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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Pradeep Kautish, Arpita Khare and Rajesh Sharma

This paper aims to examine the relationships among two distinct yet interconnected forms of value orientations, namely, terminal and instrumental values, brand

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationships among two distinct yet interconnected forms of value orientations, namely, terminal and instrumental values, brand consciousness and behavioral intentions. This study validated the conceptual model for branded fashion apparel consumption in an emerging market, e.g. India.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design followed a two-step approach to test the measurement and structural models for partial least squares structural equation modeling with SmartPLS (v.3.0) as recommended by Anderson and Gerbing (1988).

Findings

The results illustrated that both the instrumental and terminal values influence brand consciousness and, consequently, brand consciousness had an impact on behavioral intentions for fashion apparel consumption. Instrumental values had a greater influence on brand consciousness and behavioral intentions than terminal values. Brand consciousness mediated the relationship between instrumental/terminal values and behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study defined two value orientations (i.e. instrumental versus terminal) using cross-sectional data from an emerging market. Future studies may examine the research findings’ generalizability using diverse data sets (longitudinal and cross-sectional) and evaluate the value orientation and customers’ favorable behavioral intentions for luxury fashion consumption.

Practical implications

This study provides insights into luxury marketers and practitioners to understand the contribution of instrumental and terminal values on brand consciousness and behavioral intentions for luxury fashion apparel. The findings would assist in developing marketing strategies for an emerging market, i.e. India.

Social implications

With the rapid proliferation of materialism, the Indian market has witnessed the dawn of a new era of luxury fashion acceptance. The research offers evidence that in emerging markets such as India, consumers exhibit value orientation toward luxury brands while holding a sense of fashion involvement in their consumption behavior.

Originality/value

This study is a pioneering attempt to understand the relationships between the value orientation, namely, instrumental and terminal values and their underlying influence on brand consciousness and behavioral intentions toward fashion apparel. Rokeach’s (1973) two-dimensional value dichotomy was adapted to understand luxury apparel consumption in an emerging market context, specifically India.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Ho Jung Choo, Heekang Moon, Hyunsook Kim and Namhee Yoon

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize luxury customer value and empirically test the reliability and validity of the proposed structure of it. In addition, it aims…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize luxury customer value and empirically test the reliability and validity of the proposed structure of it. In addition, it aims to identify luxury customer value factors that influence brand relationship and behavioural intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A thorough literature study produces a comprehensive model of luxury consumer value. For an empirical test of the model, a web‐based on‐line survey is performed using a consumer sample in Korea. Statistical tests including CFA, second order factor analysis and structural model testing using covariance analysis are conducted.

Findings

The findings show that the luxury customer value represents a second‐order construct. The results provide satisfactory support for the four‐value structure model composed of utilitarian, hedonic, symbolic and economic values. Utilitarian value includes excellence and functional values, whereas hedonic value encompasses aesthetic, pleasure and experiential values. Symbolic value is reflected in self‐expressive and social values. Regarding the effect of luxury customer value on relationship quality, customers who perceive high symbolic, economic and functional values for luxury brands are more likely to develop a positive relationship with the brands.

Originality/value

In an attempt to confirm the luxury customer value structure in an emerging economy under a collective culture, this study expands previous studies on the conceptualization of luxury customer value. Through the empirical phase of the study, measures with both high reliability and validity for luxury customer value are produced, which will provide great benefits for further studies in the subject area. The association between customer value and brand relationship is examined.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Irem Eren-Erdogmus, Ilker Akgun and Esin Arda

In recent years, brand extension has become a popular and fundamental strategy of most luxury brands. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the factors that affect the…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, brand extension has become a popular and fundamental strategy of most luxury brands. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the factors that affect the success of luxury brand extensions by incorporating luxury brand value perceptions, parent brand attitude, fit perceptions and consumers’ product category involvement and innovativeness in a holistic model. The model is tested for two hypothetical luxury brand extensions types: complement and transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) technique to identify the variables that combine to produce a positive or a negative attitude towards luxury brand extensions. The research was conducted on 555 young women professionals (254 for brand extension Type 1 – complement (umbrella); and 301 for brand extension type – transfer (seating furniture), respectively).

Findings

The results show that perceived fit between the parent brand and extension is a necessary condition for a positive evaluation of both extension types. Other than perceived fit, hedonic and symbolic values and consumer involvement are proven to be necessary antecedent conditions for the evaluation of transfer extensions. This study also proposes several configurations for forming a positive attitude towards each brand extension type and makes implications for luxury managers and further research.

