Search results

1 – 10 of 573
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Mark Washburn and Kenji Klein

The purpose of this paper is to develop theory regarding reputation and legitimacy signaling by organizations in contested emerging fields characterized by category…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop theory regarding reputation and legitimacy signaling by organizations in contested emerging fields characterized by category ambiguity. Because impression management becomes increasingly important as category boundaries become fuzzy, the authors examine how highly participatory audiences in contested emerging fields respond to organizational attempts to seek acceptance and manage impressions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a database of web-based advertisements by 1,226 medical marijuana dispensaries, the authors test the effect that dispensary attempts to signal either legitimacy or reputation have on audience approval.

Findings

The authors find that audiences react differently to communication strategies intended to build reputation vs those intended to build legitimacy. Under conditions of highly contested category legitimation, audiences respond positively to signals of legitimacy but negatively to signals of reputation.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of category emergence and category building under conditions of contestation. The study adds to the growing body of work that suggests category creation involves unique collaborative processes between organizations and audiences, and the authors show that these processes constrain organizational attempts at impression management.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Zara Snapp and Jorge Herrera Valderrábano

This chapter explores the historical context of drug control in the United States, the ongoing regulation of the cannabis market at the State level and the role of the…

Abstract

This chapter explores the historical context of drug control in the United States, the ongoing regulation of the cannabis market at the State level and the role of the United States in the international negotiations related to the United Nations General Assembly Special Sessions (UNGASS) on drugs in 1998 and 2016. We continue by analysing the position, allies and activities of the United States before and during UNGASS 2016 to provide an understanding of possible scenarios related to the 2009 Political Declaration and Plan of Action review to take place via a High-level Ministerial Segment within the 2019 Commission on Narcotic Drugs meeting. While US drug policy is not expected to positively shift in the next few years, State-level regulation of cannabis is expected to continue and create pressure from below.

Details

Collapse of the Global Order on Drugs: From UNGASS 2016 to Review 2019
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-488-6

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Rohan Clarke

This paper aims to illuminate the diverging approaches to marijuana-related drug enforcement at the federal and state levels in the USA, which have facilitated a boom in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illuminate the diverging approaches to marijuana-related drug enforcement at the federal and state levels in the USA, which have facilitated a boom in the US medical cannabis industry (i.e. the “Green Rush”). It further sheds light on how the USA’ aggressive extraterritorial approach to anti-money laundering (AML) enforcement might simultaneously suppress the banking of cannabis-related businesses in Jamaica due to the lingering fear of de-risking.

Design/methodology/approach

An international and comparative legal and policy analysis was conducted of the nexus among shifting drug enforcement policies, AML laws and the banking of cannabis-related businesses.

Findings

This study found that the constitutional relationship between the US federal government and states has created a de facto comparative advantage for the US medical cannabis-related businesses that benefit from limited access to financial services. This was found to pose far-reaching implications for the banking and development of the Jamaican cannabis sector due to the dependence of the country’s financial institutions on correspondent banking relationships with the US banks that are regulated by federal AML statutes.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this paper is the first of its kind to examine the extraterritorial regulatory risks to the banking of cannabis-related businesses in Jamaica.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Case study
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Lorraine L. Taylor and Deborah L. Walker

Andrea Seid is responsible for tourism marketing in a destination management organization in Colorado. In her position, she faces a difficult decision of whether to…

Abstract

Synopsis

Andrea Seid is responsible for tourism marketing in a destination management organization in Colorado. In her position, she faces a difficult decision of whether to promote marijuana-related businesses on her website and in the local welcome centers.

Research methodology

Primary research took place through interviews with Andrea Seid and John Mace, a local business owner. All other data were collected from secondary sources.

Relevant courses and levels

This case would help students to apply concepts from courses such as: services marketing, tourism management, destination management and tourism development.

Theoretical bases

The decision at the root of the case is a real-world application of stakeholder theory.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Anna Waldstein

Domestically produced, high potency cannabis (often referred to as ‘skunk’ in the mainstream UK media) has become increasingly widespread in the UK. This paper considers…

Downloads
1078

Abstract

Domestically produced, high potency cannabis (often referred to as ‘skunk’ in the mainstream UK media) has become increasingly widespread in the UK. This paper considers whether the trend reflects an increased awareness of and desire for medical marijuana. Determining whether cannabis is a drug or a medicine depends on its objective physiological effects ‐ which may vary from one individual to another ‐ as well as how and why those effects are experienced. The medicinal and mind‐altering effects of cannabis are not easily separable for many cannabis users. The medicinal use of cannabis in Britain has waxed and waned since the early 19th century. Currently, the UK is at the cutting edge of the development of cannabis‐based pharmaceuticals, but criminalises people who choose to self‐medicate with herbal cannabis. We are living in a time of political, social and economic uncertainty, which threatens the stability of national healthcare systems. The broad‐ranging effects of cannabis on the human body and mind, combined with its relatively easy cultivation, make it a sustainable and effective alternative medicine. Research is needed, especially on the experiences of people who use cannabis to benefit, enrich and even prolong their lives.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Atte Cederqvist, Derek Sundén and Johan Wilenius

