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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Van Thac Dang, Jianming Wang, Hoang Viet Nguyen, Quang Huy Nguyen and Ninh Nguyen

Previous research has yielded mixed results on the relationship between consumer perception and purchase intention towards organic food products. Although the prior…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has yielded mixed results on the relationship between consumer perception and purchase intention towards organic food products. Although the prior literature has widely applied planned behaviour theory, using a single theoretical approach often provides limited understanding of organic food consumption. This study builds upon consumer perception and social cognitive theories to examine the effects of perceived food healthiness and environmental consciousness on the purchase intention of organic drinking products. The current research also assesses the mediating role of consumer extrinsic motivation and moderating role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) beliefs in these effects.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was applied to collect data from 606 consumers from different food retailers in Vietnam. Data were analysed using multivariate analysis techniques, such as structural equation modelling and bootstrap analysis.

Findings

Results of hypothesis testing support the predictive ability of perception and social cognitive theories in explaining consumers' perceptions, motivation and behavioural intention towards organic drinking products. Furthermore, results provide evidence for the moderating effect of CSR beliefs on the relationship between consumer extrinsic motivation and purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study may be amongst the first that explains consumption of organic drinking products from the perspectives of consumer perception and social cognitive theories. It provides a unique research model that explains the influence of perceived food healthiness and environmental consciousness on purchase intention of organic drinking products with the mediating role of consumer extrinsic motivation and moderating role of CSR beliefs. The current research provides fresh insights into the consumption of organic drinking products in an emerging market based on a mediated moderation mechanism, which has been limited in the prior literature.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Chin‐Tsai Lin and Pi‐Fang Hsu

This study applied the GM(1,1) model of Grey theory to forecast sales of eight sub‐category non‐alcoholic beverages in Taiwan between 2001 and 2003. According to our…

Abstract

This study applied the GM(1,1) model of Grey theory to forecast sales of eight sub‐category non‐alcoholic beverages in Taiwan between 2001 and 2003. According to our measured results, the accuracy of the new forecasting model exceeds 95 per cent. The validity of predictions using the new model is clearly high. The model estimates that the total beverages market will grow, but growth rates will vary for individual sub‐categories. In relation to current growth, from 2001 to 2003, tea drinks, carbonated drinks, functional drinks and sports drinks will experience decreased market growth, while bottled water and fruit and vegetable juices will be a high growth market and coffee drinks and other drinks will enjoy improved sales. These results provide a valuable reference for the Taiwanese beverage industry developing marketing plans.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Paul Davie

The development of marketing thinking has been stimulated by the pressures of competition. If growing competition for more mature and discriminating markets is a major…

Abstract

The development of marketing thinking has been stimulated by the pressures of competition. If growing competition for more mature and discriminating markets is a major trend for the next decade, the pursuit of improved product quality and of excellence will be an essential management response. New product development is a vital part of marketing policy for all companies and organisations, as it represents one of the key means by which corporate renewal is achieved and a future secured. This article analyses new product development in the light of the new alcohol soft drink products, which presents a myriad of challenges and opportunities for beverage manufactures and the UK drinks market These drinks have been latched onto by brewers who were desperate to win over young people who had snubbed beer and cider; but their drive has backfired, with drinks such as Hoopers Hooch being condemned for their appeal towards the teenager. In view of this, the article will conclude by identifying the controversial implications these drinks will have for the future stability of the alcoholic soft drink market

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2015

Richard Mills and Lorna Wing

Excessive drinking of fluids occurs across the autism spectrum but despite the detrimental and potentially hazardous consequences very few studies of this phenomenon have…

Abstract

Purpose

Excessive drinking of fluids occurs across the autism spectrum but despite the detrimental and potentially hazardous consequences very few studies of this phenomenon have been published. Literature on the topic is sparse. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues via a large on-line survey and a clinic sample. It is hoped this study will encourage further interest in and investigation including exploration of the links with the neurology underlying autistic conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Results were obtained via a large on-line survey of autistic individuals and parents and carers (n=637) and data from referrals to a single diagnostic assessment and diagnostic clinic.

Findings

Of 634 respondents of the on-line survey 474 reported excessive drinking of fluids in severe form. Almost two-thirds stated that this started before the age of five years. Of the children and adults seen at the clinic approximately one-third had dunk fluids excessively in the past. The effects of gender, type of autism condition, intellectual disability, reported stress and associated conditions were examined as were the type of fluids drunk and rate of drinking. The response to having to wait for a drink and the occurrence of vomiting and diarrhoea were also examined.

