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Investigation on whey proteins profile of commercially available milk‐based probiotics health drinks using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)

Omar A. Alhaj (Cardiff School of Health Sciences, Food Research and Consultancy Unit, University of Wales Institute Cardiff, Cardiff, UK)
Ara D. Kanekanian (Cardiff School of Health Sciences, Food Research and Consultancy Unit, University of Wales Institute Cardiff, Cardiff, UK)
Adrian C. Peters (Cardiff School of Health Sciences, Food Research and Consultancy Unit, University of Wales Institute Cardiff, Cardiff, UK)

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Article publication date: 19 June 2007

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this study is to investigate the whey protein profiles of different commercially available fermented milk drinks that might have been influenced by the growth of probiotics bacteria that have been added according to the claims made by the manufacturer.

Design/methodology/approach

The growth and the subsequent effect of probiotics on whey proteins were investigated through the peptide profiles of the hydrolysed whey protein. The profiles of whey proteins in skimmed milk and the four other probiotic fermented milk drinks were obtained by using the FPLC technique. Changes in whey proteins profiles in fermented milks were evaluated by comparing them with those of unfermented skimmed milk (control). The four samples were those of Yakult, Actimel, Muller and Tesco probiotic cranberry drinks.

Findings

This work has shown that all samples demonstrated a degree of protein hydrolysis. The high level of hydrolysis in “Yakult” and “Actimel” drink samples might have been due to the nature of the process, the length of time of fermentation or the high level of proteolytic activities of the micro‐organisms used. When compared with casein, it seems that whey proteins are more resistant to hydrolysis. The results also indicated that only traces of α‐lactalbumin were left in the whey sample from “Yakult” drink. There were noticeable reductions in the other three samples. Orotic acid, on the other hand, showed a decrease in their concentration in all whey protein samples when compared with the skimmed milk sample, except for the “Actimel” sample, which showed a noticeable increase.

Originality/value

This work has shown that there were distinct differences between the control sample (skimmed milk) and the four commercially available probiotic milk‐based fermented health drinks when a direct comparison was carried out between these samples.

Keywords

Citation

Alhaj, O.A., Kanekanian, A.D. and Peters, A.C. (2007), "Investigation on whey proteins profile of commercially available milk‐based probiotics health drinks using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)", British Food Journal, Vol. 109 No. 6, pp. 469-480. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070700710753526

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2007, Emerald Group Publishing Limited