Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Omar A. Alhaj, Ara D. Kanekanian and Adrian C. Peters

The main aim of this study is to investigate the whey protein profiles of different commercially available fermented milk drinks that might have been influenced by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this study is to investigate the whey protein profiles of different commercially available fermented milk drinks that might have been influenced by the growth of probiotics bacteria that have been added according to the claims made by the manufacturer.

Design/methodology/approach

The growth and the subsequent effect of probiotics on whey proteins were investigated through the peptide profiles of the hydrolysed whey protein. The profiles of whey proteins in skimmed milk and the four other probiotic fermented milk drinks were obtained by using the FPLC technique. Changes in whey proteins profiles in fermented milks were evaluated by comparing them with those of unfermented skimmed milk (control). The four samples were those of Yakult, Actimel, Muller and Tesco probiotic cranberry drinks.

Findings

This work has shown that all samples demonstrated a degree of protein hydrolysis. The high level of hydrolysis in “Yakult” and “Actimel” drink samples might have been due to the nature of the process, the length of time of fermentation or the high level of proteolytic activities of the micro‐organisms used. When compared with casein, it seems that whey proteins are more resistant to hydrolysis. The results also indicated that only traces of α‐lactalbumin were left in the whey sample from “Yakult” drink. There were noticeable reductions in the other three samples. Orotic acid, on the other hand, showed a decrease in their concentration in all whey protein samples when compared with the skimmed milk sample, except for the “Actimel” sample, which showed a noticeable increase.

Originality/value

This work has shown that there were distinct differences between the control sample (skimmed milk) and the four commercially available probiotic milk‐based fermented health drinks when a direct comparison was carried out between these samples.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

For generations, Britain has had a household delivery of fresh milk; from the days before the Great War when it was delivered by a horse‐drawn milk float, with the…

Abstract

For generations, Britain has had a household delivery of fresh milk; from the days before the Great War when it was delivered by a horse‐drawn milk float, with the roundsman often bringing the housewife to the door with his cries of “Milk‐O!”. The float had a churn and milk was delivered in a small can, served out by a dipper. This was the start of the distributive trade, organised between the Wars, from which the present industry has emerged. The trade gave universal acceptance to the glass bottle, returnable for household delivery, only the method of sealing has changed. There have been many demands for its abandonment in favour of the carton, of which recent years has seen a rise in its use in the increasing sales of milk by supermarkets and stores. Despite the problems with returnable vessels, the glass bottle has a number of advantages. The milk, including the cream line, is clearly visible, and short measure is most unlikely, which is a growing problem with carton‐filled milk. The number of prosecutions for short measure with cartons must be causing concern to trading standards departments. There is nothing to indicate the offence until the carton is opened.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 86 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1900

The necessity of standards of purity for certain kinds of agricultural produce being now recognised by the new Adulteration Act—4, (1)—no apology is needed for attempting…

Abstract

The necessity of standards of purity for certain kinds of agricultural produce being now recognised by the new Adulteration Act—4, (1)—no apology is needed for attempting to bring the application of the principle into actual practice. Some few standards have already been generally adopted, and the legalization of limits relating to many of those substances with which the Adulteration Acts deal would undoubtedly be welcomed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Milena Casagranda, Priscila Berti Zanella, Alexandra Ferreira Vieira and Rodrigo Cauduro Oliveira Macedo

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the acute effect of milk proteins supplementation, compared to another nitrogen compound on muscle protein synthesis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the acute effect of milk proteins supplementation, compared to another nitrogen compound on muscle protein synthesis.

Design/methodology/approach

The search was conducted on MEDLINE® (via PUBMED®), Cochrane and Embase databases, using the terms “whey proteins,” “caseins,” “milk proteins,” “protein biosynthesis,” “human” and its related entry terms. The selected outcome was fractional synthetic rate (FSR) before (0) and 3 h after consumption of milk proteins, compared to supplementation with other protein sources or isolated amino acids.

Findings

The results were expressed as mean difference (MD) of absolute values between treatments with confidence interval (CI) of 95 per cent. Of the 1,913 identified studies, 4 were included, with a total of 74 participants. Milk proteins generated a greater FSR (MD 0.03 per cent/h, CI 95 per cent 0.02-0.04; p <0.00001), compared to control group. Acute consumption of milk proteins promotes higher increase in FSR than other protein sources or isolated amino acids.

