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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

R. Waite

From time to time items in newspapers predict that the dairy cow will soon become obsolete and that a bright new idea is to make milk without her help. They usually claim…

Abstract

From time to time items in newspapers predict that the dairy cow will soon become obsolete and that a bright new idea is to make milk without her help. They usually claim that the artificial milk has a higher nutritive value and more health promoting properties. Most of these write‐ups are nonsense and die a natural death but there is, in fact, an industry devoted to producing what may be loosely termed ‘manufactured milk’. But these factories still rely largely on our old friend the cow for much of their raw material.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1979

Hendrik A. Baert

States that the continuing structural disequilibrium in the marketing of milk and milk products is of concern in the EEC. Analyses the complex intervention mechanism…

Abstract

States that the continuing structural disequilibrium in the marketing of milk and milk products is of concern in the EEC. Analyses the complex intervention mechanism established by the commission for this market.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

Christophoros P. Pappas

Differences in the laws and regulations with respect to basic materials, optional ingredients and food additives authorised in ice‐cream manufacture in the EC members…

Abstract

Differences in the laws and regulations with respect to basic materials, optional ingredients and food additives authorised in ice‐cream manufacture in the EC members states were studied. No substantial differences exist regarding most of the basic materials. However, there are differences in certain of these materials, e.g. non‐milk fats, skimmed milk powder or sweetners other than sucrose. More differences exist among the optional ingredients and food additives. Most of the food additives authorised by each state ae in the list of additives approved by the EC Council. Compositional requirements for different ice‐cream types were also studied.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Joan P. Alcock

The Milk Marketing Boards were established in 1933 in order to ensure aregular collection of milk from farmers and a reliable delivery of milkto customers. They perfected…

666

Abstract

The Milk Marketing Boards were established in 1933 in order to ensure a regular collection of milk from farmers and a reliable delivery of milk to customers. They perfected a distribution system which proved its worth in the Second World War by ensuring an essential supply of milk under difficult circumstances. In 1993, the Government proposed that the English Milk Marketing Board should become a voluntary co‐operative with the title Milk Marque. This would make its own arrangements for the collection of milk from farmers and would compete with dairy companies such as Nestle and Northern Foods as farmers would be able to make their own arrangements over milk collection and milk products. The new system was to be in place by 1 April. Because of objections, any decisions have been postponed until 1 October or beyond.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Aicha Benyahia‐Mostefaoui, Sabrine Louala and Myriem Lamri‐Senhadji

The present investigation was undertaken to study the potential effects of milk lipids compared to sardine oil on inflammation biomarkers and lipid peroxidation in…

184

Abstract

Purpose

The present investigation was undertaken to study the potential effects of milk lipids compared to sardine oil on inflammation biomarkers and lipid peroxidation in hypercholesterolemic rats. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Male Wistar rats were fed 20 percent casein combined with 5 percent milk lipids or 5 percent sardine oil and 1 percent cholesterol for 28 days. A control group was fed a standard diet.

Findings

No significant difference in serum triacylglycerol (TG) was found in the milk lipids versus sardine oil and control. However, serum TG was reduced (1.7‐fold) with sardine oil compared with the control. Serum total cholesterol (TC) was, respectively, 3.6‐ and 2.5‐fold higher in milk lipids and sardine oil, respectively, compared with control. Compared to sardine oil, TC value was 1.4‐fold higher in the milk lipid. Serum C‐reactive protein (CRP) was elevated (eight‐ and 33‐fold) in the milk lipid and sardine oil compared to control, respectively. However, CRP value was four‐fold lower in milk lipids than those in sardine oil. Compared to sardine oil, iron value was two‐fold higher in milk lipids versus sardine oil. Malondialdehyde content of red blood cell, heart and brain were decreased in milk lipids versus sardine oil (p<0.05). Hydroperoxydes contents in milk lipids were also lower in heart and aorta compared to sardine oil and control (p<0.05).

Originality/value

Milk lipids compared to sardine oil does not modulate the hypercholesterolemia but decreases inflammation biomarkers and seems to protect efficiency of some tissues against the cytotoxic action and oxidative stress of cholesterol enriched diet.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

S.A.E. Bates and Naomi Pattisson

Examines UK milk pricing since market deregulation in November 1994. Finds a wide range of milk price contracts on offer, with many processing companies paying prices…

1309

Abstract

Examines UK milk pricing since market deregulation in November 1994. Finds a wide range of milk price contracts on offer, with many processing companies paying prices above those paid by the voluntary farmer co‐operatives. Looks at the factors influencing dairy farmers’ initial choice of milk supply contract in the months preceding deregulation of the UK dairy sector in November 1994. Finds around 70 per cent of farmers surveyed, slightly above the percentage for all milk producers, signed to supply the voluntary farmers co‐operative, Milk Marque. Then surveys farmers to identify those who have switched supply contract during the year, finding little evidence of movement. Attempts to understand the apparent differences between farmers’ expectations in their initial contract choice and the market realities they have experienced over that period.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

