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Article

Meera Kenkarasseril Joseph

Information and communication technology (ICT) is a powerful tool and an enabler of economic growth in under‐developed areas. ICTs have played an important role in women's…

Abstract

Purpose

Information and communication technology (ICT) is a powerful tool and an enabler of economic growth in under‐developed areas. ICTs have played an important role in women's development and provided opportunities for empowerment. ICTs have the potential to exchange information and empower marginalised communities. The purpose of this paper is to cover Habermas‐based critical theory to understand the politics of women's empowerment through the use of ICTs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the role of ICTs in developing marginalised women from the coastal areas of southern India. The paper is based on a qualitative study and presents a set of questionnaires developed specifically to assess women's development through the use of ICTs.

Findings

This study presents Habermasian based approach to address women's developmental goals.

Originality/value

The paper provides meaningful discussion on ICT for Women's Development (ICT4WD) and explores theories related to the feminist inquiry.

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Article

Marek Rymsza

– The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of social enterprises in building social capital and strengthening social bonds.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of social enterprises in building social capital and strengthening social bonds.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on the comparative method. The author compares the development of social entrepreneurship of the “old” social economy (born on the turn of nineteenth and twentieth centuries), and of the “new” social economy (developing on the turn of twentieth and twenty-first centuries); and the functioning of social enterprises of two kinds: work integration social enterprises (WISEs) and community-based social enterprises (CBSEs). Moreover, he distinguishes between economic and social re-integration; and reciprocity and vertical inclusion.

Findings

The paper presents WISEs and CBSEs as tools of two different activation programmes: WISEs improve the employability of individuals who are marginalized in the labour market, while CBSEs serve as vehicles for the socio-economic development of the marginalized communities and territories. Furthermore, the author clarifies two methods of inclusion: through strengthening horizontal social ties (realized mainly by CBSEs, with their mutuality principle as a basis for building relations between participants) and building vertical social bonds (mainly by WISEs, based on the “inclusion of excluded” formula).

Research limitations/implications

The paper stresses the importance of focusing research into social entrepreneurship on the role of social enterprises in shaping social bonds as well as using and producing of social capital of two main types: bonding and bridging.

Practical implications

Recommendations for managing social enterprises as hybrid entities. The author argues that the most effective approach (in producing social value-added) is to combine the formula of the re-integration of individuals excluded from the labour market with the efforts to develop the whole local communities from marginalized territories.

Originality/value

The author uses sociological perspectives in analysing economic entities and activation policies.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Lucy Bailey and Simon John Williams

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the authors’ experiences of conducting research with refugees and asylum seekers in Malaysia over multiple research projects in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the authors’ experiences of conducting research with refugees and asylum seekers in Malaysia over multiple research projects in order to identify limitations to current procedures for receiving ethical approval for a study. It argues that the moral complexity of working with marginalized and excluded groups is not reflected in existing approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Ensuring that research is ethical is integral to any empirical study, using any research design. Procedures for ensuring ethics have been developed by professional bodies across many academic fields, predominantly drawing on western legal frameworks and conceptions of agency. However, these procedures may not have applicability to certain cultural, social and political settings. The discussion in this paper focuses on devising ethical approaches for research participants from marginalized and excluded communities in diverse parts of the world, including those with no possibility of legal recourse.

Findings

Problems with the use of established procedures for four aspects of ethical research are identified, namely, access and gatekeepers; consent; reciprocity; and confidentiality.

