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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Karen Brown, Heather McIlveen and Christopher Strugnell

The need for effective nutritional education for young consumers has become increasingly apparent given their general food habits and behaviour, particularly during…

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Abstract

The need for effective nutritional education for young consumers has become increasingly apparent given their general food habits and behaviour, particularly during adolescence. Aims to analyse the interaction between young consumers’ food preferences and their nutritional awareness behaviour, within three environments (home, school and social). Preliminary findings in this study would indicate that the perceived dominance of this home, school and social interaction appears to be somewhat overshadowed by the young consumers, developing “independence” trait, particularly during adolescent years. This appears to be reflected in their food preferences within the associated three environments. Suggests that such food preferences are often of a “fast food”‐style and consequently the food habits of many young consumers may fuel the consumption of poor nutritionally balanced meals. While young consumers were aware of healthy eating, their food preference behaviour did not always appear to reflect such knowledge, particularly within the school and social environments.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Jieqi Guan, Yui-yip Lau, Huijun Yang and Lianping Ren

This paper aims to explore factors affecting young consumers’ purchasing of new smart products under the influence of social media.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore factors affecting young consumers’ purchasing of new smart products under the influence of social media.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty semi-structured, face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted with young consumers who used new media, and five extended interviews were conducted with popular smartwatch retailers in Macau.

Findings

The findings reveal that they tend to garner product information from multiple channels of communication. Social media exert the greatest influence. Reliable information, strong branding and interactions with vendors are also influential, although new product pre-announcements may be boring and difficult to understand.

Originality/value

This study presents new insights into diffusion of innovation theory and provides retailers launching smart products with a better understanding of their target young customers’ purchasing behavior.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Justyna Franc-Dąbrowska, Irena Ozimek, Iwona Pomianek and Joanna Rakowska

The purpose of the research was to investigate how young consumers perceive food safety and if they trust that official food control agencies or other actors of food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research was to investigate how young consumers perceive food safety and if they trust that official food control agencies or other actors of food supply chains ensure a proper level of safety of food in Poland. The purpose of the paper was also to find out if young consumers are currently concerned that a proper level of food safety is not ensured.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis was based on a data set from 650 questionnaires collected in an online survey carried out in October 2020 and addressed to the group of young consumers, students of Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Poland. The analysis was carried out using standard methods of qualitative data analysis (QDA), descriptive statistics, Spearman’s correlation coefficient and Pearson’s chi-square test.

Findings

Less than a half of Polish young consumers consider food to be safe and many other do not have an opinion about this matter. Young consumers do not perceive official agencies in charge of food control as the most responsible for food safety, and they either do not trust these institutions or have no opinion about it. Young consumers declare that food producers and food processing businesses are the most responsible for food safety while retailers and consumers are the least responsible ones. The majority of young consumers are not concerned about ensuring proper food safety.

Originality/value

Up-to-date young consumers' perception of the role and trust in official food control agencies and food safety in Poland have not been investigated, which makes this study a novelty. The findings can be valuable to official agencies in charge of food control and consumer education, to improve their functioning. They can also be important as a basis for further studies, as young consumers’ attitudes and trust in official food control agencies can change.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Heejung Park

In the uncertainty of the global economy, many young adults have financial independence from their parents and are making financial decisions in a difficult financial…

Abstract

Purpose

In the uncertainty of the global economy, many young adults have financial independence from their parents and are making financial decisions in a difficult financial environment. This study aims to focus on debt management behavior for young adult consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The data is from the 2010 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). The NLSY97 includes information on US young consumers’ financial, demographic and attitudinal characteristics, as well as various socio-economic conditions, making it convenient to explore the relationships between financial behavior and psychology variables. In the 2010 survey, 4,110 young consumers were interviewed.

Findings

The results show that self-determination and motivation alone cannot bring about a direct change in financial behavior without the mediation of financial psychology. Therefore, consumer finance research should consider debt-management behavior by presenting different strategies than those currently used.

Originality/value

In the self-determination theory, emphasizes the internal grounds for distinguishing self-regulation from personality development and behavior. Specially, this paper deals with the financial behavior of young adult consumers through self-determination theory.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

S M Fatah Uddin and Mohammed Naved Khan

– The purpose of this study is to explore factors that affect green purchasing behaviour (GPB) of young Indian consumers.

