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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2010

Carla Hertleer, Lieva Van Langenhove and Hendrik Rogier

The need for textile-based antennas originates from the development of smart textile systems that emerged in the nineties. The aim is to increase the functionality of…

Abstract

The need for textile-based antennas originates from the development of smart textile systems that emerged in the nineties. The aim is to increase the functionality of textiles, in most cases, clothing, by adding electronic systems. This allows the monitoring of physical (such as heart or respiration rate) as well as environmental (such as humidity or temperature) parameters through an embedded sensor network. The availability of micro electronics on the one hand, and new textile materials on the other, stimulates this evolution. The development of integratable textile-based sensors and flexible interconnections is continuously ongoing research. Also, wireless data transfer from the garment to a nearby base-station requires new developments, especially when the flexibility and comfort of the garment needs to be preserved. This paper gives a detailed overview on performed research and reveals the feasibility, design and manufacturing process of textile-based antennas for this off-body communication. The antennas are low profile, breathable, light-weight and simple in structure which make them suitable to be unobtrusively embedded in apparel and provide flexibility and satisfactory performance.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Minyoung Suh, Katherine E. Carroll, Edward Grant and William Oxenham

This research investigated the feasibility of using an inductively coupled antenna as the basis of applying a systems approach to smart clothing. In order to simulate…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigated the feasibility of using an inductively coupled antenna as the basis of applying a systems approach to smart clothing. In order to simulate real-life situations, the impact of the distortions and relative displacement of different fabric layers (with affixed antennas) on the signal quality was assessed. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A spiral antenna was printed on different fabric substrates. Obstructive conditions of the inductively coupled fabric layers were investigated to find out how much influence these conditions had on transmission performance. Reflected signals and transmitted signals were observed, while fabric antennas were subjected to displacement (distance and dislocation) or deformation (stretching and bending). The threshold of physical obstacles was estimated based on statistical analyses.

Findings

The limits of physical conditions that enable proper wireless transmission were estimated up to ∼2 cm for both distance and dislocation, and ∼0.24 K for bending deformation. The antenna performance remained within an acceptable level of 20 percent transmission up to 10 percent fabric stretch. Based on well-established performance metrics used in clothing environment on the body, which employs 2-5 cm of ease, the results imply that the inductively coupled antennas may be suitable for use in smart clothing.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates that the use of inductively coupled antennas on multiple clothing layers could offer the basis of a new “wireless” system approach to smart clothing. This would not only result in performance benefits, but would also significantly improve the aesthetics of smart clothing which should result in new markets for such products.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Łukasz Januszkiewicz and Sławomir Hausman

The purpose of this paper is to compare the properties of simplified physical and corresponding numerical human body models (phantoms) and verify their applicability to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the properties of simplified physical and corresponding numerical human body models (phantoms) and verify their applicability to path loss modeling in narrowband and ultra-wideband on-body wireless body area networks (WBANs). One of the models has been proposed by the authors.

Design/methodology/approach

Two simplified numerical and two physical phantoms for body area network on-body channel computer simulation and field measurement results are presented and compared.

Findings

Computer simulations and measurements which were carried out for the proposed simplified six-cylinder model with various antenna locations lead to the general conclusion that the proposed phantom can be successfully used for experimental investigation and testing of on-body WBANs both in ISM and UWB IEEE 802.15.6 frequency bands.

Research limitations/implications

Usage of the proposed phantoms for the simulation/measurement of the specific absorption rate and for off-body channels are not within the scope of this paper.

Practical implications

The proposed simplified phantom can be easily made with a low cost in other laboratories and be used both for research and development of WBAN technologies. The model is most suitable for wearable antenna radiation pattern simulation and measurement.

Social implications

Presented results facilitate applications of WBANs in medicine and health monitoring.

Originality/value

A new six-cylinder phantom has been proposed. The proposed simplified phantom can be easily made with a low cost in other laboratories and be used both for research and development of WBAN technologies.

Details

COMPEL: The International Journal for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Zhongcheng Gui, Yongjun Deng, Zhongxi Sheng, Tangjie Xiao, Yonglong Li, Fan Zhang, Na Dong and Jiandong Wu

This paper aims to present a new intelligent wall-climbing welding robot system for large-scale steel structure manufacture, which is composed of robot body, control…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a new intelligent wall-climbing welding robot system for large-scale steel structure manufacture, which is composed of robot body, control system and welding system.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors design the robot system according to application requirements, validate the design through simulation and experiments and use the robot in actual production.

Findings

Experimental results show that the robot system satisfies the demands of automatic welding of large-scale ferromagnetic structure, which contributes much to on-site manufacturing of such structures.

Practical implications

The robot can work with better quality and efficiency compared with manual welding and other semi-automatic welding devices, which can much improve large-scale steel structure manufacturing.

Originality/value

The robot system is a novel solution for large-scale steel structures welding. There are three major advantages: the robot body with reliable adsorption ability, large payload capability and good mobility which meet the requirements of welding; the control system with good welding seam tracking accuracy and intelligent automatic welding ability; and friendly human – computer interface which makes the robot easy to use.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Martin Fojt

That someone can make you feel good is a quality in itself. There has been much talk within British government circles, for example, about “the feel‐goodfactor”, which is…

Abstract

That someone can make you feel good is a quality in itself. There has been much talk within British government circles, for example, about “the feel‐good factor”, which is constantly reminding us that it is just around the corner! Whether or not we can believe in this is another matter, but it certainly displays an awareness that making other people feel good can have positive benefits for you also. How this can be achieved will differ depending on your particular line of business. Having a good quality product does not in itself guarantee success as service quality must also be taken into account. This is where the feel‐good factor comes into play. It is all very well, for example, going to a restaurant to have a top‐class meal (in that the food was good), only to have it thrown at you. Quality, therefore, must not be seen as a separate entity, but more as a package deal.