Originality/value

The paper develops a framework for continuous ethical reflexivity. It argues that this framework should replace the established procedural approach to ethics, approved by an Institutional Review Board or ethics committee. Instead, the IRB should assign an ethical mentor who is jointly responsible with the researcher for ensuring research ethics through the use of the framework.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Book part

Suhaib Riaz and Israr Qureshi

We draw on an in-depth investigation into the phenomenon of community radio in India to identify the emergence of an institutional logic in a field. We delineate five…

Abstract

We draw on an in-depth investigation into the phenomenon of community radio in India to identify the emergence of an institutional logic in a field. We delineate five stages of emergence, starting with problematization of dominant logics and ending with formation of an institutionally complex field. Further, we highlight how such a process results in organizational forms that reflect ongoing struggles among dominant logics and the emerging logic. We contribute to neoinstitutional studies on the emergence of social objects and also draw the attention of emergence theorists to the contested manner in which emergence takes place in the social world.

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Article

Brittany Paloma Fiedler, Rosan Mitola and James Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an academic library at one of the most diverse universities in the country responded to the 2016 election through the newly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an academic library at one of the most diverse universities in the country responded to the 2016 election through the newly formed Inclusion and Equity Committee and through student outreach.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper details the context of the 2016 election and the role of social justice in librarianship. It offers ideas for how library diversity committees can address professional development, recruitment and retention efforts and cultural humility. It highlights student outreach efforts to support marginalized students, educate communities and promote student activism. Finally, it offers considerations and suggestions for librarians who want to engage in this work.

Findings

This paper shows that incorporating social justice, diversity, equity and inclusion requires individuals taking action. If institutions want to focus on any of these issues, they need to formally include them in their mission, vision and values as well as in department goals and individual job descriptions. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas University Libraries fully supports this work, but most of the labor is done by a small number of people. Unsustainable practices can cause employee burnout and turnover resulting in less internal and external efforts to support diversity.

Originality/value

Most of the previous literature focuses either on internal activities, such as professional development and committees, or on student-focused activities, such as outreach events, displays and instruction. This paper is one comprehensive review of both kinds of activities.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Vanessa Kitzie, Travis Wagner and A. Nick Vera

This qualitative study explores how discursive power shapes South Carolina lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA+) communities' health…

Abstract

Purpose

This qualitative study explores how discursive power shapes South Carolina lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA+) communities' health information practices and how participants resist this power.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 28 LGBTQIA+ community leaders from South Carolina engaged in semi-structured interviews and information world mapping–a participatory arts-based elicitation technique–to capture the context underlying how they and their communities create, seek, use and share health information. We focus on the information world maps for this paper, employing situational analysis–a discourse analytic method for visual data–to analyze them.

Findings

Six themes emerged describing how discursive power operates both within and outside of LGBTQIA+ communities: (1) producing absence, (2) providing unwanted information, (3) commoditizing LGBTQIA+ communities, (4) condensing LGBTQIA+ people into monoliths; (5) establishing the community's normative role in information practices; (6) applying assimilationist and metronormative discourses to information sources. This power negates people's information practices with less dominant LGBTQIA+ identities and marginalized intersectional identities across locations such as race and class. Participants resisted discursive power within their maps via the following tactics: (1) (re)appropriating discourses and (2) imagining new information worlds.

Originality/value

This study captures the perspectives of an understudied population–LGBTQIA+ persons from the American South–about a critical topic–their health–and frames these perspectives and topics within an informational context. Our use of information world mapping and situational analysis offers a unique and still underutilized set of qualitative methods within information science research.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Book part

Donna Braquet

The chapter compiles a glossary of key lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) terms and concepts relevant in the twenty-first century that a progressive…

Abstract

The chapter compiles a glossary of key lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) terms and concepts relevant in the twenty-first century that a progressive librarian and information professional should be aware of. These are categorized based on gender, sex, and gender identity; sexual and romantic orientation; LGBTQ+ rights and social justice; and outdated and offensive terms. It also briefly explores support for LGBTQ+ patrons through library-based scenarios and provides the contemporary professional important questions to consider in response to the difficult situations represented. Finally, the chapter provides a listing of 25 American LGBTQ+ web-based resources with annotations for librarians to become LGBTQ+ allies. These are categorized according to LGBTQ+ advocacy, youth, legal issues, policy and research, and libraries and archives.

