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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Sherazede Bouderbala and Malika Bouchenak

– The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of olive or salmon oil on the hepatic storage and transport of fatty acids by very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of olive or salmon oil on the hepatic storage and transport of fatty acids by very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL).

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 24 male Wistar rats (80 ± 5 g) were fed a 0.5 per cent cholesterol-enriched diet with either 20 per cent casein (C) or chickpea (CP) proteins with 10 per cent olive (O) or salmon (S) oil for 28 days.

Findings

In VLDL-triacyglycerols fatty acids, oleic acid content was higher in CPS as compared to that in CS or CPO and lower in CS and CPO than that in CO; linoleic acid content was higher in all groups; arachidonic acid content was higher in CS and CPO as compared to that in CO. In the liver, TG fatty acids content was lower in CPO or CPS as compared to that in CO or CS; oleic and arachidonic acid contents were lower in CPS than that in CPO; linoleic acid content was lower in CS, CPS and CPO than that in CO, CPO and CO. In liver, phospholipid fatty acid, oleic and arachidonic acid contents were lower in CPS than that in CS; oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acid contents were lower in CPO compared to that in CO. In liver, cholesteryl esters fatty acids, oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acids contents were higher in CPS as compared to that in CS; oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acid contents were lower in CS as compared to that in CO; linoleic and arachidonic acid contents were lower in CPS than that in CPO.

Originality/value

A cholesterol-enriched diet containing casein or chickpea proteins combined with olive or salmon oil affects the hepatic storage and transport of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids by VLDL.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Magnar Forbord

In every industry there are resources. Some are moving, others more fixed; some are technical, others social. People working with the resources, for example, as buyers or…

Abstract

In every industry there are resources. Some are moving, others more fixed; some are technical, others social. People working with the resources, for example, as buyers or sellers, or users or producers, may not make much notice of them. A product sells. A facility functions. The business relationship in which we make our money has “always” been there. However, some times this picture of order is disturbed. A user having purchased a product for decades may “suddenly” say to the producer that s/he does not appreciate the product. And a producer having received an order of a product that s/he thought was well known, may find it impossible to sell it. Such disturbances may be ignored. Or they can be used as a platform for development. In this study we investigate the latter option, theoretically and through real world data. Concerning theory we draw on the industrial network approach. We see industrial actors as part of (industrial) networks. In their activities actors use and produce resources. Moreover, the actors interact − bilaterally and multilaterally. This leads to development of resources and networks. Through “thick” descriptions of two cases we illustrate and try to understand the interactive character of resource development and how actors do business on features of resources. The cases are about a certain type of resource, a product − goat milk. The main message to industrial actors is that they should pay attention to that products can be co-created. Successful co-creation of products, moreover, may require development also of business relationships and their connections (“networking”).

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Bouderbala Shérazède, Lamri‐Senhadji Myriem, Boualga Ahmed, Belleville Jacques, Prost Josiane and Bouchenak Malika

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of different dietary protein and lipid origins on serum HDL2 and HDL3 compositions and lecithin: cholesterol…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of different dietary protein and lipid origins on serum HDL2 and HDL3 compositions and lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity in growing rats fed a 0.5 per cent cholesterol‐enriched diet with either 20 per cent casein (C), chick pea (CP) or lentil (L) proteins combined to 10 per cent olive (O) or salmon (S) oil for 28 days.

Design/methodology/approach

HDL2 and HDL3 separation according to Sjöblom and Eklund and LCAT activity according to Glomset and Wright.

Findings

Serum total cholesterol was 1.3‐fold lower in CPS than in CPO group. HDL3 amounts were 2‐ and 1.5‐fold higher in CPO and LO groups, respectively, compared to CO group. HDL3‐unesterified cholesterol values were, respectively, 2‐ and 5‐fold lower in CPO and LO groups than in CO group, and were threefold decreased in CPS and LS groups vs CS group. HDL3‐phospholipids in LO group represented 12 and 51 per cent of the CO and CPO group values, respectively. HDL2‐triacylglycerol amounts were decreased in LO group vs CO group (−67 per cent) and in CPS and LS groups (−62 per cent) compared to CS group. HDL3‐apolipoprotein A‐I values were lower in LO group vs CO and CPO groups, and in CPS group vs CS group. However, LCAT activity was similar in all the studied groups.

