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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Manoj Joshi, Shailja Dixit and Amit Sinha

The purpose of this case study is to explore enterprise creation and explore the entrepreneurship process, which necessitates entrepreneurial recognition and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to explore enterprise creation and explore the entrepreneurship process, which necessitates entrepreneurial recognition and entrepreneurial orientation. The case also investigates how an entrepreneurial firm appreciates the importance of innovative practices for an organisational growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The case is based on primary research, secondary information, followed by testing the case several times and plugging case gaps. To authenticate information, multiple sources have been used in a time frame of over one year.

Findings

This case clearly demonstrates ability by an entrepreneur towards opportunity recognition, pro-activeness, engaging innovative skills and a capacity to undertake risks.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on observations of one company and research carried through secondary sources, which may limit the theory creation.

Practical implications

The accomplishment of the firm is attributed in accepting opportunities and potentially utilising its strengths towards growth. The case reflects, how Ajay, the founder of a Start-up ‘Comfort and Shelter’, intrinsically motivated and with prior knowledge in the financial services sector, was able to translate opportunities effectively via his orientation skills. Besides this in his entrepreneurial journey, Ajay was able to scale the business by continuously orienting his start-up towards customer orientation.

Social implications

It is imperative to understand social needs of individuals, hereby in this case need for affordable homes. An entrepreneur can be driven by social needs and create a profitable enterprise.

Originality/value

The case is original and reflects entrepreneurial journey of an individual as well as that of an enterprise.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Manoj Joshi

The case aims around transition and threats to survival in a brick kiln family business. Second, it stimulates an understanding on the need toward collective decision…

Abstract

Purpose

The case aims around transition and threats to survival in a brick kiln family business. Second, it stimulates an understanding on the need toward collective decision making by the family during the maturity stage of the family business. The purpose of this paper besides addressing entrepreneurship is to examine the “family-ness” in a family business and its benefits, the transition management issues and to understand the difficulties in handling conflicts during succession and transition cycle in a closely held family business.

Design/methodology/approach

The case is based on primary research, which is exploratory and secondary information followed by testing the case several times. To authenticate information, multiple sources of information with individual interviews both structured and unstructured at different levels have been used in a time frame of over one year.

Findings

The competency of the business purely lies in the quality of the product, utilization of market opportunity, harnessing capability, honesty and complete involvement in business. Undoubtedly, the family business has reflected growth but its existence in near future is doubtful due to certain exogenous uncontrollable factors, such as restriction by government regulation. The subsequent generation desires to actively participate in the family business. However, it is constrained by the new government regulations and the business life cycle. Thus, the family is reluctantly compelled to start focusing on newer alternatives or business ideas. Transitions, both in business and in family, have posed a challenge to the founder. Should the family continue in the same business with added constraints or the next generation starts building on a new idea as an option and spin-off from existing family business? These are scenarios for trade-offs.

Research limitations/implications

The case is restricted to transition in business and in family, within a traditional family business of brick kilns. It is about a strategic choice impending with the founder and his siblings. Interpretations may be connected with related family businesses; however, riders exist, as different firms falling under different industry verticals undergo unique scenarios.

Practical implications

The outcome of the research-based case study shall assist entrepreneurs in the brick kiln industry to understand transition issues and challenges imposed upon due to changing government regulations.

Social implications

Implications exist for practitioners who may like to anticipate conflict arising due to transition and have mitigation techniques in place.

Originality/value

The case is original, while the new generation is looking to switch or diversify the business.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2022

Balvinder Shukla, Tahir Sufi, Manoj Joshi and R. Sujatha

The COVID-19 crisis has affected almost all the global sectors. The hotel industry, however, was hit hardest challenging the leadership. This study, therefore, attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 crisis has affected almost all the global sectors. The hotel industry, however, was hit hardest challenging the leadership. This study, therefore, attempts to explore the challenges hospitality leadership in India face to navigate the crisis. The study additionally addresses how leaders manage the expectations of key stakeholders; communicate hard decisions with employees, pursue strategies for revival and explores the role of technology to survive the crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a qualitative approach involving structured interviews with 16 senior hospitality leaders consisting of CEO, vice president, general managers, directors, entrepreneur and general managers from various organisations like hotels, restaurant chains, food services and facilities management services. Data were content analysed involving coding techniques.

Findings

The leadership challenges included making customers and employees feel safe, optimising operations, agility and resilience of leaders, maintaining a balance between stakeholders, managing employee stress and ensuring cash reserves. The study found that leaders manage the expectation of various stakeholders by maintaining balance, demonstrating empathy and agility. The hard decisions are communicated with the employees through involvement, empathy and alleviating stress.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes by identifying twelve themes from the participants' responses under five major themes-labelled as leadership challenges, managing stakeholders, communicating with the employees, the role of technology and best practices of surviving the crisis. Future research can be conducted on such sub-themes in different countries.