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2062

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore factors that affect green purchasing behaviour (GPB) of young Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 161 young Indian consumers between age group of 15 and 18 years residing in northern region of the country were surveyed employing researcher controlled sampling. Data was collected thorough structured refined research instrument that comprised scales to measure various facets of green purchasing behaviour using five point Likert scale. The research instrument also included questions for generating demographic profile of respondents. For the purpose of meeting the study objectives, research hypotheses, well-grounded in relevant theory were empirically tested using appropriate statistical tools.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) revealed existence of five underlying factors namely green purchasing behaviour, environmental involvement, environmental attitude, environmental consciousness and perceived effectiveness of environmental behaviour that affect green purchasing behaviour of young urban consumers in India. Green purchasing behaviour and its variation across demographic variables has been ascertained by testing the considered hypotheses.

Research limitations/implications

The results may not be providing generalizability.

Practical/implications

This paper is expected to provide valuable insights in the area of green purchasing behaviour of young Indian urban consumers which can be of immense help to domestic and international marketers in dovetailing their marketing strategies and developing appropriate promotional messages.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to provide a glimpse into the nature of green purchasing behaviour of young urban Indian consumers which has been scantily researched. Also the gender differences among young Indian consumers regarding green attitudes contributes to the worth of literature.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

David Marshall

The purpose of this paper is to consider the question of young consumer’s discretionary consumption in Japan where the ready access to convenience stores, or “konbini”…

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1824

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the question of young consumer’s discretionary consumption in Japan where the ready access to convenience stores, or “konbini”, presents a unique retail landscape and to look at how young Japanese consumers use this store format as part of their discretionary food consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory study that draws on primary qualitative data based on in store observations, accompanied shopping and a survey with young Japanese consumers. This approach provides an insight into the convenience store food offering and young consumer’s everyday food practices and experience of using these retail stores.

Findings

The data reveals a relatively limited range of purchases on each store visit with some variation across time of the day and between individuals and groups of young consumers. Visits before and after school remain the most popular and young consumers make around two to four visits per week to a convenience store. It finds young consumers actively engaged in independent purchasing decisions in this retail format.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study with a geographically constrained sample conducted in several areas in and around Tokyo, Japan. It is a convenience sample recruited using student contacts and snowballing techniques.

Practical implications

Convenience stores represent an important “shopping habitat” for young consumers to engage in discretionary food shopping. While these convenience store purchases are not always unhealthy the promotion and pricing strategies used by retailers can have an influence on the final selection of products and convenience stores provide a unique opportunity to cultivate more healthful behaviour among young consumers.

Originality/value

This offers a unique insight into the relationship between young consumer’s discretionary food choice and local retail provision in the convenience sector. It adds to the debate on the role of food environment on food choice and the extent to which young Japanese consumers are socialised into particular food practices through their engagement with the convenience retail sector.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Arham Adnan, Asad Ahmad and Mohammed Naved Khan

The purpose of this paper is to identify what lifestyles best explain and impact ecological behavior among young Indian consumers.

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1937

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify what lifestyles best explain and impact ecological behavior among young Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adapts the lifestyle scale developed by He et al. (2010) and the Actual Commitment scale to the Indian context to describe its impact on the young consumer’s ecological profile. The study is based on an extensive literature review. The data were obtained from a questionnaire handed out to a sample of 250 students. With the information obtained, and after the scale validation process, a structural equation analysis has been conducted.

Findings

Findings of the study highlight that environmental patterns and lifestyle factors are those that best characterize the ecological market segment. This group of young consumers is characterized by their self-identity and a feeling of uniqueness. They are people who always try to improve themselves and take actions which pose a new challenge for them. They are also characterized by having an ecological lifestyle, selecting and recycling products and taking part in events to protect the environment. This type of consumer is a present and future investment for firms that are committed to the environment.

Originality/value

The results of this study might interest consumer behavior researchers and those firms that care about the ecological consumers. Moreover, previous studies have not dealt with young consumers. Further research is needed including new psychographic variables.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Sanjeev Verma

The purpose of this paper is to find the niche segmentation of green consumers as a solution to psychographic or demographic predicament. Age cohort and generational…

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1406

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find the niche segmentation of green consumers as a solution to psychographic or demographic predicament. Age cohort and generational cohort (Gen Y and Gen Z) of young consumers are studied for individualization and customization.