Originality/value

The paper shows that when diets containing casein, chick pea or lentil proteins combined with olive or salmon oil are supplemented with cholesterol, HDL2 and HDL3 compositions are impaired despite unchanged LCAT activity. Moreover, if oils modify HDL compositions, dietary proteins play a critical role in these modifications.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Devendra Kumar, Akhilesh K. Verma, Manish Kumar Chatli, Raghvendar Singh, Pavan Kumar, Nitin Mehta and Om Prakash Malav

Camel as a livestock plays an important role in desert ecosystem and its milk has potential contribution in human nutrition in the hot and arid regions of the world. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Camel as a livestock plays an important role in desert ecosystem and its milk has potential contribution in human nutrition in the hot and arid regions of the world. This milk contains all the essential nutrients as found in other milk. Fresh and fermented camel milk has been used in different regions in the world including India, Russia and Sudan for human consumption as well as for treatment of a series of diseases such as dropsy, jaundice, tuberculosis, asthma and leishmaniasis or kala-azar. The present paper aims to explore the possibility of camel milk as an alternative milk for human consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Recently, camel milk and its components were also reported to have other potential therapeutic properties, such as anti-carcinogenic, anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive and renoprotective potential; and for autism, and has been recommended to be consumed by children who are allergic to bovine milk.

Findings

It has also been reported to alleviate oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in rats. Camel milk differs from bovine milk in composition. It contains low total solids and fat; however, proteins and lactose are in equal amount but of higher quality than cow milk. Because of the high percentage of β-casein, low percentage of α-casein, deficiency of β-lactoglobulin and similarity of the immunoglobulins, it become safer for persons who are allergic to bovine milk. It contains protective proteins in higher amount which contributes to its functionality. The fermentation and enzymatic hydrolysis of camel protein produce different types of bioactive peptides which exerts different activity in in vitro and in vivo conditions.

Originality/value

Because of its unique quality and functionality, this milk has potential application in management of different diseases and application in food industries.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Hayriye Sekban and Zekai Tarakci

The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical, textural and sensory properties of some starter cultures fruit-added Golot cheese.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical, textural and sensory properties of some starter cultures fruit-added Golot cheese.

Design/methodology/approach

Six types of Golot cheeses were produced in this study. While the control sample contained no starter cultures, five different starter culture combinations (GS1: Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, L. lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus bulgaricus; GS2: S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus; GS3: S. thermophilus; GS4: S. thermophilus and Lactobacillus helveticus; and GS5: S. thermophilus, L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis) were applied to the other cheese samples using an immersion technique. Then, all cheeses were vacuum-packed and ripened at 4 ± 1°C for three months and their chemical, biochemical, sensory and textural analyses were performed on the 2nd, 15th, 30th, 60th and 90th days of ripening.

Findings

Results indicated that generally starter cultures have positive effects on the chemical, biochemical and sensory properties of Golot cheese. Considering the final values, the addition of starter cultures enhanced the ripening index of Golot cheeses (8.4%–9.2%), except the GS3 (7.4%), compared to the control (8.1%). At the end of the ripening period, meltability values of GS4 (16.5 mm) cultured cheeses were higher than those of other cultured cheeses (13.0–15.5 mm) and control cheese (14.5 mm). While lipolysis values were low in fresh cheese, it increased during ripening. Overall, GS3 (2.46 acid degree value [ADV]) and GS4 (2.40 ADV) had the highest lipolysis rate, while GS1 (2.14 ADV) had the lowest (p = 0.07). Electrophoretograms indicated that the highest fragmentation of α- and ß-casein occurred in GS5 (48.43%) and GS1 (44.24%), respectively. Also, GS5 was the most appreciated and preferred cheese in terms of sensory. Regarding texture, hardness, cohesiveness, adhesiveness, springiness and gumminess values were determined to be statistically important in terms of ripening time and cheese variety (p < 0.01).

Originality/value

Consequently, all starters had a positive impact on Golot cheese samples and among all S. thermophilus and L. helveticus starter were determined to be the most applicable one considering ripening, texture, sensory and melting properties.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Milena Casagranda, Priscila Berti Zanella, Alexandra Ferreira Vieira and Rodrigo Cauduro Oliveira Macedo

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the acute effect of milk proteins supplementation, compared to another nitrogen compound on muscle protein synthesis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the acute effect of milk proteins supplementation, compared to another nitrogen compound on muscle protein synthesis.

