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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2021

Mathew Nyashanu

The paper aims to show the impact of insider/outsider researcher positionality and the lessons from researching the social construction of HIV stigma and sexual…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to show the impact of insider/outsider researcher positionality and the lessons from researching the social construction of HIV stigma and sexual health-seeking behaviour within black sub-Sahara African communities (BSSA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a reflection on the impact of researcher positionality based on lessons learnt following a research study on the social construction of HIV stigma and sexual health-seeking behaviour within BSSA communities.

Findings

Researcher positionality has a direct impact on the quality and nature of study outcomes. Depending on the nature and circumstances of a given research study, the researcher status in terms of position (insider or outsider) can be dynamic and instrumental in the level of participation by research participants. In this paper, the authors consider three important interdependent aspects central to conducting research including researcher identity, research participants and the research topic to assess the impact of researcher status on the quality and nature of the information provided by the research participants.

Originality/value

A researcher who is viewed as both an insider/outsider can either positively or negatively influenced the quality and nature of the information given by the research participants.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2021

Ali AlQahtany

The purpose of this paper is to assess the nature of gated communities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) focusing on the experiences of residents from different gated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the nature of gated communities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) focusing on the experiences of residents from different gated communities in the Dammam Metropolitan Area (DMA). It seeks to assess the socio-economic background of such communities and find out why people choose to live in gated communities and their perceptions of such housing patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaire survey technique was used in this study to achieve the main purpose. The study used the triangulation method, which includes both qualitative and quantitative techniques as the most appropriate approach to be adopted. Qualitative data was analyzed using content analysis, while statistical analysis was performed to analyze quantitative data.

Findings

The findings of the study highlight that although gated communities are physically closed by walls and gates, it is distinguished by good social relations not only among their residents but even with the external surroundings, which makes these communities more attractive. Of course, this contrasts to some extent with the prevailing thinking that such communities live in a state of social isolation.

Research limitations/implications

The ideas of people who live outside gated communities are very important, however, it was not explored in this study due to time limitations. So, future research could focus on citizens’ perceptions of this type of urban settlement.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study assessing the nature of gated communities in KSA by focusing on the experiences of residents of different gated communities in DMA. Only a few studies have been done in this regard, so this research paper was conducted to bridge this research gap and build upon the literature.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2021

Amy Beardmore, Penny Beynon, Christine Crabbe, Carol Fry, Jan Fullforth, Jeremy Groome, Eddy Knasel, Jill Turner, Christopher Orlik, Matthew Jones and Jo White

International attention is increasingly turning to the challenge of creating age-friendly environments. This study aims to examine the application of asset-based…

Abstract

Purpose

International attention is increasingly turning to the challenge of creating age-friendly environments. This study aims to examine the application of asset-based approaches in undertaking community development projects with older people. The paper intends to share the learning that may be useful when designing community development projects for older people in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This study followed a multiple project case study design, with a focus on project delivery practices. It was undertaken as a co-production exercise involving university researchers and trained older volunteer community researchers (CRs). Over 18–24 months of qualitative research was conducted in relation to six area-based urban projects between 2018 and 2020.

Findings

There were five leading themes as follows: mapping and building on assets in highly localised settings; creating governance and direction through steering groups; developing activities with diverse groups of older people; reaching isolated and lonely older people; building local capacity to embed sustainability.

Practical implications

The effectiveness of assets-based approaches in promoting age-friendly agendas appears to be contingent on the values, skills, capacity and resourcing of delivery agencies, alongside wider public sector investment in communities. Diversity and inequalities amongst older people need to be taken into account and community development that specifically focuses on older people needs to be balanced with the whole population and intergenerational practice.

Originality/value

This paper provides an empirical account of the practical application of assets practices specifically in the context of the age-friendly community agenda. The co-production method brings together insights from academic and volunteer older CRs.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Quentin Grossetti, Cedric du Mouza, Nicolas Travers and Camelia Constantin

Social network platforms are considered today as a major communication mean. Their success leads to an unprecedented growth of user-generated content; therefore, finding…

Abstract

Purpose

Social network platforms are considered today as a major communication mean. Their success leads to an unprecedented growth of user-generated content; therefore, finding interesting content for a given user has become a major issue. Recommender systems allow these platforms to personalize individual experience and increase user engagement by filtering messages according to user interest and/or neighborhood. Recent research results show, however, that this content personalization might increase the echo chamber effect and create filter bubbles that restrain the diversity of opinions regarding the recommended content.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this paper is to present a thorough study of communities on a large Twitter data set that quantifies the effect of recommender systems on users’ behavior by creating filter bubbles. The authors further propose their community-aware model (CAM) that counters the impact of different recommender systems on information consumption.