Design/methodology/approach

Age cohorts (Gen Z and Gen Y customers) have their unique needs. Both Gen Y (1981-1995) and Gen Z (post-1995) belong to the young consumer segment in the age group of 20-30 years but their generational cohorts are different. Strategic marketing advocates both generational marketing based on age cohorts and segmented marketing for young consumers. Strategic marketing faces cross-road between youth segmentation and generational cohort (Gen Z and Gen Y) due to intersection between the two during the 20-30 age group. Primary data using the ecological conscious consumer behavior (ECCB) scale was collected and analyzed for understanding the individual and relative importance of psychographic and demographic factors in influencing green behavior. The traditional youth segment is sliced into four sub-groups (Young Nest 1-4), and their interaction effect with post hoc analysis was done for the identification of sources of difference between different age cohorts. The findings of the study were compared with previous studies and unique contributions of this study were identified.

Findings

The findings indicate multiple niche young segments with demographic as the primary criterion and psychographic as the building block. Niche level and individual level segments emerge due to the interaction of various factors within a given age cohort. The findings confirm the identity development process which considered age as an important factor that affects varying choices throughout life from adolescence to adulthood.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may be used for effective targeting and positioning strategy of green marketing. In the time of analytics, age cohorts and generational cohort of young consumers can be approached differently for yielding better environmental results. The magnified niche level segmentation of young consumers may be used to develop individualized and customized promotions for young customers in Young Nest 1-4 for an enhanced ECCB.

Originality/value

Previous studies have focused more on consumer characteristics (demographic or psychographic) and their relative importance but niche level segmentation within given demographic segment was not attempted before. This study is unique in offering microscopic analysis of age cohorts of young consumers (Young Nest 1-4) and their interaction with other demographic variables (gender and income) for niche level segmentation.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Yusuf Hassan and Jatin Pandey

Religion plays an important role in promoting and inhibiting consumption of goods and services. Halal food, for instance, represents one such food permitted by Islam…

Abstract

Purpose

Religion plays an important role in promoting and inhibiting consumption of goods and services. Halal food, for instance, represents one such food permitted by Islam. Within a broader category of consumers for religiously sanctioned products such as halal food, young consumers represent an important segment, as they have a high lifetime value, thereby requiring special attention. This study aims to identify and examine individual and social factors that can foster young consumer’s engagement for halal products.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive research approach using the Gioia method has been used to develop broader themes for discussion. The authors have also proposed a model for engaging young consumers for religiously sanctioned dietary products.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights into the interplay of identities and value sources that encourages or forbids consumer engagement for halal products.

Practical implications

Globally, the halal food industry has been estimated to be worth $580bn, and it is growing at an average rate of 7 per cent annually. Marketers, thus, need to be aware of diverse consumers’ needs to provide a customized offering; they have to cater to adherent customers of these religiously sanctioned products by being sensitive to intricacies that make such food items consumable. The study will help marketers to better align their promotional strategies with the needs and requirement of young consumers.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors have operationalized repeated interaction and associated consumption in the context of halal food to understand how religion and other factors play a role in strengthening or weakening consumer engagement. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no study has been done to understand young consumer’s engagement for halal food products in the Indian context. India being a land of multi-religion and multi-culture, such studies can provide rich insights.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Erin E. Baca, Juan Holguin and Andreas W. Stratemeyer

Direct‐to‐consumer advertising (DTCA) is a pervasive element in society today. Consumers have responded accordingly by becoming more knowledgeable, developing specific…

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8118

Abstract

Purpose

Direct‐to‐consumer advertising (DTCA) is a pervasive element in society today. Consumers have responded accordingly by becoming more knowledgeable, developing specific perceptions and attitudes toward DTCA. The purpose of this article is to examine direct‐to‐consumer prescription drug advertising issues among younger adults as both consumers and caregivers to determine whether companies are, or should be, taking advantage of building brand value through DTCA.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 225 young adults answered questionnaires to measure the effects of DTCA. The questionnaire was based on a study by the National Consumers League and only the items that were most central to the current study were utilized and/or modified to measure the following key variables: age; current health status; prescription drug use; attitudes toward DTCA; interest in DTCA; DTCA recall; and inclination to seek additional information.

Findings

The findings show that demographics influence attitudes and interest in DTCA, as well as younger consumers' interest and propensity to seek additional information for themselves and family members. Details of the statistical analysis of the study are given.

Originality/value

The implications of the findings for pharmaceutical marketers, health care advisors, and academic researchers are discussed in the paper.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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