Originality/value

This paper is a systematic review of the effects of milk proteins supplementation, which is considered an important subject because of its large consumption among athletes and physical exercise practitioners.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1969

Factors which influence consumer spending, among the most sought after in any field of market research, things people buy and why, is valuable data on which much…

Abstract

Factors which influence consumer spending, among the most sought after in any field of market research, things people buy and why, is valuable data on which much industrial planning, advertising techniques and marketing is based, but in no other field of trade is consumer preference so closely related to pure economics, i.e., value received in money terms, as in food. With most other commodities, from clothes to cars, hair‐do's to houses, factors affecting consumer choice have different results; appearance, aesthetic quality and neighbourly competition, all play a part, though appearance in a few foods is not entirely without significance, e.g., white bread. Present high levels of consumer spending are said by politicians to be a danger to the country's economy; a more prosaic thought would be that Government spending, or squandering, constituted the greater threat. In the main, factors which influence household food expenditure are essentially down to earth—palatability, digestibility, keeping quality and how far a food will go in the preparation of meals, its value in money terms. The king‐pin in all market research on food must be the woman of the house; it is her laying out of the household purse that determines the amount of food expenditure and the varieties purchased week by week. A housewife's choice, however, is a complex of her family's likes and dislikes, rarely her own, and also determined by the amount allocated from her purse for this part of the household budget and the number of mouths she has to feed. Any tendency to experiment, to extend the variety of food, is only possible with a well‐filled purse; with a large family, a common complaint is of monotony in the diet. A factor of immense importance nowadays is whether the housewife is employed or not, and whether whole‐time or part‐time, and which part of the day she can be in her own home. To this may be attributed, as much as anything, the rise in consumption of convenience foods. Fortunately for the purposes of reasonable accuracy in the results of enquiries, housewives form a class, reliable and steady, unlikely to be contaminated by the palsied opinions of the so‐called lunatic fringe in this unquiet age. Any differences in food choice are likely to be regional, and settled dietary habits, passed on from one generation to another. Statistics from the National Food Surveys show the extent of these, and also consumer preferences as far as food commodity groups are concerned. The Surveys have been running long enough to show something of consumer trends but, of course, they do not exhibit reasons—why consumers buy and use certain foods, their attitudes to food marketing practices, and, in particular, to advertising. Advertising claims, misleading undoubtedly but within the law, have long been a source of controversy between those who worship at the shrine of truth and others less particular. Elsewhere, we review a special study of consumer reactions to aspects of the grocery trade in the U.S.A., and note that 32 per cent do not accept advertisements as being true, but 85 per cent find them interesting and informative. Advertising practices are probably subject to less statutory control in the United States than here, and the descriptions and verbiage certainly reach greater heights of absurdity, but the British housewife is likely to be no more discerning, able “to read between the lines”, than her counterpart in that country. A major difference, however, is that in Britain, more houswives prepare and cook meals for their families than in the United States. The greatest importance of advertising is in the introductory phase of a commodity; new and more vigorous advertising is necessary later to delay the onset of the decline phase of the commodity's life cycle; to ensure that sales can be maintained to prevent rises in supply costs. Advertising helps considerably in the acceptance of a branded food, but housewives tend to ignore cut‐throat competition between rival brands, and what weans a consumer from a brand is not competition in advertising, nor even new and more attractive presentation, but reduction in real price. The main pre‐occupation of the woman of the house is food adequacy, and especially that her children will have what she considers conforms to a nutritious diet, without argument or rebellion on the part of her progeny and without distinction. She knows that bulk foods, carbohydrates, are not necessarily nutritious, although her ideas of which foods contain vitamins or minerals or other important nutrient factors tends to be hazy. She does not pretend to enjoy shopping for food and therefore tends to follow a routine; it saves time and worry. Especially is this so with young married women, who may have to take small children along. Each housewife has her own mental standard of assessing “value”, and would have difficulty in defining it. Nutritional value forms part of it, however, in most women, who connote their food provision with health. The greatest concern is not necessarily positive health, but prevention or reduction of obesity, which is seen among adult members of the family, especially growing girls, as an adverse effect on their appearance, and the types of clothes they can wear. A few of the more intelligent families have an indefinable fear of ischaemic heart disease and its relation to food. When they take positive steps to control the diet for these purposes, they are quite frequently in the wrong direction and rather confused even when this is done on medical advice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 71 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Derek Mozley

Three events of significance to this country took place in 1899 – the British Food Journal was launched, Australia retained the Ashes, and the Boer War hostilities…

Abstract

Three events of significance to this country took place in 1899 – the British Food Journal was launched, Australia retained the Ashes, and the Boer War hostilities commenced. If challenged on the order of their importance, cricketers and Empire‐builders may be excused their preference. However, looking at it purely from the standpoint of pro bono publico, the dispassionate observer must surely opt for the birth of a certain publication as being ultimately the most beneficial of the three.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

María Laura Mediza Romero, Mariana von Staszewski and María Julia Martínez

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of green tea polyphenols addition on physicochemical, microbiological and bioactive characteristics of yogurt.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of green tea polyphenols addition on physicochemical, microbiological and bioactive characteristics of yogurt.