Details

LGBTQ+ Librarianship in the 21st Century: Emerging Directions of Advocacy and Community Engagement in Diverse Information Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-474-9

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Article

Omid Sabbaghi and Gerald F. Cavanagh, S.J.

The study aims to provide an empirical investigation of social enterprises in the context of experiential learning. Specifically, the study aims to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to provide an empirical investigation of social enterprises in the context of experiential learning. Specifically, the study aims to investigate the interplay between faith-based principles and the processes of opportunity recognition and exploitation through an in-depth, qualitative study of social enterprises offered through the Global Social Benefit Institute (GSBI).

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, student experiences with social entrepreneurship are examined and their subsequent reflections are analyzed. Applying the Gioia methodology to the sample of student reflection data, this study enriches the growing literature on sense-making by looking closely at how student entrepreneurs engage their own faith-based education in helping their teams, beneficiaries and stakeholders “make sense” of a social change opportunity.

Findings

This study finds evidence of variability in the elaboration of the faith-based principles when sampling on the social needs of affection, behavioral confirmation and status.

Originality/value

The results suggest a role for faith-based sense-making when confronting the realities of social change opportunities.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Book part

Matthew Aruch, Ana Loja and James B. Sanders

Responding to local, regional and international demands and initiatives, the government of Ecuador has rolled out an innovative program Sistema Integral de Tecnologías

Abstract

Responding to local, regional and international demands and initiatives, the government of Ecuador has rolled out an innovative program Sistema Integral de Tecnologías para la Escuela y la Comunidad (SíTEC) to place information, and communication technologies (ICTs) into the hands of students, teachers, and other educational institutions. SíTEC draws upon several elements of social entrepreneurship and has successfully reached some of the most regionally remote and culturally diverse communities in the country. The SíTEC program is emblematic of many of the criteria set forth regarding social entrepreneurship including the vision of leadership, the focus on a social mission and the importance of innovation in partnership and resource allocation. This study looks at survey and interview data from the Shiña community teachers and school leaders to determine the effects of the SíTEC program and the availability and use of ICTs in schools, SíTEC has equipped public schools with computers, projectors, digital boards, and Internet. Additionally, SíTEC organizes training courses on ICTs for public school teachers and provides schools with educational software available in Spanish, Kichwa, Shuar, and English. While there is still much work to be done, SíTEC and the associated partnerships and programs are beginning to have impact in their specified outcomes. Creative partnerships developed within the Ministry of Education, Office of Bilingual Education, Shiña community have allowed for communication and exchange of knowledge and resources across multiple partners. This chapter explores SíTEC as an innovative government-based program that meets targeted social outcomes in ICTs and education.

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Book part

Joe Macdonald

Trans theory (also known as transgender studies) is a rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field in which activism, scholarship and lived experience are coalescing around…

Abstract

Trans theory (also known as transgender studies) is a rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field in which activism, scholarship and lived experience are coalescing around questions of embodiment, personhood, and intersections of race/ethnicity/class/ability/gender/sexuality. Trans-themed research, whether explicitly located in trans theory or not, is a growing area of academic exploration. As a trans researcher and trans person, I am interested in two questions: how does autoethnography fit within trans and queer theory, and how can people who do not live in trans communities undertake ethical trans-related research? A symbolic interactionist perspective informs my understanding of trans theory and the social construction of identity and embodiment. I explore my own femme transmasculinity through autoethnography, and also consider my experience interviewing other trans people as part of researching masculinity. I suggest that researchers who are not trans (who are cisgendered, meaning they identify with the sex/gender they were assigned at birth) must accept that trans people have what Talia Bettcher (2009a, 2009b) terms First Person Authority over their embodiment, experience, and narratives. Having established this, I examine self-identification and intersubjective recognition in relation to my own experience of femme transmasculinity, asking what is femme incoherence and how does this relate to queer and trans theory/politics?

Details

40th Anniversary of Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-783-2

Keywords

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