Search results

1 – 10 of over 144000
Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Jihui Chen and Patrick Scholten

We study how price dispersion varies with product characteristics at a popular online price comparison site – Shopper.com. Our primary finding suggests that price…

Abstract

We study how price dispersion varies with product characteristics at a popular online price comparison site – Shopper.com. Our primary finding suggests that price dispersion in online markets varies with product characteristics and firm behavior. We also find evidence that the level of dispersion varies with the percent of firms listing price information in multiple categories. When the percent of firms listing prices in multiple categories is relatively high (low), price dispersion is low (high).

Details

Organizing the New Industrial Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-081-4

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Ellen Ceklic, Hideo Tohira, Judith Finn, Deon Brink, Paul Bailey, Austin Whiteside, Elizabeth Brown, Rudolph Brits and Stephen Ball

Traffic incidents vary considerably in their severity, and the dispatch categories assigned during emergency ambulance calls aim to identify those incidents in greatest…

Abstract

Purpose

Traffic incidents vary considerably in their severity, and the dispatch categories assigned during emergency ambulance calls aim to identify those incidents in greatest need of a lights and sirens (L&S) response. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dispatch categories could discriminate between those traffic incidents that do/do not require an L&S response.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective cohort study of ambulance records was conducted. The predictor variable was the Traffic/Transportation dispatch categories assigned by call-takers. The outcome variable was whether each incident required an L&S response. Possible thresholds for identifying dispatch categories that require an L&S response were developed. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each threshold.

Findings

There were 17,099 patients in 13,325 traffic incidents dispatched as Traffic/Transportation over the study period. “Possible death at scene” ‘had the highest odds (OR 22.07, 95% CI 1.06–461.46) and “no injuries” the lowest odds (OR 0.28 95% CI 0.14–0.58) of requiring an L&S response compared to the referent group. The area under the ROC curve was 0.65, 95% CI [0.64, 0.67]. It was found that Traffic/Transportation dispatch categories allocated during emergency ambulance calls had limited ability to discriminate those incidents that do/do not require an L&S response to the scene of a crash.

Originality/value

This research makes a unique contribution, as it considers traffic incidents not as a single entity but rather as a number of dispatch categories which has practical implications for those emergency medical services dispatching ambulances to the scene.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Péter Jacsó

EigenFactor service went through some changes in 2011 before issuing the most current edition (EF‐2010) following the release of the 2010 edition of the Journal Citation…

Abstract

Purpose

EigenFactor service went through some changes in 2011 before issuing the most current edition (EF‐2010) following the release of the 2010 edition of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR‐2010) in mid‐2011. Ranking journals by the EigenFactor Score (EFS) and the Article Influence Score (AIS) offered an additional pair of bibliometric indicators to assess the impact of journals in the (sub)disciplinary fields of the sciences and social sciences. In evaluating the clout, importance, and impact of journals it is essential to compare apples to apples, i.e. limiting the assessments to journals belonging to the same (sub)disciplinary areas. This paper aims to examine the quality of the subject categories created for EF‐2010 and of the JCR‐2010 subject categories as implemented within the EigenFactor services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compares the adequacy of the subject categories in the JCR‐2010 and EF‐2010, examining the assignment of 77 information and library science journals and 50 business/marketing journals to the 64 subject categories used in EF‐2010.

Findings

The study finds that EF‐2010 uses a very broad categorisation system of merely 64 subject categories along with the much more specific subject categories originally developed and enhanced for the JCR database of the Institute for Scientific Information (now Thomson‐Reuters). JCR‐2010 has four times as many categories than the former, and would offer a far more realistic comparison of the impact of comparable journals in EF‐2010 if the developers of the EigenFactor database had retained the assignment of the journals to the JCR subject categories. The inconsistency, inaccuracy and incompleteness of the journal classification practice in EF‐2010 creates a highly distorted picture of the standing of journals in their (sub)disciplinary leagues, and makes it very difficult for the users to reproduce the far more refined league lists of journals.

Originality/value

The paper describes the most serious limitations and errors in the classification of journals in the EF‐2010 edition.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Richard Hutchins

Discusses the research opportunities brought about by the adoption of category management in the food industry and suggests reasons why category management might be of…

Downloads
2570

Abstract

Discusses the research opportunities brought about by the adoption of category management in the food industry and suggests reasons why category management might be of interest to academics. Reviews contemporary research and proposes a multidisciplinary research agenda which crosses the academic‐industrial interface. Suggests four principal research themes: beneficiaries and benefits of category management; the process of organizational change; the management of categories; and the implications of category management adoption. Discusses these themes in the context of research already undertaken and details areas meriting closer investigation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Syed Tariq Anwar

Within a competitiveness perspective, the main purpose of this paper is to investigate and analyze franchise categories and changing profiles and trends of the franchising…

Downloads
1619

Abstract

Purpose

Within a competitiveness perspective, the main purpose of this paper is to investigate and analyze franchise categories and changing profiles and trends of the franchising industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data from The Franchising Handbook, the study investigates 1,464 franchisors in 67 franchise categories that encompass 445,314 franchisees. The work uses content analysis in the investigation of franchise categories.