Research limitations/implications

This is a preliminary study but with a large sample size. Limitations lie in the sparse amount of literature on this topic as it affects autism and reliance on parental and self-reports from an on-line survey, the majority of whom responded to an appeal for participants for whom excessive drinking of fluids was an established problem. The clinic sample comprised children and adults who had not been referred for reasons connected to excessive drinking of fluids but for whom this was still a significant problem. A further limitation concerns the absence of data on sensory profiles. This would be worth including in any follow up.

Practical implications

It is important to be aware of the implications of excessive drinking of fluids on the health and well-being of children and adults on the autism spectrum. As there are potentially lethal consequences associated with such behaviours it is essential that they are recognised, understood and responded to.

Social implications

Excessive drinking of fluids has implications for the development of the child and far reaching consequences for physical and social well-being.

Originality/value

This is an original paper that draws on the limited literature available but is primarily based on the results of a unique on-line survey and evaluation of a clinic sample.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Paul Hewlett and Emma Wadsworth

The aim of this paper is to determine lifestyle factors associated with different drink choices as past research has suggested some differences.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine lifestyle factors associated with different drink choices as past research has suggested some differences.

Design/methodology/approach

Caffeinated tea and coffee consuming habits in a South Wales sample were investigated by postal questionnaire. Multiple regression was used to determine odds ratios for demographic, health and lifestyle factors associated with drink patterns. There were 7,979 questionnaire respondents, 58 per cent of whom were female. Their mean age was 45.61 years (SD =18.00, range =16‐97).

Findings

Caffeinated tea/coffee consumption was associated with both alcohol and smoking behaviours. The results also suggested that non‐consumers of caffeinated tea or coffee were not a homogeneous group, as different demographic and lifestyle profiles were identified for: those that did not drink tea or coffee at all; and those that drank only decaffeinated tea or coffee.

Research limitations/implications

Future caffeine research may need to consider whether a broad distinction based on caffeine consumption or non‐consumption alone is always appropriate.

Originality/value

The findings suggest some differences within the caffeinated drink consuming population, including demographic profiles relating to whether consumers drank tea or coffee. They add to the data already available in comparing not only caffeine versus no caffeine, but also characteristics associated with different caffeinated drinks.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Marie Reid and Richard Hammersley

It has been suggested that habitual consumers of sugar experience “cravings” when deprived. Subjects (n = 27) who habitually consumed sugar‐sweetened drinks were placed on…

Abstract

It has been suggested that habitual consumers of sugar experience “cravings” when deprived. Subjects (n = 27) who habitually consumed sugar‐sweetened drinks were placed on a seven‐day regime receiving either sugar‐sweetened drinks, or aspartame‐sweetened alternatives. A between‐subjects design was used to prevent subjects comparing the drinks, which were given blind with the cover story that the study was testing a new drink. In fact commercial carbonated beverages were given. At the end, subjects were unable to guess which they had received. Subjects completed a prospective food diary and rated mood daily using the Profile of Mood States, as well as before and after each test drink, using simple visual analogue scales. Compared to subsequent days, on the first day of the study subjects receiving aspartame‐sweetened drinks ate fewer grams of carbohydrate and had fewer sugar episodes (where sugars, or sugar‐fat, or sugar‐alcohol mixtures were consumed). Overall energy intake for the day was unaffected. By day two, there were no differences between the groups in diet or mood. Body weight at seven days was unaltered from baseline. Blind substitution of aspartame‐sweetened for sugar‐sweetened soft drinks did not increase other sugar consumption and did not adversely affect mood. Any effects of this dietary change appear transient.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Mary Ellen Huls and David A. Tyckoson

The consumption of alcoholic beverages has been a social custom throughout the world since the beginning of recorded history. Various wines, beers, and liquors have been a…

Abstract

The consumption of alcoholic beverages has been a social custom throughout the world since the beginning of recorded history. Various wines, beers, and liquors have been a part of almost every culture since ancient times. The modern cocktail originated in Elizabethan England and quickly spread throughout the world. And just as new experiments continually add to the variety of known alcoholic beverages, new books appear describing these drinks and the recipes required to mix them. From yesterday's mulled wine and cider to today's Mai Tai, Margarita, and Tequila Sunrise, bartenders and home party planners refer to these sources when making both traditional and exotic drink recipes. This review is a comparison of thirteen currently available commercial bar guides. While libraries have not traditionally collected in the bar guide genre, every library should have at least one in its collection for use as a reference source or for patrons to use in their homes.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Robyn Ramsden, Delwyn Hewitt, Joanne Williams, Lee Emberton and Catherine Bennett