Findings

The authors propose their CAM that counters the impact of different recommender systems on information consumption. The study results show that filter bubbles effects concern up to 10% of users and the proposed model based on the similarities between communities enhance recommendations.

Originality/value

The authors proposed the CAM approach, which relies on similarities between communities to re-rank lists of recommendations to weaken the filter bubble effect for these users.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2021

Emma O’Brien, BOJANA ĆULUM ILIĆ, Anete Veidemane, Davide Dusi, Thomas Farnell and Ninoslav Šćukanec Schmidt

This paper aims to examine the development and piloting of a novel European framework for community engagement (CE) in higher education, which has been purposefully…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the development and piloting of a novel European framework for community engagement (CE) in higher education, which has been purposefully designed to progress the CE agenda in a European context.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed framework was co-created through the European Union (EU)-funded project towards a European framework for community engagement in higher education (TEFCE). The TEFCE Toolbox is an institutional self-reflection framework that centres on seven thematic dimensions of CE. This paper follows the development of the TEFCE Toolbox through empirical case study analysis of four European universities and their local communities.

Findings

The findings in this paper indicate that the TEFCE Toolbox facilitates context-specific applications in different types of universities and socioeconomic environments. Incorporating insights from engagement practitioners, students and community representatives the TEFCE Toolbox was successfully applied in universities with diverse profiles and missions. The process facilitated the recognition of CE achievements and the identification of potential areas for improvement.

Originality/value

Despite a range of international initiatives, there remains an absence of initiatives within the European higher education area that focus on developing tools to comprehensively support CE. The TEFCE Toolbox and case-study analysis presented in this paper address this gap in knowledge. The broader societal contribution and social responsibility of higher education have become increasingly prominent on the European agenda. The TEFCE Toolbox represents an innovative, robust and holistic European framework with the potential to support universities in reflecting upon their pursuit of addressing grand societal challenges, whilst promoting CE.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Ming Chi, Paul Harrigan and Yongshun Xu

Online service brand communities (OBCs) are an essential services marketing channel and relationship marketing tool, in which social capital (SC) is a critical success…

Abstract

Purpose

Online service brand communities (OBCs) are an essential services marketing channel and relationship marketing tool, in which social capital (SC) is a critical success factor. Underpinned in social identity and social exchange theories, this paper aims to explore the effects of SC on customer brand engagement (CBE), considering the roles of collective psychological ownership (CPO), customer citizenship behaviour (CCB) and perceived community support (PCS).

Design/methodology/approach

The research model was tested using survey data from 256 participants; 137 from the Xiaomi Community and 119 from the Huawei Fan Club. Partial least squares-structural equation modelling analysis was used.

Findings

SC drives CBE. CPO and CCB are important mediators, whilst PCS is an important moderator.

Practical implications

Brand marketers need to foster SC in OBCs to achieve the maximum level of customer engagement. The authors provide recommendations as to how to build structural, relational and cognitive SC, as well as CPO, CCB and PCS. In short, brand marketers need to foster an interactive, empowering and supportive environment.

Originality/value

The authors further service research around the humanisation of technology. Specifically, OBCs are social spaces for brands and customers, and a key enabler of relationship marketing principles, such as CBE. The authors test the roles of structural, cognitive and relational SC in engagement in OBCs, through CPO and CCB. This holistic picture of engagement in OBCs is an important foundation for future service research.

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2021

Oluseyi Adebowale and Fredrick Simpeh

The increase in enrolment into higher education and the inadequate student housing in educational institutions has led to the growth of off-campus private student housing…

Abstract

Purpose

The increase in enrolment into higher education and the inadequate student housing in educational institutions has led to the growth of off-campus private student housing in Nigeria. Studentification as a research area has received attention in most countries in the global North, whereas there is dearth of studies on studentification in Nigeria. Therefore, this paper aims to examine the effects of studentification on the residents of selected Nigerian communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an exploratory research strategy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gather qualitative data from respondents, who were landlords and indigenous tenants of the host communities of two tertiary institutions. The data collected were analysed by means of the thematic analysis technique.