Originality/value

The results of the research are significant in several ways. First, this study adds to the extant literature by exploring a somehow neglected subject: luxury fashion brand extensions. The study tests a more holistic model than those of previous studies on luxury brand extensions and utilises two different extension contexts adapted from Aaker and Keller (1990). Second, this study is the first to apply fsQCA to identify the factors of luxury brand extension evaluations. fsQCA is highly applicable to large-scale data without the loss of detail or the potential for complexity.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Jae-Eun Kim, Stephen Lloyd, Keji Adebeshin and Ju-Young M. Kang

The purpose of this paper is to advance the theory and practice of luxury and masstige brand advertising effectiveness by decoding symbolism imbedded in fashion advertising.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the theory and practice of luxury and masstige brand advertising effectiveness by decoding symbolism imbedded in fashion advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a semiotic analysis of masstige brand advertising to discover those messages and themes that emerge and that communicate masstige values.

Findings

The research identifies identitary values that are exclusive to masstige brands, and those they share with luxury brands.

Research limitations/implications

The purpose of this research is not to make generalizations; rather, its purpose is to offer insights into those themes that define luxury and masstige brand identitary values.

Practical implications

The research provides insights into the key identifiers, which may inspire further research and provide marketing insights for the operation management in luxury fashion.

Originality/value

The research contributes to luxury and masstige retail brand research by identifying the symbolic meaning of luxury advertising.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Květa Olšanová, Andrea Escobar Ríos, Gina Cook, Petr Král and Marija Zlatić

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of luxury buyers' awareness of a luxury brand's corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities together with its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of luxury buyers' awareness of a luxury brand's corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities together with its individual brand-related sustainable dimensions (in terms of economic, societal and environmental) and luxury values on purchase intention for luxury products and, as a result, highlight the potential implications of these relationships for the luxury industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A luxury purchase intention model, which assumes an impact from traditional luxury values and CSR, was indicated based on the authors' previous qualitative research and corresponding literature review. To validate the model by proving that the suggested relationships are statistically significant, (1,100) luxury customers over the age of 18 were approached, and (253) valid responses were entered and analyzed using SEM to confirm the indicated theoretical model's hypothesized causal relations.

Findings

The findings suggest a positive and significant relationship between buyers’ awareness of a specific luxury brand's CSR-related activities and their purchase intention; however, certain demographics and gender both moderate this relationship. The moderating role of general attitudes toward CSR and sustainability on this relationship was not confirmed. Furthermore, awareness of the brand's CSR positively mediates the relationship between both the societal/environmental and economic parts of the brand-related individual sustainable dimension and purchase intention.

Originality/value

The results of this study are based on actual purchases of branded luxury items and validate the authors' indicative model based on earlier qualitative research by claiming a significant relationship between the purchase intention for a brand and awareness of its CSR activities amongst luxury shoppers.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Juhee Kang

The purpose of this paper is to identify the antecedents and consequences of romantic brand love in the luxury hotel context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the antecedents and consequences of romantic brand love in the luxury hotel context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from guests who had stayed at a luxury hotel within the past year and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings indicate that uniqueness and hedonic values are a prerequisite of evoking closeness and passionate feelings toward hotel brands, resulting in guests’ advocacy and willingness to pay a premium price.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications for luxury hotel marketers by introducing a new angle to understand brand love and suggesting desirable post-consumption behaviors through creating romantic love relationships between guests and hotel brands.

Originality/value

Research on the multidimensional aspects of luxury value is limited. This study proposes a conceptual model to investigate which luxury values enable guests to fall in love with brands and influence future behavior decisions and identifies opportunities for managerial benefits relating to consumers who are not traditional or frequent visitors to hotels.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Shan Chen and Lucio Lamberti

– The purpose of this study is to explore the perception of luxury from the perspectives of Chinese upper-class consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the perception of luxury from the perspectives of Chinese upper-class consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Four focus groups, each consisting of six upper-class and experienced luxury consumers, are formed in four cities, Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Hong Kong, which are among the most affluent, populated and developed in the luxury market.

Findings

The findings suggest that Chinese upper-class luxury consumers, indeed, hold different perceptions for luxury in several aspects: price premium is a prestige in contrast to general Chinese consumers’ “value-consciousness”; exclusivity is more valued by the upper-class and experienced consumers; more attention of the upper-class consumers has shifted to individual values from social values; brand value is of high importance; and there exist differences among consumers in different regions.