This chapter provides several up-to-date examples of failures in companies’ B2B operations and branding for the readers to learn from such mistakes and never repeat them…

Abstract

This chapter provides several up-to-date examples of failures in companies’ B2B operations and branding for the readers to learn from such mistakes and never repeat them. Usually managers look for best practices in order to develop their knowledge about a certain topic, but one should not disregard the value of learning from mistakes, which may be as useful if not more efficient than obtaining knowledge from best practices. The chapter examines what kind of B2B failures are likely to happen to companies in various industries and B2B branding situations and provides a detailed case of a blunder that occurred with the Finnish multinational IT services company Tieto. In addition to accentuating errors, the chapter goes further and tries to uncover the reasons why blunders occur and provides advices on how to avoid them and what to do when a mistake has already been made.

Details

Developing Insights on Branding in the B2B Context
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-276-9

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Stephanie Geiger-Oneto, Betsy D. Gelb and Travis Simkins

The purpose of this paper is to offers the authors’ perspective on a problem rarely considered by those making strategic decisions: conflicting laws at different levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offers the authors’ perspective on a problem rarely considered by those making strategic decisions: conflicting laws at different levels of jurisdiction, specifically those related to stigmatized products.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use as examples of product categories from marijuana to single-use plastic bags, describing the conflicting laws that add to costs for marketers and consumers.

Findings

The authors find that conflicting laws add to the uncertainty, legal expenses, and therefore, the cost of marketing a stigmatized product, whether stigmatized because of its impact on the environment, on health or on moral grounds.

Research limitations/implications

The examples are not exhaustive, but their implications are significant: that as state legislatures are preempting local bans, Congress may preempt state laws.

Originality/value

This paper adds one more complexity to decision-making in the area of products to offer and/or merger/acquisition decisions that may bring company products that face conflicting laws.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Raymond J. March, Adam G. Martin and Audrey Redford

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the distinctions and complementary of William Baumol and Israel Kirzner’s classifications of and insights into entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the distinctions and complementary of William Baumol and Israel Kirzner’s classifications of and insights into entrepreneurship, and thus providing a more complete taxonomy of the substance of entrepreneurial activity. This paper also attempts to clarify distinctions between unproductive and destructive entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper illustrates a more complete taxonomy of the substance of entrepreneurial activity by examining entrepreneurial innovation in drug markets both legal and illegal, identifying cases of productive, unproductive, superfluous, erroneous, destructive, and protective entrepreneurship.

Findings

This paper finds that the classifications of entrepreneurship (productive, superfluous, unproductive, erroneous, protective and destructive) put forth by Baumol, Kirzner, and the institutional entrepreneurship literature are complementary. While Baumol seeks to explain the disequilibrating tendencies of entrepreneurship, Kirzner seeks to explain the equilibrating tendencies of entrepreneurship within the institutional context.

Originality/value

This paper utilizes case studies from legal and illegal drug markets to uniquely and better explain the six cases of entrepreneurship. This paper also contributes to the literature by clearly articulating the complementarity of Baumolian and Kirznerian entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2014

Matthew Wood, Chris Welter, Kendall Artz and Steven W. Bradley

Entrepreneurship research has paid little attention to variance in entrepreneurial opportunities, instead choosing to treat them as homogenous. Thus, the field has failed…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship research has paid little attention to variance in entrepreneurial opportunities, instead choosing to treat them as homogenous. Thus, the field has failed to acknowledge that there are significant variations in means–ends conceptualizations giving rise to different types of opportunities. Further, researchers and educators have not fully considered that the type of opportunity being pursued has implications for which entrepreneurial actions are required to realize a successful outcome. We address these issues in this chapter by distinguishing means–ends combinations such that four types of opportunities – replication, reinterpretation, revelation, and revolution – are introduced. This matrix leads to propositions regarding differing actions that would be emphasized as a function of the type opportunity under consideration (e.g., legitimacy building, knowledge assimilation, market demand, and resource acquisition). The net effect is an improved understanding of how variations in means–ends conceptualizations influence how entrepreneurs interpret their particular opportunity, which in turn drives the actions they take as they attempt to turn their vision into reality. This improved understanding has important implications for entrepreneurship education and we suggests a number of possible changes to pedagogy that flow from our framework. We believe that these changes will bring added richness and value to the classroom.

Details

Innovative Pathways for University Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-497-8

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

1 – 10 of 573