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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Gary R. Potter and Caroline Chatwin

This article aims to discuss the use of the word “skunk” in contemporary discourse as short‐hand for premium quality, indoor‐grown cannabis. Skunk, as used in this way, is…

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255

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to discuss the use of the word “skunk” in contemporary discourse as short‐hand for premium quality, indoor‐grown cannabis. Skunk, as used in this way, is a contested term that many cannabis users reject. The purpose of the article is to draw attention to some practical implications of this semantic dispute for academic research and for policy development.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on qualitative data generated during an online survey project examining UK cannabis markets. Findings discussed are contextualised by reference to use of the word skunk in public discourse through the media and policy documents.

Findings

The uncritical use of the word “skunk” by researchers, the media and others can pose problems, particularly where the use and implied meaning of the word is rejected (as it is amongst a segment of the cannabis using population). Attempts to acquire or disseminate knowledge, or to develop or enact policy about cannabis use and distribution in the UK may encounter significant problems if attention is not paid to this issue.

Originality/value

The article offers a view of the impact of the increased and uncritical public use of the word “skunk” on those who may be of particular concern to policy makers and academic researchers: those who are most involved with cannabis (e.g. heavier users, cannabis connoisseurs and cannabis growers).

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Anthony Larsson

This paper aims to study the definition and formation of Skunk Works and how it may present itself as a viable theoretical alternative to other mainstream concepts of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the definition and formation of Skunk Works and how it may present itself as a viable theoretical alternative to other mainstream concepts of collective/corporate entrepreneurships, while dissecting some of the prevalent misconceptions of the extant literature regarding the application of Skunk Works.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a literature-based conceptual study that compares and differentiates various forms of group entrepreneurships as discussed in the academic debate.

Findings

This study shows how Skunk Works differs from other forms of collective/corporate entrepreneurship through its seven dimensions (isolation, customer needs, focus, planning, trusted project manager, cross-functional teams and leveraging overlaps) while challenging the dominant extant contenders of collective/corporate entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

Skunk Works remains a sustainable form of entrepreneurship, and it is still viable to consider it as a practical construct for smaller as well as larger organisations as a means of solving complicated innovative tasks requiring a multidisciplinary team with expert competence in a relatively quicker period of time.

Social implications

Organisations may take greater initiatives towards assembling entrepreneurial teams in the Skunk Work tradition.

Originality/value

As a means of understanding collective/corporate entrepreneurship, this study dissects some of the original fundamental cornerstones of Skunk Works entrepreneurship in an effort to present it as a viable alternative construct to the dominant construct of entrepreneurial orientation as well as other extant constructs.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Hao Ma

Luck remains an elusive theoretical concept in the business literature yet a fascinating practical phenomenon in business reality. In addition to effective strategic…

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9182

Abstract

Luck remains an elusive theoretical concept in the business literature yet a fascinating practical phenomenon in business reality. In addition to effective strategic maneuvering and well‐run internal management, luck often plays a non‐trivial role as a determinant of competitive advantage and firm performance. Understanding the various types of luck and the contextual conditions under which luck strikes is therefore expected to help a firm gain competitive advantage. This paper advances a typology of different scenarios of luck – pure luck, prepared luck, useful weeds, and skunk work – and expounds the strategic implications of these scenarios for the firm’s search for competitive advantage. Taking a proactive approach, it untangles the typical environmental sources of luck as well as the intra‐firm mechanisms and processes through which a firm could better induce, recognize, and exploit lucky incidents of innovations from useful weeds or skunk works.