Details

Library Review, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Rachael Addicott

The aim of this paper is to show that there has been an increasing focus on networks as a model of service delivery and governance in the UK public sector. As an early…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to show that there has been an increasing focus on networks as a model of service delivery and governance in the UK public sector. As an early example, managed clinical networks for cancer were initially considered to represent an ideological move towards a softer model of governance, with an emphasis on moving across the vertical lines that were strengthened or established during the new public management (NPM) movement of the 1990s. The NPM ideology of the 1990s emphasised the role of Boards and powerful non‐executives in governing public services. This paper seeks to explore the role of the Board in the UK health sector under the apparent emerging “post‐NPM” ideological framework of accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on findings from five comparative case studies of managed clinical networks for cancer in London.

Findings

The paper finds that cancer network boards have had limited strategic influence as these networks are constrained by a continued emphasis of centralised performance management and structural reconfiguration, which become dominant during the NPM era.

Practical implications

The inability of the post‐NPM governance ideology to make a significant impact in the UK, and the resulting confused and conflictual framework, have hindered the initial intention of cancer networks as a forum for spreading best practice across organisational boundaries.

Originality/value

There is only limited research on the emergent remit, structure or strategy of public sector Boards in the UK, and very limited research on the role of Boards in health care networks: the paper provides some illumination on this limited area of study.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Svetoslav Zabunov, Garo Mardirossian and Katia Strelnitski

The current manuscript aims to propose a novel multirotor design.

Abstract

Purpose

The current manuscript aims to propose a novel multirotor design.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a novel 16-rotor multicopter design named Emerald. The novel design innovations and benefits are disclosed. Comparison to existing 16-rotor designs is carried out. Implementation areas where the novel idea shall yield benefit are discussed. A prototype of the presented design is described.

Findings

The herein proposed 16-rotor design has a number of benefits over existing 16-rotor multicopters. The paper elaborates on those advantages.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to prototype testing, as the presented design is a novel concept.

Practical implications

The motivation to research and develop this novel design is implementing the vehicle for stereoscopic photography and reconnaissance. The design is also applicable to carrying payloads while flying indoors.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 93 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Kabini Sanga and Martyn Reynolds

This chapter offers a selective review of the emerging Indigenous Pacific educational research from 2000 to 2018. The Pacific region is home to many and various cultural…

Abstract

This chapter offers a selective review of the emerging Indigenous Pacific educational research from 2000 to 2018. The Pacific region is home to many and various cultural groups, and this review is an opportunity to celebrate the consequent diversity of thought about education. Common threads are used to weave this diversity into a set of coherent regional patterns. Such threads include the regional value to educational research of local metaphor, and an emphasis on relationality or the state of being related as a cornerstone of education, both in research and as practice. The relationship between indigenous educational thought and formal education in indigenous contexts is also addressed. The review pays attention to educational research centered in home islands and that which focuses on the education of those from Pacific Islands in settler societies since connections across the ocean are strong. Because of the recent history of the region, developments are fast paced and ongoing, and this chapter concludes with a sketch of research at the frontier. Set within the context of an area study, the chapter concludes by suggesting what challenges the region has to offer in terms of re-thinking the field of international and comparative education.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2019
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-724-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Catriona O’Toole and Venka Simovska

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the functioning of education systems in a multitude of ways. In Ireland schools closed on March 12th and remained closed for the…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the functioning of education systems in a multitude of ways. In Ireland schools closed on March 12th and remained closed for the remainder of the academic year. During this time educators engaged with students, families and colleagues in new and diverse ways. The purpose of this study was to explore educators' experiences during the closures, particularly regarding the impact of the pandemic on the wellbeing of students, school staff and wider school communities.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of one-to-one interviews, lasting approximately one hour, were conducted in July 2020 with 15 education professionals online via Zoom or Microsoft Teams. Participants occupied various roles (classroom teacher, school leader, special educational needs coordinator, etc.) and worked in a diverse range of communities in Ireland. Qualitative data from interviews were transcribed and emergent themes identified through an inductive followed by deductive analytic approach.

Findings

The interviews highlighted the central role that schools play in supporting their local communities and the value teachers place on their relationships with students and families. Many teachers and school leaders found themselves grappling with new identities and professional boundaries as they worked to support, care for and connect with the students and families they serve. There was considerable concern expressed regarding the plight of vulnerable or marginalised students for whom the school ordinarily offered a place of safety and security.

Originality/value

The findings reveal how COVID-19 has exacerbated pre-existing inequalities and the central role of schools in promoting the health and wellbeing of all its members.

Details

Health Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Ingemar Karlsson and Sven‐Åke Christianson

Investigates situations that were perceived as stressful by Swedish police officers and the kind of support and help they had received in connection with that. A total of…

Abstract

Investigates situations that were perceived as stressful by Swedish police officers and the kind of support and help they had received in connection with that. A total of 162 respondents took part in the study. Results show that most of the traumatic experiences reported by police officers occurred early on in their careers. The traumatic experiences often remained in their memories in the form of visual, tactile, and olfactory sensations. A variety of stress reactions were described in connection with these experiences. As regards ways of working through the traumatic experiences, more than half reported that it helped them to talk about the event with their colleagues. Only a few had been offered debriefing or professional help in connection with the event. A notable finding is that the majority of the officers did not receive any support at all from their superiors in connection with the event.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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