Design/methodology/approach

Two incorporation methods of polyphenols were evaluated: direct addition or incorporated within protein particles of whey protein concentrate and gelatin. During yogurt’s shelf life, structure characteristics (water holding capacity, textural and rheological parameters), lactic acid bacteria (LAB) viability and polyphenols antioxidant activity were analyzed. Also, polyphenol bioaccesibility after in vitro digestion was evaluated.

Findings

Polyphenols addition (by the two methods used) did not affect the dynamics of the fermentation process, nor the LAB viability during storage. The color parameter a* for the yogurts with the highest polyphenol concentrations showed positive values (tending to red), but not visible to the naked eye. Because of the ability of polyphenols to interact with milk proteins, yogurts with polyphenols presented higher values in firmness and cohesiveness with respect to the control. Additionally, the incorporation of polyphenols in protein particles increased even more these parameters because of the higher protein content of these formulations. After simulated digestion, a high polyphenol bioaccesibility was observed, and the antioxidant activity was retained, which could be explained by the “protector” effect of the milk matrix.

Practical implications

Yogurt supplementation with green tea polyphenols is feasible for the development of functional food. However, the use of protein particles would not provide an extra benefit because milk proteins already act as protective molecules of polyphenols.

Originality/value

This study shows not only the physico-chemical implications of including polyphenols in yogurt but also their bioaccesibility after an in vitro digestion, revealing a suitable manner for delivery of antioxidants in a dairy product like yogurt.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Devendra Kumar, Akhilesh K. Verma, Manish Kumar Chatli, Raghvendar Singh, Pavan Kumar, Nitin Mehta and Om Prakash Malav

Camel as a livestock plays an important role in desert ecosystem and its milk has potential contribution in human nutrition in the hot and arid regions of the world. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Camel as a livestock plays an important role in desert ecosystem and its milk has potential contribution in human nutrition in the hot and arid regions of the world. This milk contains all the essential nutrients as found in other milk. Fresh and fermented camel milk has been used in different regions in the world including India, Russia and Sudan for human consumption as well as for treatment of a series of diseases such as dropsy, jaundice, tuberculosis, asthma and leishmaniasis or kala-azar. The present paper aims to explore the possibility of camel milk as an alternative milk for human consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Recently, camel milk and its components were also reported to have other potential therapeutic properties, such as anti-carcinogenic, anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive and renoprotective potential; and for autism, and has been recommended to be consumed by children who are allergic to bovine milk.

Findings

It has also been reported to alleviate oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in rats. Camel milk differs from bovine milk in composition. It contains low total solids and fat; however, proteins and lactose are in equal amount but of higher quality than cow milk. Because of the high percentage of β-casein, low percentage of α-casein, deficiency of β-lactoglobulin and similarity of the immunoglobulins, it become safer for persons who are allergic to bovine milk. It contains protective proteins in higher amount which contributes to its functionality. The fermentation and enzymatic hydrolysis of camel protein produce different types of bioactive peptides which exerts different activity in in vitro and in vivo conditions.

Originality/value

Because of its unique quality and functionality, this milk has potential application in management of different diseases and application in food industries.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1975

At the passing of the Fair Trading Act, 1973, and the setting up of a Consumer Protection Service with an Office of Fair Trading under a Director‐General, few could have…

Abstract

At the passing of the Fair Trading Act, 1973, and the setting up of a Consumer Protection Service with an Office of Fair Trading under a Director‐General, few could have visualized this comprehensive machinery devised to protect the mainly economic interests of consumers could be used to further the efforts of local enforcement officers and authorities in the field of purity and quality control of food and of food hygiene in particular. This, however, is precisely the effect of a recent initiative under Sect. 34 of the Act, reported elsewhere in the BFJ, taken by the Director‐General in securing from a company operating a large group of restaurants a written undertaking, as prescribed by the Section, that it would improve its standards of hygiene; the company had ten convictions for hygiene contraventions over a period of six years.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 77 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Paul Ainsworth

Investigates the factors determining the quality of milk and heat‐treated milk products. Discusses the composition and structure of milk with particular reference to…

Abstract

Investigates the factors determining the quality of milk and heat‐treated milk products. Discusses the composition and structure of milk with particular reference to proteins, fat and lactose with emphasis on emulsion stability, fat globules and the casein micelles. Describes the preservation of milk by heat treatment to produce pasteurized, sterilized, ultra heat‐treated milks, and the chemical and physical changes taking place during this processing.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000