S. Sarkar

Breast milk is considered superior over other modified infant formulae owing to its numerous intrinsic characteristics and pre‐eminence. However, breast milk is…

1000

Abstract

Breast milk is considered superior over other modified infant formulae owing to its numerous intrinsic characteristics and pre‐eminence. However, breast milk is nutritionally inadequate for low‐birth weight infants and infants fed exclusively on breast milk are at the risk of getting infected with HIV‐1 and transmitted drugs in breast milk due to sterility of mothers at the time of pregnancy. In absence or insufficient secretion, breast milk stored at human milk banks or various developed infant formulae may be a practical substitute. Microbiological safety of breast milk from human milk banks is governed by the conditions of its collection and storage, whereas method of reconstitution and sterilization of equipments influences the quality of infant formulae. Under this circumstances various specially developed cultured milk products can be recommended for feeding both normal and sick infants. This paper enlightens the recent research innovations in the field of cultured milk products for feeding infants in absence of breast milk.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Christophoros P. Pappas

In recent years the consumption of ultra‐high temperature (UHT)milk has increased steadily throughout the countries of the EuropeanCommunity (EC). The legislation…

Abstract

In recent years the consumption of ultra‐high temperature (UHT) milk has increased steadily throughout the countries of the European Community (EC). The legislation concerning the composition and manufacture of UHT milk in each EC member state (except Spain and Portugal) is studied.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

B. Pajin, I. Radujko, Z. Šereš, D. Šoronja Simović, J. Gyura and M. Sakač

Investigated milk fat fraction differs in physical attributes, first of all in melting point and solid fat content and its influence on crystallization process of cocoa…

Abstract

Purpose

Investigated milk fat fraction differs in physical attributes, first of all in melting point and solid fat content and its influence on crystallization process of cocoa butter i.e. chocolate mass. It means that this fraction slows down crystallization rate, decreases melting point of mixture with cocoa butter and causes chocolate softness. It is very important for quality of chocolate especially chocolate with nuts or sunflower kernel. The aim of this paper was to investigate the influence of low‐melting (26°C) milk fat fraction on crystallization processes in chocolate mass and define the optimal concentration of this fraction with suitable precrystallization temperature time regime. Solid fat content of chocolate which designates the influence of precrystallization changes in chocolate mass with addition of milk fat fractions was investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The precrystallization was performed in a laboratory crystallizer that is in a modified Brabender pharinograph, which measures the rheological characteristics as indirect parameter of crystallization properties of chocolate mass depending on milk fat fraction concentration and precrystallization temperature. The experiments were performed according to the factorial plan 32 (two factors on three levels) and the results are statistically treated.

Findings

The results showed that the optimal conditions for achieving the satisfactory tempering rate (optimal concentration of crystals in chocolate mass) are addition of 3 per cent low‐melting milk fat fraction and precrystallization temperature of 25°C.

Originality/value

The addition of high‐melting milk fat fraction slows down the chocolate mass crystallization more then low‐melting milk fat fraction. Investigated fraction influenced decreasing in solid fat content of chocolate regardless of precrystallization temperature.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

M. Jaffar, Munir H. Shah, N. Shaheen, A. Khaliq, Saadia R. Tariq, S. Manzoor and M. Saqib

Levels of 12 metals (Ca, K, Na, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni) were estimated in 19 different imported brands of unexpired and expired canned dry milk available…

Abstract

Levels of 12 metals (Ca, K, Na, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni) were estimated in 19 different imported brands of unexpired and expired canned dry milk available from local markets. The HNO3/HClO4‐based wet digestion method was used for the analysis of the samples by the FAAS technique under optimum analytical conditions. Of the macronutrients, Ca showed highest at 1,144 μg/g in the dry milk from Holland. In the case of micronutrients, Fe showed the maximum level at 119.15 μg/kg in the milk from UK. Cr dominated at 23.19 μg/kg compared with other heavy toxic trace elements. The following order of decreasing concentration was observed for both unexpired and expired milk: Ca > Na > K > Mg > Fe > Zn > Cr > Pb > Cu > Ni > Cd. All the trace elements were found to have 100 per cent incidence of occurrence. The expired milk samples showed enhanced levels of Fe, Zn, Cr and Pb by a factor of 1.2‐1.6 on average. The results of the metal contents were compared with those for fresh cow milk. The data were statistically evaluated to find bivariate correlation between the metals in pre‐ and post‐expiry milks.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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