Design/methodology/approach

The search was conducted on MEDLINE® (via PUBMED®), Cochrane and Embase databases, using the terms “whey proteins,” “caseins,” “milk proteins,” “protein biosynthesis,” “human” and its related entry terms. The selected outcome was fractional synthetic rate (FSR) before (0) and 3 h after consumption of milk proteins, compared to supplementation with other protein sources or isolated amino acids.

Findings

The results were expressed as mean difference (MD) of absolute values between treatments with confidence interval (CI) of 95 per cent. Of the 1,913 identified studies, 4 were included, with a total of 74 participants. Milk proteins generated a greater FSR (MD 0.03 per cent/h, CI 95 per cent 0.02-0.04; p <0.00001), compared to control group. Acute consumption of milk proteins promotes higher increase in FSR than other protein sources or isolated amino acids.

Originality/value

This paper is a systematic review of the effects of milk proteins supplementation, which is considered an important subject because of its large consumption among athletes and physical exercise practitioners.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Paul Ainsworth

Uses the basic chemical and physical information discussed in “Milk and milk products I” and applies this information to a range of other milk products. Describes the…

Abstract

Uses the basic chemical and physical information discussed in “Milk and milk products I” and applies this information to a range of other milk products. Describes the methods of preparation of concentrated and dried milks, cream and butter, and fermented milk products, particularly yogurt and cheese. Discusses the chemical and physical changes taking place during the preparation of these products and how these changes determine the quality characteristics.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1947

G. Fitzgerald‐Lee

IN 1865, Alexander Parkes, of Birmingham, found that the potential explosive nitrocellulose could be plasticized by being mixed with camphor and alcohol, and thus was…

Abstract

IN 1865, Alexander Parkes, of Birmingham, found that the potential explosive nitrocellulose could be plasticized by being mixed with camphor and alcohol, and thus was discovered the ‘celluloid’ named, after its originator, ‘Parkesite’, the forefrunner of ‘Xylonite’. This discovery was the beginning of the plastics industry which has, in only eighty years or so, grown to be one of the major industries; so much so, in fact, that the Twentieth Century has been referred to, by some enthusiasts, as the ‘Plastics Age’.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Daniella Cristine Fialho Lopes, Fernanda Meneghello Delvivo and Marialice Pinto Coelho Silvestre

This paper aims at testing several conditions using activated carbon for removing phenylalanine (Phe) from protein hydrolysates, in order to prepare dietary supplements…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at testing several conditions using activated carbon for removing phenylalanine (Phe) from protein hydrolysates, in order to prepare dietary supplements for phenylketonurics, based on skim milk.

Design/methodology/approach

Six hydrolysates from skim milk were prepared, using a protease from Aspergillus oryzae (AO), isolated or in association with papain (PA). Some parameters were tested for removing Phe, such as amount of activated carbon, temperature and stirring time. The second derivative spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the efficiency of Phe removal.

Findings

The best condition for removing Phe was achieved using an activated carbon: casein ratio of 118 (in g), a stirring time of 30 min, at a temperature of 25°C, which produced 96 to 99 per cent of Phe removal. Among the hydrolytic conditions employed, the association of AO and PA (1 hour, 1 per cent and 4 hours, 2 per cent, respectively) led to the lowest absolute value for the final Phe concentration (0.060 × 10−4 mg/100 mg of protein).

Original/value

Since we know, there is no formula for PKU on the market based on skim milk hydrolysed proteins. Isolated casein, the main milk protein, is the choice in most cases. This is a factor that may be taken in consideration especially in developing countries, where milk proteins are imported and, consequently, are much more expensive than skim milk.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1972

J. Bax and B.J. Sauntson

Synthetic polymers were first introduced to the wallpaper trade about twenty‐five years ago. Until that time natural polymers, such as casein and starch, were the only…

Abstract

Synthetic polymers were first introduced to the wallpaper trade about twenty‐five years ago. Until that time natural polymers, such as casein and starch, were the only suitable binders available, and it was necessary to insolubilise them with alum or glyoxal in order to afford some degree of water resistance to the prints. The only smear‐proof washable papers were those supercoated with a film of varnish. This varnish supercoat was the first to be replaced by a synthetic polymer emulsion.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 1 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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