Practical implications

The study suggests that luxury brands should recognize the differences between the upper-class customers who are still the core consumers for luxury goods and the middle-class customers who are growing rapidly while designing their marketing strategies.

Originality/value

The study focuses, unprecedentedly, on the upper-class and experienced Chinese luxury consumers who represent the most valuable group of customers of the luxury brands in the Chinese market. Given the peculiarity of customer behavior in the luxury market, such focus provides a brand new perspective without the noises from the inclusion of consumers with insufficient purchasing power and ineligible experience in luxury consumption.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Ling Jiang and Juan Shan

Despite the growing research regarding consumer luxury value perception and their influence on luxury consumption behavior in different cultural contexts, there is little…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the growing research regarding consumer luxury value perception and their influence on luxury consumption behavior in different cultural contexts, there is little research investigating the cultural variation toward luxury within different generations in a given society. The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationships among Confucian propriety, luxury value perception, and purchase intention of luxury brands, and especially how these relationships differ between young and older consumers in a Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a questionnaire survey in China. A multi-group structural equation model was used to test the conceptual model and research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that the effects of functional value and social value on purchase intention of luxury brands are stronger for older generations than younger ones, while the effects of self-identity and hedonic value on purchase intention are stronger for younger generations than older ones. The Confucian propriety relates positively to the functional value and social value; however, these effects are more salient for older consumers.

Originality/value

The results of this study reveal the evolution of luxury consumption values and behaviors of Chinese consumers, suggesting that marketers should no longer label Chinese luxury consumers with common behaviors. It is also recommended that marketers of luxury brands in China should adapt this shifting attitude and respond actively to the expectations of different generations.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2013

Ning Li, Andrew Robson and Nigel Coates

Purchases of luxury fashion brands continues to grow rapidly in metropolitan China, creating a significant global marketplace. Associated behaviour is maturing, exhibiting…

Abstract

Purpose

Purchases of luxury fashion brands continues to grow rapidly in metropolitan China, creating a significant global marketplace. Associated behaviour is maturing, exhibiting levels of sophistication and is risk averse, consequently, purchasing intention and willingness to pay more represent areas for marketer consideration, as do the potential impact of consumer‐perceived brand value and affect on these outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 431 Chinese consumers located in Beijing was undertaken within shopping malls specialising in luxury brands, fashion items included. The analysis undertaken considers the influence of value and affect on purchase intention and consumers’ willingness to pay extra, achieved by deploying confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equations modelling (SEM).

Findings

Functional and social value positively influence consumers’ willingness to pay premium prices, impending purchase intentions and affective attitude towards luxury brands, functional value consistently acting as the more dominant predictor, with attitude further directly influencing purchase intention. Symbolic values afforded by consumers influence to some extent affective attitude, but not willingness to pay, whilst the direct effect on purchase intention is counter intuitive.

Research limitations/implications

The research was restricted to Beijing, where consumer behaviour understanding is transferable to other key Chinese conurbations, but not necessarily to the majority of the country, where disposable income levels and consumer relationships with fashion and luxury are recognisably different.

Originality/value

This centres on setting and recognition of the key antecedents of purchase intention and a propensity to pay more for items of fashion and luxury.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Jia Yun Wong and Ganga Sasidharan Dhanesh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the framing and rhetorical devices employed by luxury brands to build CSR-based, ethical corporate identities while managing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the framing and rhetorical devices employed by luxury brands to build CSR-based, ethical corporate identities while managing complexities of the CSR-luxury paradox, the perceived clash between the self-transcendent values of CSR, and the self-enhancement values of luxury.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative frame analysis was conducted to create detailed frame matrices for each dimension of CSR message content, followed by quantitative content analysis to establish the extent of usage of these frames across 43 luxury brand websites in the apparel, beauty, jewelry, and watch categories.

Findings

Luxury brands predominantly framed their CSR efforts as discretionary, driven by altruistic motives. They foregrounded brand over social issue and highlighted substantial input into CSR efforts consistently over a period. CSR efforts were put into programs that were congruent with the brands’ business and that conveyed impact in abstract terms, evoking emotions over logic. Such framing across the CSR message-dimensions of issues, motives, importance, commitment, fit, and impact reflected a sophisticated understanding of communicating to a socially and environmentally conscious demographic while simultaneously aligning with the central, enduring, and distinctive characteristics of luxury.

Originality/value

This study contributes to emerging empirical work on CSR as a tool to build ethical corporate identity. This study also adds to the literature on identity management and CSR communication in the luxury industry, a sector that exceeded €1 trillion in retail sales in 2016.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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