Findings

It became evident that studentification has some effects on the communities. Significant positive effects are business patronage and liveliness, while socio-economic-related factors, which include indecent clothing and theft, were noted as the most significant negative factors.

Practical implications

Implementing the outcomes of this study will contribute to promoting societal ethical values and economic prosperity of the communities.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to building the body of knowledge on the effect of studentification in the Nigerian context.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Grzegorz Leszczyńsk, Tibor Mandjak, Tihamér Margitay and Marek Zieliński

This paper aims to introduce the concept of business paradigm to conceptualize and explain differences in business interaction patterns in the IMP research.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce the concept of business paradigm to conceptualize and explain differences in business interaction patterns in the IMP research.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of the interaction and the concepts related to and driven from it describe the business at both a general level. At the same time, the IMP points out the uniqueness of business interactions. This paper addresses the specific lies between the general and the particular by referring to various patterns of interactions. To close that gap, this paper implies the Kuhnian philosophy of science to conceptualize the business paradigm.

Findings

The business paradigm is a socially constructed collective term. It simultaneously captures the cognitive (what business is and what rules it has) and social (business community) dimensions of the actor’s behavior and actions. It has two interdependent dimensions: cognitive and social. It determines how the actors view and do business, and it explains the variations of interactions.

Research limitations/implications

Not applicable as it is a conceptual paper.

Practical implications

Not applicable as it is a conceptual paper.

Social implications

Not applicable as it is a conceptual paper.

Originality/value

The concept of the business paradigm is a theoretical extension of the IMP actor’s theory. The dimensions of the business paradigm capture the psychological and sociological characteristics of the business actor. The business paradigm application provides an opportunity to find that business can be different because actors in various communities have various views on what business is and how it should be properly run. Adding the business paradigm concept to the IMP theory implies strengthening the theory explanation power because the interaction explains the business’s general characteristics. The business relationship explains the business’s unique features, and the business paradigm explains the various interaction patterns.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Chien Hsiang Liao

This study aims to not only develop measurements of preferential attachment and homophily mechanisms based on their definitions and network theory but also examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to not only develop measurements of preferential attachment and homophily mechanisms based on their definitions and network theory but also examine the associations among these network mechanisms, community commitment, knowledge sharing and community citizenship behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 250 valid questionnaires are collected to examine the hypothesized associations. These hypotheses are examined by using partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings reveal both mechanisms are beneficial to develop new entrants’ emotional attachment to a virtual community, thereby motivating knowledge sharing and community altruistic behavior. The results contribute some practical and theoretical implications that are very helpful for the conceptualization of network mechanisms, community development, relationship management and incentives for extra-role behavior.

Originality/value

The literature on the link between network selection mechanisms and knowledge sharing remains unknown. This study is the pioneer to disclose this unknown association and examine the impacts of preferential attachment and homophily network mechanisms.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Joanne Pérodin, Zelalem Adefris, Mayra Cruz, Nahomi Matos Rondon, Leonie Hermantin, Guadalupe De la Cruz, Nazife Emel Ganapati and Sukumar Ganapati

This paper aims to call for change in disaster research through a metis-based approach that values practical skills and knowledge (vs technical knowledge) derived from…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to call for change in disaster research through a metis-based approach that values practical skills and knowledge (vs technical knowledge) derived from responding to ongoing changes in the natural and human environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on metis from Miami-Dade County that is prone to an array of climate-related disasters. Metis is supplemented by a review of secondary sources (e.g. newspaper articles, government reports).

Findings

There is a need to reconceptualize disaster phases in disaster research—preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation. For many members of marginalized communities of color, this paper depicts preparedness and mitigation as luxuries and response as a time of worry about financial obligations and survival after the disaster. It suggests that even communities that are not on a hurricane's path could have post-disaster experiences. It also highlights ongoing risks to marginalized communities' physical and mental well-being that are in addition to the mental health impacts of the disaster during the recovery phase.

Originality/value

This paper's originality is twofold: (1) underlining the importance of metis, a less studied and understood concept in disaster risk reduction, prevention and management literature and (2) questioning disaster researchers' technical knowledge with respect to each of the four disaster phases in light of metis.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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