This paper explores the impact of a suite of alcohol culture change interventions implemented by Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. The interventions were designed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the impact of a suite of alcohol culture change interventions implemented by Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. The interventions were designed to change the alcohol culture at a bi-annual nation-wide university multi-sport competition known as Uni Nationals. This study aims to understand the critical success factors of the alcohol culture change initiatives that were developed by the university and implemented as part of a broader set of institutional practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research design utilised in-depth, semi-structured interviews with nine Uni Nationals student team leaders. In total, two group interviews and four individual interviews were conducted with student team leaders who participated in the Uni Nationals. The interview transcripts were coded and themed. The themes were further refined and interpreted into a narrative. A total of two transcripts were independently coded by the first two authors. Discordant coding was flagged and discussed until a consensus was achieved. The remaining interviews were coded by the first author and discussed with the second author to ensure consistency. A socio-ecological framework was used to understand perceived changes to alcohol culture.

Findings

Student leaders were aware of and felt supported by the university-wide approach to changing the culture of Uni Nationals. Overall, the qualitative study indicated that students were positive about the alcohol culture change interventions. The leadership training that engaged team leaders in interactive activities had the greatest impact. Student leaders found the targeted messages, mocktail events and Chef de Mission (CdM) less effective cultural change strategies. However, they helped to establish expectations of students in this setting where a heightened focus on sport was associated with higher alcohol consumption.

Originality/value

While there has been growing academic interest in exploring “drinking cultures”, there has been relatively little focus on alcohol culture of university students at sporting events. The paper contributes to addressing this gap by shedding light on the impact of a group of interventions on the drinking culture of the Uni Nationals subculture.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Kate Sylvester and Brent McDonald

Purpose – This chapter illustrates how female university kendo club members participate in kendo-related hegemonic drinking in formal (heterosocial) and informal…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter illustrates how female university kendo club members participate in kendo-related hegemonic drinking in formal (heterosocial) and informal (homosocial) club settings. An alternative perspective on gender relations and identity politics in Japan is outlined in this chapter by describing the significance of hegemonic drinking for female kendo club members within homosocial spaces.

Methodology – As a participant-observer, an ethnographic method was applied for an 18-month period as a quasi-member of a Japanese Sports University Kendo Club. Key to accessing the female members' lived experience was the primary author's participation in daily training and the consumption of alcohol in various kendo spaces. The data discussed in this chapter were collected via semi-structured interviews, daily self-reflexive descriptive field notes and ethnographic interviews.

Findings – Hegemonic drinking practices in heterosocial university kendo club spaces encompass networking opportunity, transference of knowledge, and fortitude building, all of which are systemized to support the advancement of male members. Although female members are relatively obscured in heterosocial spaces, women mimic and engage in hegemonic drinking practices in homosocial settings to substantiate meaning to their membership.

Research limitations/implication – Research that engages with the intersection of sport and gender needs to consider aspects of social interaction not only of the physical component of the sport but also the other day-to-day activities related to it. The examination of women and kendo-related hegemonic drinking in this chapter provides an insightful perspective and highlights the value of the ethnographic method in unexplored places of enquiry integral to researching physical cultures and body politics in Japan.

Details

Sport, Alcohol and Social Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-842-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Ho Kwong Kwan, Xiaofeng Xu, Haixiao Chen and Miaomiao Li

Drawing on the social cognitive theory, this study investigated the effect of mentors' drinking norms on their protégés' alcohol misuse by focusing on the mediating role…

Abstract

Drawing on the social cognitive theory, this study investigated the effect of mentors' drinking norms on their protégés' alcohol misuse by focusing on the mediating role of conformity drinking motives and the moderating role of moral disengagement. We conducted a three-wave survey of 148 mentor–protégé dyads and found that mentors' drinking norms were positively related to their protégés' alcohol misuse and that this relationship was fully mediated by conformity drinking motives. Moreover, the moderated mediation model revealed that moral engagement strengthens the main effects of mentors' drinking norms on conformity drinking motives and the indirect effects of mentors' drinking norms on protégés' alcohol misuse via enhanced conformity drinking motives. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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