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Management Decision, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Jeffrey Phillips

In any business process a firm begins with a concept or model of how it hopes to accomplish its goals to provide value to customers and participate in market successfully…

Abstract

In any business process a firm begins with a concept or model of how it hopes to accomplish its goals to provide value to customers and participate in market successfully. This model forms the basis of how the business is structured and organized, how it operates in the marketplace and its scope and limitations. In this article, we present the proposition that innovation, typically an unstructured initiative or task, requires its own model, and has a number of defined attributes. A successful innovation capability is based on defining these attributes and aligning them to the strategic goals of the organization and the intent or purpose of the innovation effort.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Anna Waldstein

Domestically produced, high potency cannabis (often referred to as ‘skunk’ in the mainstream UK media) has become increasingly widespread in the UK. This paper considers…

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1078

Abstract

Domestically produced, high potency cannabis (often referred to as ‘skunk’ in the mainstream UK media) has become increasingly widespread in the UK. This paper considers whether the trend reflects an increased awareness of and desire for medical marijuana. Determining whether cannabis is a drug or a medicine depends on its objective physiological effects ‐ which may vary from one individual to another ‐ as well as how and why those effects are experienced. The medicinal and mind‐altering effects of cannabis are not easily separable for many cannabis users. The medicinal use of cannabis in Britain has waxed and waned since the early 19th century. Currently, the UK is at the cutting edge of the development of cannabis‐based pharmaceuticals, but criminalises people who choose to self‐medicate with herbal cannabis. We are living in a time of political, social and economic uncertainty, which threatens the stability of national healthcare systems. The broad‐ranging effects of cannabis on the human body and mind, combined with its relatively easy cultivation, make it a sustainable and effective alternative medicine. Research is needed, especially on the experiences of people who use cannabis to benefit, enrich and even prolong their lives.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Gary Sutton

This article seeks to provide an insight into the work of an expert witness working in drug trials in Crown courts.

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to provide an insight into the work of an expert witness working in drug trials in Crown courts.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is a case study of a single expert witness, drawing on experiences over several years.

Findings

The evidence produced in court is subject to the personal limitations and organisational constraints of the experts involved. Prosecution often relies on unreliable and secretive sources. It is important to increase transparency and for a robust challenge to be made to some claims. Many experts are former police officers who are rarely objective or neutral, hence the need for independent experts from within the field.

Research limitations/implications

Personal experience cannot always be generalised so limits the information presented in this case study.

Practical implications

The role of expert witness is a career development opportunity for people working in the drugs and alcohol field.

Social implications

It is important to understand the subjective way in which testimony and evidence is produced.

Originality/value

This paper gives a rare insight into a key aspect of the legal process.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Peter Kawalek

This paper seeks to describe a “bubble strategy” to public sector change, based on the principles that a change initiative must be defensible and supportive of an…

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1489

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe a “bubble strategy” to public sector change, based on the principles that a change initiative must be defensible and supportive of an alternative, entrepreneurial culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is developed through an action research case in Salford City Council, through which theory from technology innovation, change management and other sources is explored.

Findings

The paper finds that the managers developed a dynamic process wherein their ability to defend the new change initiative was primary. This required “under‐the‐radar” tactics that allowed different elements of the change initiative to grow before they were assessed or adopted by the wider organisation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper speculates on the ways in which the characteristics of the “bubble” could be adopted elsewhere. However, as an action research case, restrictions on the generalisability of the evidence are noted.

Practical implications

The “bubble” strategy is set out in its constituent parts and is thereby available for adoption elsewhere.

Originality/value

The strategy employed in the case is not documented elsewhere. The paper utilizes technology innovation theory and related literature like “skunk works”, outside their intended private sector context.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Dave Crosswhite and Jorge Rufat‐Latre

Strategic innovation competence is critical to business success in the world today. How to develop this competence is an even more critical issue facing businesses today…

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1573

Abstract

Purpose

Strategic innovation competence is critical to business success in the world today. How to develop this competence is an even more critical issue facing businesses today. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explains how companies can solve these dilemmas as it explores relevant innovation theory and practice with several short case studies. Principles underlying the development of an innovation competence and an explanation of how companies can put these principles into practice to overcome the most common innovation challenges are also discussed.

Findings

The paper shows how ongoing, systematic innovation has become the only sustainable source of competitive advantage

Originality/value

This paper discusses how companies can put the principles of innovation and change into their business and make it work for them.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

1 – 10 of 261