Practical implications

As the tourism industry in India is recovering after the second wave, the governments along with all stakeholders, must launch special events for promoting the tourism sector. Safety measures like making vaccination certificates for all tourists and employees of the tourism sector should be made mandatory. Further, special certification following the COVID-19 protocol needs to be introduced for hotels and catering establishments. A fund generated from the sector's direct tax contribution needs to be established to support the employees.

Social implications

The study has several social implications. The study results can unite all industry stakeholders to shape the post-pandemic era through collaboration. Empathetic leadership can take the industry out of chaos by balancing the interests of the various stakeholders of society. The pandemic has proven that we all are vulnerable to risks and challenges; leaders have a vital role in taking proactive steps to ensure that such uncertainties do not cause unprecedented damage.

Originality/value

This study expanded the research on the hospitality leadership challenges in managing crises in the backdrop of the crisis caused by COVID-19 pandemic. The conceptual model, variables, themes and sub-themes utilised are original contributions to the hospitality literature.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Manoj Joshi and Apoorva Srivastava

Start-ups, entrepreneurship, innovation and innovative practices, risks, uncertainties, differentiation, internationalization, competition, business models…

Abstract

Subject area

Start-ups, entrepreneurship, innovation and innovative practices, risks, uncertainties, differentiation, internationalization, competition, business models, operationalizing and implementing strategy.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for MBA students.

Case overview

Vinay moved to the capital city of a Northern Indian state, which also happened to be a commercial hub, after his family business failed. The family succumbed to living in a room without electricity and doors. Vinay had dreamt of establishing his own business empire by being a successful entrepreneur. Steered by this intent, he established a pharmaceutical company with the name of Ayuvayur Pharmaceuticals. The challenge was to establish an innovative Ayurveda-based pharmaceutical products-based firm and to build a leading business empire with a customer focus. Progress was not smooth and the challenges ahead multiplied. Despite his ability to cope with barriers, risks and uncertainties, Vinay and his business, was challenged to grow globally and emerge from its nascent structure. How should the business expand?

Expected learning outcomes

Students can discover the following key learning points: how an enterprise is born; the importance of entrepreneurial recognition and orientation; the lead characteristics of an entrepreneur; how a start-up is born despite the unfamiliarity of the entrepreneur with the field he enters; the role of innovation in a small enterprise; and the risks, barriers, uncertainties and challenges associated with entrepreneurial activity.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Manoj Joshi and Apoorva Srivastava

Entrepreneurship, strategy, family business.

Abstract

Subject area

Entrepreneurship, strategy, family business.

Study level/applicability

MBA, PhD (Mgmt)

Case overview

DK Dies and Tools was set up initially as a tool room by its founder Krishna Verma. It manufactured machine parts, sheet metal tools, jigs and fixtures, plastic/rubber moulds and metal fabrications. The firm came to be known as DK Exports (henceforth DKX) when it was professionalized in the year 2003 for merchant exporting. Lately, after the founder's demise, professionalization had become a dire need when the firm faced with loss of customers, the market share was taken over by the Chinese, workers' expectations had risen, poor internal communications, search for dynamic capabilities and finally a need to diversify had arisen. Unexpected death of the founder had pushed the firm into doldrums. It was because of the founder's relationship and reputation in the market that the business prospered. Unfortunately, the tacit knowledge he possessed could not be handed over to his son Kunal, which led to complexes in business. Hence, there arose a need for internationalization for finding new customers and markets. Entrepreneurial orientation needed a change. The new Chairman, Kunal, had expertise in operations management, with his wife, Priyanka, looking after development via overseas collaborations. The firm had been struggling to create a two-tier top-level management to decide on operational issues, besides search for newer destinations for increasing the scale of operations.

Expected learning outcomes

To understand how multilevel entrepreneurship happens and the importance of translating tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge, especially at times when the founder has to pass the baton to the second generation.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Manoj Joshi and Apoorva Srivastava

This study/paper aims to create an understanding on how a firm develops dynamic capabilities in new strategic dimensions. Innovation in organizations is not an exclusive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study/paper aims to create an understanding on how a firm develops dynamic capabilities in new strategic dimensions. Innovation in organizations is not an exclusive domain of large firms. Family-owned and -managed firms have aggressively integrated innovation. Focussed orientation towards product innovation combined with innovative capability and high levels of owner-manager motivation has helped translate technology-based family businesses into highly profitable and competitive ventures. Microlit, is a liquid handling product manufacturer producing high-quality, high-tech, cost-effective, single and multichannel micropipettes. Founded in 1988, by brothers Ajay and Atul Jain, it is based in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. The key contributor to the firm’s success has been its strong customer-oriented product designs. The challenge lies in development of dynamic capabilities to gain competence in new strategic dimensions? Would the firm be able to leverage its innovation drive?

Design/methodology/approach

The case is based on primary and secondary testing of the case several times and filling the case gaps during the process. To authenticate information, multiple sources of information have been used.

Findings

Dynamic capabilities are essential for a firm’s growth. The challenge is in continuously harnessing and managing it within a family business.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on observations of one company and research carried through secondary sources, which may limit the theory creation.