Findings

The study finds that franchise categories tend to be diverse regarding their category issues, franchising fees, capital requirements, and category franchisees. The work also provides meaningful implications and future research directions.

Research limitations/implications

The author believes that fast‐growing mid‐sized and newly formed franchisors may need to be included in the survey from the USA and other countries. The study's implications are that the franchising industry requires new business models regarding franchising fees, capital, and sales that are critical in maintaining companies' competitiveness.

Practical implications

Franchisors should pay attention to those fast‐growing franchise categories that may become available in the coming years.

Originality/value

Within the areas of changing franchising and franchise categories, this work provides useful findings for researchers as well as practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Bronston T. Mayes, Dorothy Heide and Ephraim Smith

A survey was mailed to the deans of AACSB accredited schools and 50 per cent of the non‐accredited AACSB affiliates, to determine their perceptions of how the changes in…

Abstract

A survey was mailed to the deans of AACSB accredited schools and 50 per cent of the non‐accredited AACSB affiliates, to determine their perceptions of how the changes in accreditation criteria might affect their curricula and what methods might be used to make these changes. The sample was classified according to the Porter‐McKibbin categories and significant differences were found among these categories for perceived ease of accreditation; changes in programme quality; resource allocation changes; use of mission statements in decision making; curriculum component emphasis, and curriculum evaluation methods. While the overall amount of change expected in the next five years seems modest, the nature of the changes expected could have significant effects on the curricula of US business schools.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Lei Hou and Xue Pan

Experienced reviewers in general can produce high-quality product reviews, and thereby get more helpful votes. This paper explores the question that whether the depth and…

Abstract

Purpose

Experienced reviewers in general can produce high-quality product reviews, and thereby get more helpful votes. This paper explores the question that whether the depth and width of the reviewers' experience distribution have effects on the helpfulness of their reviews.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the restaurant review data from Yelp, the present paper classifies the restaurants in to different categories applying the Word2Vec technique, such as Asian or fast food. By evaluating the number of a user's historical reviews in a specific category, and the evenness of such distribution in different categories, the experience specialty and experience diversity are defined respectively.

Findings

The analysis shows that users specialised in a given category can produce more helpful reviews in that category. The users with diverse historical experience, i.e. have posted reviews for many categories, also can produce helpful reviews. In addition, the experience diversity shows a positive moderation effect on the influence of experience specialty. Thus, users with diverse experience while specialized in a particular category are the source of most helpful reviews.

Originality/value

While previous studies mostly consider the raw number of historical reviews as a reviewer's experience, we distinguish such experience by product category and focus on the width and depth of its distribution. The results not only shed lights on the mining of high-quality reviews and reviewers but also provide insights on the management of online review platforms and electronic marketing.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 6 January 2016

Stephanie A. Sell

In recent years, the field of comparative and international education (CIE) has experienced an outburst of self-reflective papers wherein comparativists study the nature…

Abstract

In recent years, the field of comparative and international education (CIE) has experienced an outburst of self-reflective papers wherein comparativists study the nature of the field and map its content. This study contributes to this trend by drawing attention to a previously unstudied aspect of CIE: its purpose. Using Arnove’s dimensions as a starting point to create five new purpose categories, four prominent CIE journals are surveyed to test whether the pragmatic history of CIE is evident in its current body of research. In this process, a complete and clear genetic mapping of the journals is created, which explores their similarities and differences, as well as the changes in their content over time. Findings indicate that the pragmatic purpose of CIE dominates, though it is primarily emancipatory and transformative in its prescription. Furthermore, articles rooted in specific situational contexts were more prominent than expected considering the comparative and international nature of the field.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2015
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-297-9

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Alex Bitektine and Robert Nason

The authors explore how entrepreneurs with limited resources legitimated (or failed to legitimate) a new organizational category in different jurisdictions in Canada…

Abstract

The authors explore how entrepreneurs with limited resources legitimated (or failed to legitimate) a new organizational category in different jurisdictions in Canada despite severe resistance. The authors identify three meso-level domains of institutional action (public, administrative, and legal), where actors intervene to change their macro-institutional environment. The findings suggest that these domains mediate the relationship between micro-level agency and macro-level institutions. The authors describe how macro-level consensus about the category legitimacy emerges through a competition between judgments embedded in different discourses and how a particular discourse attains validity, forcing other actors to change their initial unfavorable legitimacy judgments and recognize the category’s legitimacy.

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2003

Philip R Beaulieu

When decision makers encounter new assurance services that can be customized for individual clients, they must include them in their pre-existing categorization of…

Abstract

When decision makers encounter new assurance services that can be customized for individual clients, they must include them in their pre-existing categorization of assurance, a cognitive task known as postclassification. This paper draws upon three literatures (classification research in accounting, theory of assurance, and cognitive psychology) in order to suggest how this task might be modeled and studied empirically, using the example of SysTrust™. The role of a necessary condition for successful postclassification called the category use effect (Ross, 2000), in which decision makers are reminded of pre-existing categories when they learn to use new categories, is explained.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-231-3

1 – 10 of over 144000