and inspire internal FM units of local institutions on how to navigate and manage collaboration of different, intra- and inter-organisational actors throughout ESCO projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A deductive research methodology was applied based on the first ten ESCO projects in Danish municipalities between 2008 and 2012.

Findings

A model of FM roles in FM public innovation is proposed. The internal FM unit coordinates between clients and end users by acting as translator and demonstrator and collaborates with the ESCO company to implement the energy renovation (FM processor).

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected from a limited sample of ESCO collaborations in Denmark. Future research should thus investigate collaborative innovation in ESCO (and other forms of privatepublic) collaborations outside of Denmark.

Practical implications

Not only should FM units clarify what different stakeholders expect from an ESCO collaboration, but also they should translate stakeholders’ expectations into actual goals and objectives; process them together with the ESCO company; demonstrate their execution to all stakeholders throughout the process, not just when closing the collaboration.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to FM innovation research by exploring FM innovation in the public sector and by depicting the coordinating role of local governments’ internal FM units engaging in publicprivate collaborative innovation.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Loai Ali Zeenalabden Ali Alsaid

This study seeks to explore the powerful role(s) of institutionalised performance measurement systems or metrics in smart city governance in a politically and militarily…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the powerful role(s) of institutionalised performance measurement systems or metrics in smart city governance in a politically and militarily sensitive developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study extends the application and contribution of a multi-level institutional framework to previous management accounting literature on the potential relationship between performance measurement and smart city governance. The value of utilising a multi-level framework is to broaden and deepen theoretical analyses about this relationship to include the effect of political pressure from the military regime at the macro level on the institutionalisation of a performance measurement system at the micro-organisational level. Taking the New Cairo city council smart electricity networks project (Egypt) as an interpretive qualitative single-case study, data collection methods included semi-structured interviews, direct observations and documentary readings.

Findings

Performance measurement systems or metrics, especially in politically and militarily sensitive smart cities, constitutes a process of cascading (macro-micro) institutionalisation that is closely linked to sustainable developments taking place in the wider arena of urban policies. Going a step further, accounting-based performance metrics, arising from political and military pressures towards public-private collaborations, contribute to smart city management and accountability (governance). Institutionalised measurement systems or performance metrics play a powerful accounting role(s) in shaping and reshaping political decisions and military actions in the city council.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this study goes beyond the cascading institutionalisation process by arguing for the powerful role(s) of institutionalised accounting and performance measurement systems in smart city decision-making and governance. Empirically, it enriches previous literature with a case study of a developing Arab Spring country, characterised by an emerging economy, political sensitivity and military engagement, rather than developed and more stable countries that have been thoroughly investigated. It is also among the first politically engaged accounting case studies to highlight public-private collaborations as a recent reform in public sector governance and accountability.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Janne Sinisammal, Pekka Leviäkangas, Tommi Autio and Elina Hyrkäs

– The purpose of this paper is to probe experiences of entrepreneurs in the social and health care service provision.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to probe experiences of entrepreneurs in the social and health care service provision.

Design/methodology/approach

Information was collected regarding entrepreneurs’ views on the factors affecting the collaboration between public and private sectors. A sample of social and health care entrepreneurs was interviewed using open-ended questions. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using inductive content analysis.

Findings

Three main categories of factors affecting the success of partnership were identified: the nature of partnership, business aspects and tension builders.

Research limitations/implications

The research was undertaken in rural Finland and the sample consisted 13 entrepreneurs. The results must be considered as observations with more generalised conclusions.

Practical implications

The results of this study support municipalities in their social and health care service strategy work and especially in consideration of how to also facilitate a fruitful public-private partnership (PPP)-framework, which will largely depend on mutual understanding and consensus.

Originality/value

The reform of the social and health care system has raised intensive public debate throughout Europe. Key issues include the reorganising of social and health care processes as well as PPPs in provision of services. This study observes the views and experiences of private entrepreneurs and points out where some potential problems and solutions of social and health care PPPs are.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Jeffrey Avina

The paper's aim is to demonstrate how organizations related to public security and safety can more effectively partner with private sector companies under the rubric of…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to demonstrate how organizations related to public security and safety can more effectively partner with private sector companies under the rubric of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of actual cases of collaboration between such bodies and the private sector informs a suggested engagement approach.

Findings

A structured approach of engagement to the private sector for CSR support is possible if public safety entities understand how to effectively involve private sector organizations in their work. This includes clear tangible asks with demonstrable returns and an eye to understanding what effective CSR encompasses from an outcome perspective but also from the perspective of what drives the private sector to engage in CSR.

Practical implications

The paper lays out a point‐by‐point engagement strategy which could increase publicprivate partnerships in the public safety arena.

Social implications

This paper is a clear indication of how and where public sector engagement with the private sector in areas of security are a win‐win combination and augment public security and the effectiveness of both public and private sector bodies concerned with this outcome.

Originality/value

This paper lays out in a clear and novel way a “how to” guide for effective engagement with the private sector to public bodies with a relatively limited experiential base for this form of engagement. It offers a means to significantly expand this form of collaboration to the benefit of society overall.

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Tímea Beatrice Dóra and Zsuzsanna Szalkai

This paper aims to investigate the dyadic relationships of actors engaged in publicprivate (P-P) collaboration in health-care prevention. The purpose is to characterize a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the dyadic relationships of actors engaged in publicprivate (P-P) collaboration in health-care prevention. The purpose is to characterize a new type of actor as an intermediary that connects different actors in P-P collaboration and to compare P-P collaboration based on results expected with and without the inclusion of this new actor.

Design/methodology/approach

For the investigation, the Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Group approach to business relationships is used. The substance (activities-resources-actors) and the functions (dyadic, single actor and network) of business relationships are applied as a research framework. The analysis is based on these theories through a case study.

Findings

This study delivers four important findings: the relationship with this new type of actor results in new resources for all of the participants that are involved, the new actor is a key channel for generating corporate social responsibility recommendations for private actors, relationships with this new type of actor are a great basis on which private firms may build relationships with the public that involve higher levels of health care and also generate sponsorship for public causes, thereby increasing social welfare and the new type of actor can cause potential tensions that require constant and coordinated management.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the conceptualization of the “interacted actor” through characterizing a new type of actor and its renewing network in P-P collaboration.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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