Practical implications

An enterprise largely competes on the basis of available talent, knowledge, competency and capability. Therefore, knowledge must be managed, and especially, from tacit to explicit.

Originality/value

The case is original with the business family in its second generation striving to perform amidst professionalization and internationalization.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Manoj Joshi and Apoorva Srivastava

The case aims to deal with multi generation entrepreneurship. Families are about people and businesses are about money, therefore, conflict between the two is inevitable…

Abstract

Purpose

The case aims to deal with multi generation entrepreneurship. Families are about people and businesses are about money, therefore, conflict between the two is inevitable. Family-owned businesses develop competitive edges when they align values, vision, strategy, investment and governance to make both family and business activities more professional and mutually supportive. It is a belief that “treating the business like a family”, driven by values and concern for human needs, creates an organization with motivated people working together to create long-term value. Jitesh Ghai is the MD of Panchamrit Asbestos Ltd (PAL), which stands for PAL. Jitesh has an “experiential learning” with the cement sheet business and has understood the nuances of the business. It is supposedly required that PAL ought to professionalize owing to market infeasibility. Shashwat, his son has diversified interests and therefore desires to spin-off to “Big Apple”.

Design/methodology/approach

The case is based on research and secondary information, which has been tested several times, while filling the case gaps during the process. To authenticate information, multiple sources (vendors and customers) of information have been used.

Findings

There is a dilemma between the father-son relationship and decision to professionalise or spin-off! It is understood that in multigenerational business, it is not necessary that the subsequent generation keep the same business, but must preserve wealth and traditions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on observations on one organisation and research carried through secondary sources, which may limit to theory building.

Practical implications

An enterprise largely competes on the basis of available talent, knowledge, competency and capability. Therefore, knowledge must be managed. For survival and growth, business transition must be handled effectively.

Originality/value

The case is original with the business family in its second generation striving to survive.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2013

Devendra Singh and Manoj K. Joshi

Since the education of Master of Science students in the discipline of agriculture is catalectic without libraries, the present paper seeks to assess the information…

1320

Abstract

Purpose

Since the education of Master of Science students in the discipline of agriculture is catalectic without libraries, the present paper seeks to assess the information literacy competency (ILC) of post graduate (PG) students at Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, India, along with the impact of instruction initiatives in this respect.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Standards for Science and Engineering/Technology, 2006, an instrument was developed with 79 scoring items in the first part of the questionnaire along with non‐scoring items in the second part. Broad headings of the questions asked are shown in detail. Validity and reliability of the instrument are also reported.

Findings

Information literacy competency of PG students has been found satisfactory along with significant difference between the first and second year students. Results of the paper distinguish between the first and second year students in the light of five information literacy (IL) standards along with other considerations. Various instruction initiatives were found to have a positive impact upon the ILC of PG students.

Practical implications

Since the study has been able to establish a positive relationship between instruction initiatives and ILC, such initiatives may be introduced in other academic institutions.

Originality/value

None of the earlier reported research instruments had used science and engineering/technology IL standards, especially upon PG students in agriculture. This study further paved the way for the development of such an nstrument along with assessing the ILC of PG students and impact of instruction initiatives in an agricultural university.

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2013

Manoj Joshi, Apoorva Srivastava and Varun Ashwini Aggarwal

The case aims to deal with multigenerational entrepreneurship. The family business of sports goods was initiated by Yashpal Aggarwal and his friends in the 1950s. Yashpal…

7431

Abstract

Purpose

The case aims to deal with multigenerational entrepreneurship. The family business of sports goods was initiated by Yashpal Aggarwal and his friends in the 1950s. Yashpal acquired the art of doing business and started initially with trading of sporting goods in Mumbai. Yashpal had three sons, Ashok, Ashwini and Rajesh, who ventured into sports trading business as well. After the demise of Yashpal, Ashok shifted to Jalandhar and started a manufacturing unit, producing roller skates. Ashwini, being entrepreneurial and innovative, had always desired to professionalise the business and hence started with Okini Sports. Okini Sports emerged as the first organised professional sports mall in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on case research, individual interviews at different levels, testing the case several times and filling the case gaps during the process to authenticate information, multiple sources of information have been used.

Findings

Businesses largely compete on the basis of available talent, competency and capability. Family businesses must be open to induct competent people within the family with the required skills to lead the company. If a family nurtures a member with requisite skills, values, to keep shareholders, key customers, and suppliers loyal to the business, then family leadership is the best option. As the business grows in dimension, differential capabilities are required to run the business competitively, hence, inducting talented individuals as professionals is a better option. A family must be realistic about the talents available internally.

Research limitations/implications

This case is restricted to sports family business entrepreneurship in the context of India, but has a great learning towards multigenerational entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The case is original with the family in its fourth generation, the youngest looking to diversify and professionalize the business, set his family dreams of setting up the biggest sports mall in India.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

109

Abstract

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

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